Wednesday, October 17, 2007

THE EPIC OF THE FRIULANS OF CALIFORNIA


WELCOME VISITORS FROM FURLAN DIASPORE BLOGSPOT:
http://www.furlans.blogspot.com/


IF YOU WANT TO SEE 'LA NOSTRA COSTA' PUBLICIZED IN THE 'FRIULI NEL MONDO' NEWSPAPER, "CLICCA" ON THE ARTICLE ABOVE TO ENLARGE THE IMAGE. IT IS IN ITALIAN HOWEVER YOU MAY RECOGNIZE SOME OF THE PEOPLE IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS. 'FRIULI NEL MONDO' IS PUBLISHED IN UDINE, ITALY AND IS CIRCULATED THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. WEBSITE: http://www.friulinelmondo.com/

32 comments:

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

I received this follow-up e-mail
from "Furlan de Diaspore:


Hello Ivano,

I left you a message a couple of weeks ago on your blog and you
promptly and very kindly answered me
Well, I just wrote a post about your blog, (on my blog) I found all
your posts very interesting about the life of italian-americans in
California. I was in Santa Cruz several years ago and I really enjoyed
the place.

Thank you,

Norman Scaravetti
(Columbia, Maryland)

amoleapi said...

From Friuli, my parents were from Collio, near Cividale, mandi^^

ivano said...

WELCOME AMOLEAPI: IF YOU WISH CONTACT ME DIRECT AT: ivcomelli@arilion.com

Hopefully,you've checked out the Blog and read the articles (with photos) by Professor Derrill Kerrick and his wife Kathy describing their adventures in Ramandolo/Nimis/Friuli. Although they are world travelers, this was the first time they have visited the Friuli Region and they were so impressed that they want to go back and they are also recommending it to all their friends. He is a Professor Emeritus of Geoscience at Penn State. Judging from all the photos they have sent me, Derrill and Kathy have sent me, they certaily must now be Honorary Furlans.

Please keep in touch. ivano

Furlans de diaspore said...

Ivano,

Often I go back and read some of your older posts, amazing stories. Next time that I visit California I will have to stop in Santa Cruz and take a closer look.
Keep posting.


Norman

ivano said...

Thanks Norman: As long as my "La Nostra Costa" fans keep contributing their stories to the "Blagga", it will continue to be something special. As you well know a blog can only be successful if others are willing to participate.

If you do come this way, please contact me and I will arrange to give you a special tour of "La Costa" were the Furlans of Nimis once duelled with the Toscanos of Lucca. (Figuratively speaking of course.) ivn0

gino said...

O MY!! GINO 'D'BAFFI' CAMPIONI HAS
TAKEN OFFENSE (SOMEWHAT) TO MY FURLANS VS TOSCANOS COMMENT. SO THIS RENOWNED TOSCANO WHO CREATED THE 'ITANGLISH' DICTIONARY (PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED ON THE BLAGGA)SERVES UP ONE OF HIS FAMOUS "COME SI DICE" LECTURES.
BRAVO, GINO.

Furlanos, toscano, chi siamo? Spagnoli?


Ciao Ivano,

Yes, I did see the newest comment on the Blagga.

It almost caused me to add another comment. (nastygram?)

That is, who are we anyway? Italiani o spagnoli?

Why, you ask? Because italian words don't become plural by adding an "s" at the end. That's Spanish.

Italian words or names become plural by changing the last letter to indicate plural as well as gender. Thus Furlano becomes Furlani (male) or Furlane (female) The same for Toscani or Toscane, or as CC had it, waving to the "bellos", should be to the "belli".

I know this is nit picking, but as some of the old folk used to say, "Parlà beng è sempre beng. Dua e dua fa quattra." Of course they were joking.

Here's another example of italian "hillbilly" talk: A group of these contadini are met in a courtroom, arguing about some inheritance and to whom it should go.
The discussion centers on a person whom they feel is too young to be the recipient. The discussion grows louder and louder as they are heard to say,

"Quant'anni ara? Arà, arà, arà . . nacque gliar di là. Che pole arà? Finally the judge, having heard enough of this, gets up and says, "Fuori di mia corte, ignoranti. Avete arato tutto il tribunale!"

The foregoing was a quote from Baffi (my father) himself, one of the most typical of contadini.

By the way, the next time you get to Italy, you might consider visiting Uzzano, where Baffi was born. It is about a 40 minute drive West of Firenze and close to Collodi, where Carlo Collodi wrote the story of Pinocchio, and where the Pinocchio Park is still open to the public. You drive up a switchback road climbing the extinct volcano which is Uzzano, and on a flat area you find an abandoned Catholic church, an ancient castle with a bell tower, the Villa Lavoratti, where Giacomo Puccini wrote the second act of La Boheme, and a restaurant named, "Bigiano". On our April 1999 trip, we found it to be the best eating place in all Europe. Other than that, there are some old houses, still inhabited by families named Michelotti, related to Baffi's mother.

I think I already told you that while John and Nancy Mitton and I were having lunch there, I remarked that I could feel Baffi smiling down on us, and Nancy said she could feel it too. A wonderful experience for us.

Saluti, Gino (sempre nostalgico)

Doriano "THE CANADIAN FURLAN" said...

Italian immigrants and especially Friulani where my parents are from have left Italy and have left a huge impression no matter what part of the world they settled in. We should be proud for being visionaries. There was a massive article written some time ago in the Toronto star on how the Italians have come from poverty and have made a major impression on the Canadian landscape. I am certain this holds true for many areas of the United States as well.

Kevin said...

Ivano-- I found you through Norman's blog and I glad that I did. My family came to America from Zoppola and San Foca in the early 1900s. It makes me so proud to see folks recording the history of Friuli in America. And, I also hear that folks are beginning to record the history of the entire Friulan diaspora. It is an amazing story.

My wife and I moved to Nashville, TN last year from Berkeley, CA. I think that we may be the only Friulani in Tennessee. But, we are proud to represent!

Kevin.

PS You may want to tell Gino that we do form plurals in Furlan with an "s" at the end of the word. So, you were just going back to your roots!

Anonymous said...

I wish to extend a BIG MANDI !! To all the new additions to La Nostra Costa...Norman and Kevin. I am The Canadian Furlan. All the years that I travelled the USA for business this is the first time I have met so many Furlans!! This is fantastico.... The Furlans are a unique breed of people. We are so unique that Italy has given the Region of Friuli Venezia Julia autonomous status. Both in our language (Friulano is a language) and our customes. I have first hand experience being the Secretary of the Fogolar Furlan Club Niagara. Keep the comments flowing...Ivano Comelli I have great admiration in what you have started with your Blogg and La Nostra Costa... you have accomplished a lot in a very short period of time for all Furlans...throughout the world..

Ciao e Mandi

Doriano "THE CANADIAN FURLAN"

carolina cariola said...

Oh Gran Blaggatore: I think I may be part Furlana. I remember my father,Cicerone Cariola, saying "mandi","mandami" or "mandolo" or something like that. Is that true Furlan talk ??
Oh what a thrill to be Fulan. Bet that Polenta-head guy isn't one of us.
cc

Jaio said...

Hello everybody,
I'm very pleased to be here among all of you. Reading the main page with the article about your book I discovered the name of Suzanna Favarato from Argentina whit whit I was in connexion some years ago.
I'm interested about your book. Let me know more about.
Mandi
O si sintín
PSST: You are linked:-)

IVANO said...

WELCOME JAIO TO THE LNOSTRA-COSTA BLAGGA.

"LA NOSTRA COSTA" (OUR COAST) IS THE STORY OF MY PARENTS JOURNEY FROM NIMIS,PROVINCIA DI UDINE, ITALY TO THE NORTH COAST OF SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA. (LOCATED A FEW MILES SOUTH OF SAN FRANCISCO.) THE STORY IS TOLD THROUGH THE EYES OF A YOUNG BOY (ME) GROWNING UP ON THE MOSTLY ITALIAN OCCUPIED COAST AND COVERS THE PERIOD 1923 TO 1983 (APPROXIMATELY). THE BOOK IS PUBLISHED BY AUTHORHOUSE AND CAN BE OBTAINED THROUGH THEIR WEBSITE AT: www.authorhouse.com or by ordering it via their toll free hotline: 1-888-280-7715. OR IT CAN BE ORDERED THROUGH YOUR FAVORITE BOOKSTORE.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON "LA NOSTRA COSTA", VISIT MY WEBSITE:

www.lanostracosta.com-a.googlepages.com

BUONA FORTUNA E 'VIVA LA CUCCANGA

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

DEAR CAROLINA: I THINK THAT YOU MAY BE STRETCHING IT A BIT. HOWEVER, WHAT DOES IT MATTER WERE YOUR PARENTS WERE BORN. ITS THE SPIRIT OF THE FURLANS THAT IS IMPORTANT. BELIEVE ME, YOU CERTAINLY HAVE IT.

CON UN BACIN D'MOR. IVN0

saratoga sam said...

You know Carrie may be a Furlana at that.
She certainly has a lot of 'cuccagna". I remember her dad, quite well. They used to call him 'Cice" . I didn't know that his first name was Cicerone. Very strong guy and hard worker. Very protective of Carrie. That guy Polenta-head would have something to worry about if "Cice" were still around.

carolina cariola said...

Thank you Sam for remembering my father. He died so long ago,but I remember it like yesterday. He was such a sweet man. I miss him so.

By the way, is "Cuccanga" a good thing or a bad thing. cc

Canadian Furlan said...

Hey Carolina
This is the Canadian Furlan. The Cuccagna is a good thing nothing wrong at all. The Cuccagna is a game played at Friulano Picnics where a team of men or women try to climb a tall greased pole to caputure the prizes at the top. The Prizes usually were Salami, Cheese, Prosciutto etc. It usually took the teams the entire day to make it up the pole. Hence "La Cuccagna" is often refered to as the struggle through life. Many of the old time Friulani use this term. As a matter of fact they still use it today in Friuli. If you go to www.youtube.com and click on 'Il Palo della Cuccagna Part I" it will give you a very good example of the Cuccagna...

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

CAROLINA: MY COLLINS ITALIANO-INGLESE DICIONARTY SAYS:
CUCCAGNA (kuk'kanya): abundance,plenty, "paese della cuccagna" (Land of plenty), "e finita la cuccagna!" (The party is over!) "albero della cuccagna" (greasy pole).

During hard times or when things weren't going so good, "Bronco", my father, would often say: "E finita la cuccagna!" (The party is over!). This phrase was also uttered by many Italians at the end of WW II, when they 'strung up' the dead body of Italian Dictator Benito Mussolini by his heals in the Plaza in Milan.

So you see Carolina, for the most part 'cuccagna' is a good things, but it can also be associated with 'troubling' events. ivno

Johnny Coltivita said...

"E finita la cuccagna" . I tried that arthichoke recipe sent by annonymous in Oregon. It went up in smoke. Guess I was too busy watching the World Series. (Go RED Soxs. I think they got an Italian manager.) Will try again with the arthichokes, although the charred chokes and chicken weren't that bad for a bachelor meal. Johnny

Rosina said...

oh Johnny!! Poverino. No e finita la cuccagna.

You coma to my house and I will fix you the best piatto of carciofi
fritti that you ever had.

Anonymous said...

Ei, Gianni,

As Martin Yan, the famous far Eastern Toscano said on TV, "you have to stir fry, not stare fry."

Better luck next time.

Pancotto di Oregon

Canadian Furlan said...

This the Canadian Furlan again. Very shortly on Saturday November 10th our Fogolar Furlan Club will be celebrating our annual "Radicchio Sera". Do all of you know what Radicchio is ? We we have a competition on who grew the largest Radicchio and we will have a night of festivities. Polenta with a full course Friulano meal and dance.... should be a lot of fun. Hopefully la Cuccagna is never over.....
Ciao e Mandi

Doriano

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

Canadian Furlan: Radicchio always reminds me of my Godfather, Tony Marcuzzi (A Furlan from Nimis, P.70,LNC)who loved his Polenta e Radicchio. Of course he accompanied his meal with a glass or two,or three of his famous homemade 'vino rosso', which he made in his garage. (My father would always say of Tony's wine:
"Assagia di aceto" [It tastes like vinger]. Of course he would never say this to my Godfather, only to us.]

Radicchio also reminds me of the article: "From Santa Radicchio to Santa Rosa", a little know story about Italian Prisoners of War in America. This article can be found in the Nov.2006 archives on this "blagga".

I am sure the mention of Radicchio will "stir up" a lot more memories among our 'blagga' fan. I am sure you will have a good time at your festival. I wish I could be there. 'Viva la cuccagna" ivno

Anonymous said...

Hey, Pancotto di Oregon;

Maybe you and Carolina can have a "stare-fry" together. Don't forget you eye-glasses.

Mangapanne di Monterey

Anonymous said...

Eio, Mangapanne,

What kinda name diss "Mangapanne"?
Sounds like a Sicilian saying, "Manca panni". (lack of clothes)

Maybe you mean, "Mangiapane"?

Per la discussione di "cuccagna", lo sapete che c'è una famosa canzone che si chiama "Un Giro dei Castelli" dove si trova questo: (in toscano) "Son' meglio della sciampagna li vini di codeste vigne. Ci fanno alla cuccagna dal tempo di Noè." Nostro Ivano dovrebbe andare la in Frascati per fare la cuccagna.

Pancotto nostalgico

Proud to be Sicilian said...

Hey Pancotto: Like the Furlans in Ivano's story, I am very proud to be Sicilian. There are lots of us in Monterey. Come play bocci ball with us in the Plaza sometime.

Maybe my Italian is not so good,but the words are very meaningful to me.

When I was a very young child I used to go around with a blanket wrapped around me (security blanket??). For some reason I would always be chewing on one end. My mother nicknamed "Mangiapanni" (Did I get it right that time).

So you see "Pancotto" or "Pannicota", or what ever you name is there is always a story behind a name. What's your story??

Mangiapanni di Monterey.

Canadian Furlan said...

Hey this is to our Sicilian friend from Monterey... Bocce is a very popular game. Here in the Niagara Region Cananda our local Italian club has built an in door Bocce court. This is a necessity due to our severe winters. Actually they haven't been that severe lately. During the months of late January and Februrary the temperature dips well below freezing ... OUCH!! molt freddo!! Fortnately for the Furlans we have "Grappa" to keep warm. Now I am certain all of you out there in California know what "Grappa" is? It is a standard drink in our local Furlan homes. By the way Scilian, Calabrese, Abbruzzese does not matter we are all fratelli.

Ciao e Mandi
Doriano

Proud to be Sicilian said...

Hey Canadian Furlan: We play bocce ball year around in Monterey. The weather is great year around. No need for "grappa", but we do like our "bocce and vino".

I saw the article of Primo Carnera which appeared on Ivano's Blog.
Noted that he was a Furlan, or is that a Friulano. None of us from the "Sud of the Boot" has ever grown that big. To survive we had to cultivate "Gile and Cunningness" . Rather than fighting you, I could always make a deal that you couldn't refuse.

Mangiapanni di Monterey

P.S. I am still waiting to hear from "pancotto" in Oregon. I bet the guy is a Toscano. Couldn't be one of us, that's for sure.

Canadian Furlan said...

Hey my fellow Scilian Brother from Monterey CA. I wish our weather was as good as Monterey, unfortunately we are a little further North. Our winters have improved but we are not yet to the level of CA. Our summers reach the high 80's low 90's. I am glad you read the article about Carnera, because I am the one who wrote it. Yes Carnera was Friulano..There were many excellent Scilian-American Boxers as well... I am a true Boxing Fan. There is a good group in Northern CA, The Northern California Veterans Boxers Association.
Take care and make sure you have a few drinks of wine while playing Bocce. The "Grappa" well during our summer months we place the bottle in the freezer... it never freezes solid but cools it down and it is very smooth.
Take care and "Sempre Avanti"

Doriano

anonymous furlan said...

Can I stompa da grapes and squisha between da toes.

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

Anonymous Furlan: "You can stompa da grapes and squisha between the toes' at the Guglielmo Winery. Not on my "epopea". ivn0

asiirah said...

Ciao Ivano,
My husband grew up in Porcia, Pordenone and came to Canada with his parents in the late 60's. How great to find your blog!He still
speaks Italian, dialetto Veneto, and his father's old dialect,which included more Furlan .
I learned to speak il dialetto Veneto well while translating TV programs for "veccia." Keeping a culture alive starts with language, especially when you no longer live in the country you were born in. How wonderful that your blog is a vehicle for Furlans
to keep in touch- maybe you could write a sentence in Furlan when you're blogging so we can all remind ourselves what a beautiful language it is. I'll definitely show your blog to my husband!

ivcomelli@arilion.com said...

Welcome ASIIRAH to the LNostra-Costa 'Blagga'. It is alway nice to have another Furlan aboard. Unfortunately I don't write in Furlan, However, Norman does on his blog: Cicca onhis Furlans de diaspore link in the comments to view. Also on Jaio and Keven in the comments. You will get Furlan phrases to your hearts content. ivno