Saturday, December 29, 2007

DAVENPORT - A MOMENT IN TIME



IVANO SAYS: I AM RE-PUBLISHING THIS ARTICLE BY PATTY MORELLI BECAUSE (1) I THINK IT IS VERY WELL WRITTEN DESERVING A SECOND LOOK, AND (2)I RECEIVED A PHOTO OF THE CASH STORE PHOTO (ABOVE)FROM LEN KLEMPNAUER, FORMER SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL REPORTER. THE PHOTO ADDS DRAMATIC EFFECT TO PATTY'S ARTICLE. (FOR PHOTO CREDITS SEE COMMENTS BY LEN KLEMPNAUER.)



Patty Morelli grew up in Davenport. In fact she and her family lived in New Town, in the very same house were my parents lived when I was first born. Maybe our urge to write about Davenport and "La Costa" can be traced back to that house on First Street. Thanks for the memories, Patty.






A Moment In Time In Davenport
By Patty Morelli

I have so many wonderful experiences to share about my childhood in Davenport. Both my Mom, Evelyn Collins, and my Dad, Mac Morelli, grew up in Davenport. Their parents (Gilda Bertacca and Tony Collins; Tootsie Morelli and Violet Dingwall) lived much of their lives in Davenport, as well. So, as a result, I grew up with quite a legacy of ‘stories’. And, of course, I have a bunch of my own.

I lived in Davenport until I was 13 years old, and then we moved to Santa Cruz. I remember very well the day we left. It was the day after Easter vacation started in 1953. We had stuffed the last of our boxed up belongings between my 2 sisters, Margo and Carole, in the back seat of our old Chevy. My brother Macie and I climbed halfheartedly into the front seat. My Mom was driving and I could see she was eager for this move. She’d been a Davenport girl since she was 3 years old and now she was starting a new life ‘in the big city’. As we pulled away from our house on First Street in Newtown, she chatted happily, creating wonderful scenarios of times to come. I remember feeling quiet and depressed.

I loved my little town and now that the car was moving, I suddenly felt the consequences of not living there. It dawned on me that I would no longer see Pacific School and my teachers, Mrs. Emery and Mrs. Thompson. Even more, I would miss becoming the long awaited upperclassman of the school and graduating from 8th grade with my classmates.

As we continued down the road past the Cement Plant, more thoughts came rushing. I realized I would never again climb up into the tree house my brother and I built in the dusty eucalyptus trees near the railroad tracks. We loved sitting in the safety of “our fort” while the huge, black train engine would slowly puff beneath us as it pulled filled boxcars from the Cement Plant.

I probably would never again see Lenny Domenicelli’s horses, Pal and Babe, who were corralled near our home. My brother, Macie, my sister, Margo, and I would pet them, feed them rich green weeds that we pulled from the fields, and then finally chase them and each other all over the hillside.

I would miss seeing Georgie Mungai, my very first crush. My Dad bartended at the Ocean View Hotel and we would often stop by with our Mom to visit. Once in awhile, Georgie would drop in and my heart would skip a beat…… my brother , Macie, would tease me and call out “Georgie….Patty loves you!” And I would hit him.

I thought about Catechism class at St. Vincent de Paul’s Church and wondered where I would go for Catechism in Santa Cruz. I thought of many other things.

While my head raced with anxious worries, there whorled in the background the sound of sirens. By this time we had moved onto Highway 1 and were approaching Gregory’s Gas Station. Suddenly, in the distance, I saw smoke on the left hand side of the Highway. My Mom slowed down, and just as we approached the Davenport Cash Store it became evident that it was on fire. I remember having this great feeling of panic and I begged my Mom to stop, to pull over. But we couldn’t stop, she explained, because we had to meet the landlord at our new house, and we were running late. “Don’t worry, honey” she said. “They’ll rebuild it. Davenport can’t be without a grocery store.”

Somehow that didn’t appease me. I knew it didn’t matter, even if they did build a new store. I knew it would never be the same…..not the old Cash Store with its oiled floors, its glass display cases, its hanging sticks of salami and white balls of cheese, and its gasoline pumps outside with the small windows that whirled gas as it was being pumped into waiting cars. As we continued on we kids turned around in our seats and watched through the car‘s rear window as smoke and flames billowed out of the roof of the building. My heart sank. We continued down the Highway towards Santa Cruz in silence and soon we no longer could see the smoke, the hills had gotten in the way. We turned in our seats then and focused on the road ahead. Still no one spoke.

It was a time of transition for us as a family and a long period of ‘breaking away’ for me. I was becoming a teen-ager, yet I wanted so badly to hang onto my childhood. Who wouldn’t want to? I felt so protected in Davenport. I knew everyone and everyone knew me. I had the whole countryside as my playground, and the bright blue sky and the sparkling gray-blue ocean for my times of wonder. Never mind the cement dust that caked our sidewalks and coated our cars. Never mind the wind that fluffed my curly hair into a halo of fuzz around my face. Never mind that we didn’t have a movie house or television reception and that there were no Boys Scout or Brownie Troops. My best friends and favorite playmates were my brother and sisters and we pretty much covered it all. We caught frogs in the small ponds near the railroad tracks; we played pirates and fought bravely with our swords made of wild carrot stalks; we ate sprouts and artichokes fresh picked while we played in the fields….much to our Mother’s disapproval; we were delighted with 10 cents worth of penny candy as a reward for ‘just being good’.

I survived the move, but it took a long time, or what felt to be a long time. I slowly learned ’to be a lady’ and gave up my Tom Boy ways. I adapted to my classroom with as many kids in it as were in the whole of Pacific School in Davenport. I found new friends while my brother went on to play Little League and my sisters joined the Brownies. But, for me, I will never forget my childhood in Davenport. I will never forget who I was when we lived there. Come to think of it, I wouldn’t want to.

Tuesday, December 25, 2007

HATCH MAP - THE 'OLD' COAST ROAD




IVANO FRANCO COMELLI SAYS; Bryan Robinson sent me the above copy the 1859 Hatch Map which depicts 'La Nostra Costa' . ('CLICCA' ON PHOTO FOR ENLARGED IMAGE) Look closely and you will see the route of the 'Old' Coast Road What follows below is the e-mail correspondence between Bryan and 'LaNorma', who has recreated the route of the 'Old' Coast Road on a map of her own. Norma's map is in color and shows some of the old ranches along the coastal route. I have used Norma's map on several of my presentations. It is not, as 'LaNorma' suggests, "crude and amateurish".

Ivano,

Here is a copy of my email to Mrs. Wilson yesterday. Thought you might like to see the copy our correspondence and the attached 1889 Hatch map of the coast. I hope to keep in touch, and hopefully meet in person after the holidays.

I imagine you must know lots of the people--if not all of them!--interviewed in the video taped interviews by Alverda Orlando, "Davenport Oral History Series". I've seen almost all of them now, except those that haven't been available. You may also know my former neighbors in Santa Cruz, John and Marie (Stagnaro) Amin and John Sandes. My daughters used to go next door when they were little to "visit" John or Marie (while she was living--what a sweet lady!), and always got cookies!

Thanks again, Bryan


Dear Bryan:
How wonderful that a young person as yourself is so interested in the Coast (La Costa). Are you from this area?
Would love to know little bit about where you are from, etc. It does our hearts good – people like Ivano and myself
That were born and grew up on the Coast to know that a younger generation is interested in it also. Would love to
Talk to you and also share the map I put together. We could not find a map of the old road anywhere either – only
The internet journey of the new road and coastline. Therefore I did make a map myself although it is rather crude and
Amateurish as I am not a map drawer – however, Ivano and I know the road within our mind with our eyes closed. We
Were on it every day on the schoolbus,etc. I lived further up at 5420 Coast Rd. just before Laguna. So glad you know
The person that lives at Laguna – maybe in the future we can check it out. As you will read in the book – there is such
A history with Laguna and the old Italians and ranchers.

Also would love to see a copy of the map of l889 Hatch map from UCSC that you have a copy of – would you be willing
To share it with us? Anyway – would love to get together with you and Ivano and answer questions and work on the old
Road, etc. – maybe after the holidays in early January 2008?!

Yes I do know but not related to Esther (Frizza) Wilson. She is truly a wonderful, one-of-a-kind person. She and Ivano
Graduated in the same year from SCHS. It truly is a small world and again so happy that you are interested in LaCosta.
So be in touch by e-mail until we can further pursue this in the new year.

Thanks – Norma Dinelli Wilson



Hi Mrs. Wilson,

Thank you for your wonderful message!

I've attached a pieced-together copy of the 1889 Hatch map, which I found at the following link:
http://library.ucsc.edu/maps/hatch.html
I've also seen the actual map in the map library at UCSC. It's huge, about 5 feet by 5 feet.

From your address on Coast Road, it appears that you lived in a house that was formerly "Sarafina's", according to Ivano's book! Wow, I've stopped to look at that house and compared it to the photo in the book!

I don't care how amatuerish your map drawing is, I'd love to see it, and possibly even drive along with you and Ivano to hear your descriptions of the old road's path as well as any other comments you would have!

To answer your question about where I am from, I was born in Palo Alto and "moved" to Mtn. View when I was one day old, the youngest of three boys. My mother grew up in Mtn. View also. Her parents came from N. Dakota and descended from families in Holland, Norway, Germany--some were Mennonites. My father came via San Francisco from Utah. His father came out in 1936 to work as a carpenter on the Golden Gate bridge. His people were primarily Austrian, German, French. I warmly remember working with my paternal grandfather and hearing him talk about working in the fields with the horses and what not. He when it was lunch time, he would say, "Time to put the nose bag on", referring back to when he would put a nose bag on his working horses.

I came to Santa Cruz out of college to work at County Bank. Left town later, then came to regret it. So felt lucky to come back in 1990, worked at S.C. Adult School, now working as a high school counselor in Salinas. And learning about and experiencing the north coast has become a great interest. I feel thoroughly enriched by my adopted connection to the area and its people. Maybe the heart connection I feel relates to my relationship with my grandfather who was living in an era when he worked in the fields, then later worked in plastering--probably used cement from the plant at Davenport! Yet my grandfather relationship must be only a part of what pulls me; there is something that is just very special about LaCosta...

I've enjoyed watching the video taped interviews by Alverda Orlando, "Davenport Oral History Series". I imaging you know most of the people who were interviewed. What a wonderful thing to listen to them talk about people and how things used to be.

I look forward to talking with you and Ivano!

Great to hear from you,
Bryan

THANKS BRYAN AND NORMA. WHAT A WONDERFUL WAY TO START THE NEW YEAR. HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ONE AND ALL. IVANO

Friday, December 07, 2007

THELMA (MICOSSI) GILL- EYEWITNESS REPORT TO THE BURNING OF THE HOTEL D'ITALIA






**Top photo: Part owners of the Hotel: Maria and 'Bepo' Ferlizza with Carabiniere (Francesco Bragazzi)the Gentle Giant. (C. 1935). This is a rare photo of a relatively young, and healthy Carabiniere. Source: Thelma (Micossi) Gill.

Next Photo: The Hotel D'Italia (c. late 1920s or early 1930s), in all its glory.
Notice the roadway winding down the hillside, passing the old Hotel to the front and then winding back up the hill on the other side. State Hwy 1 (Coast Road)now is straight and passes to the rear of where the Hotel used to be located. Photo sent to me by Len Klempnauer.

**Bottom photo: Thelma Micossi (Gill),photographed as a young girl (c.1938), standing at the right. Her mother (my Godmother),Pina Micossi is standing at the left next to Tony Micossi,Thelma's Uncle (my Godfather). Attilio Tomada,better known to us as 'Massimo'(my brother's Godfather), is the tall gentleman standing at the center. Carolina Micossi,my brother's Godmother,is standing behind Thelma. (Carolina was then married to Nardin Micossi [not in photo],Tony Micossi's brother.)At the front wearing a sailor hat,is my bother Giovanni Primo (John). Gervasio Comelli ('Bronco')is seated and hanging on to John. My mother,Valentina, has the cutiest child 'la costa' has ever seen on her lap. Ivano Franco appears a bit bored in this photo. Photo of my baptism,circa 1938, is from the 'La Nostra Costa' Photo Archives.



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IN 'LA NOSTRA COSTA' I WRITE THAT THE HOTEL D'ITALIA IN DAVENPORT WAS A PLACE FOR ITALIAN RANCHERS AND THEIR FAMILIES TO GATHER AND SOCIALIZE. THE HOTEL WAS OWNED AND MANAGED BY FURLANS,-- MY GODMOTHER 'PINA' MICOSSI AND HER HUSBAND FRANK, FRANCESCO BRAGAZZI (CARABINIERE) AND GIUSEPPE 'BEPO' FERLIZZA. DECEMBER 15, THIS YEAR, WILL BE 62ND ANNIVERSARY OF THE TERRIBLE FIRE THAT DESTROYED THE STRUCTURE. THELMA (MICOSSI)GILL (MY FATHER'S GOD DAUGHTER), MAY BE THE LAST SURVIVING EYE WITNESS OF THE FIRE. SHE WAS MOST GRACIOUS TO WRITE HER ACCOUNT OF THAT EVENING FOR READERS OF THE LA NOSTRA COSTA BLOG. THANKS THELMA. -IVANO

Davenport Hotel - Blaze Burns Hotel D’Italia To Ground ----that’s what the Santa Cruz Sentinel Headlines read the day after December 15, 1945.

The Hotel D’Italia was built in 1906, one of the old landmarks of Santa Cruz County. The hotel was completely destroyed by fire on Sunday, December 15, 1945 when defective wiring was believed to have started the blaze in an unoccupied room of the building.

The fire was first noticed about 8:30 p.m. by residents of the area who rushed into the building and traced the smoke coming from behind a locked room. The room was broken into to was found to be a mass of flames. Immediately afterward the lights went out throughout the building.

Three divisions of forestry trucks were called, two from Felton and one from Soquel as well as the Santa Cruz City Fire Dept were all rushed to the scene. The Davenport Voluntary Fire Dept. was on the scene as well as the Fire Chief, Leonard Domenichelli. All these fire departments were unable to stop the flames which tore through the wooden structure, completely burning it to the ground in approximately 45 minutes. The facilities to fight the fire were very inadequate and the water in the main was very low. There were no ramps and water in nearby creeks was unavailable as the streams were too far distant.

The fire was under control by 10:15 p.m. The Fire Departments that were there did prevent the fire from spreading to the nearby blacksmith shop and other stores including butane tanks in the area.

That Sunday night I remember getting ready for school when I heard a knock on the door a man informed me that the hotel was on fire. I immediately let the gentlemen inside and he pointed to where in the building the fire was a blaze. By the time I went out to see where the fire was located and the time I came back inside to inform my mother and all others, the flames were already coming through the hallways. Suddenly all the lights went out, leaving the building in total darkness.

Everyone present seemed to want to help to remove what they thought could be salvaged; however, as I recall it took about 45 minutes for the entire building to come down completely. I remember being near the room where all the liquor was stored and hearing the bottles explode.

As I watched the hotel burning there was so much chaos, but to my surprise there was also so much looting. There were a few residents of the hotel that were in their rooms and had to jump out of their windows to escape the blaze. We had slot machines in the hotel and of course those were salvaged only to find out that they were gone the next day. There was not much that could be salvaged because the intense heat just destroyed everything. The safe was the only thing that remained. It must have been approximately 8 inches of thick steel. After finding the key it was opened to find the silver had melted into a chunk of silver. The paper money was very charred and had to be sent to the mint to be replaced.

That Sunday, we had no where to go; we had to rely on friends to put us up for the night. The Caiocca family certainly was very good friends with my mother and offered whatever they could to her. She stayed with the Caiocca family. I was friends with Yoli Moro and they graciously housed me for over a week. The rest of the people who were residents at the hotel went to the Ocean View hotel to sleep.

My mother owned a house in Davenport but had renters in it and we had to wait for a couple of weeks before we could occupy the house.

The following days we kept visiting the rubbles. My mother now had to begin another life in settling all the problems ahead facing her. She subsequently entered into a partnership with the Caiocca’s at their place of business and opened up an inn where the liquor license could be used.

The Hotel D’Italia was built in 1906 shortly following the San Francisco earthquake, by the Coast Land and Diaries Company of Davenport. Around 1923 it was purchased by my father, Frank Micossi, Frank Bragazzi and Giuseppe Ferlizza from the land company. This era was during prohibition where there was a lot of bootlegging going on. About 1935 the premises were remodeled and were built to include a kitchen, bar, dining room, dance hall, and other accommodations as well as about 65 rooms.

In operation for many years, the large rambling building was partly being used for housing Mexican nationals and Filipinos who were being employed in the fields along the coast in the Davenport area. This was a time when Mexicans would come to work the seasonal crops, Brussels sprouts, artichokes, broccoli. Housing was a problem for these transients. Carabiniere (Frank Bragazzi) and my mother (Josephine Micossi) with the help of Louis Poletti who brought these workers to work in the crops entered into an agreement to rent out approximately 30 rooms, kitchen, common areas to house these workers. The fire started in the area where they were residing.

The insurance amounted to $4,000. This amount now had to be shared with the other two partners – the Frank Bragazzi estate and the Ferlizza estate. The liquor license and beer and wine license was in the name of Josephine Micossi.

But to conclude, these words were said before, “It was a night in infamy” for me. It’s difficult to express what a lifelong impact such a disaster could have on you.

Thelma Micossi Gill


IVANO SAYS; MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ONE AND ALL. DON'T FORGET TO VISIT THE LA NOSTRA COSTA WEBSITE; www.lanostracosta.com-a.googlepages.com





ED IN ITALIANO---- GINO "D'BAFFI" CAMPIONI, TRADUTTORE
Nel libro "La Nostra Costa" scrivo che il Hotel D'Italia in Davenport era un posto per gli ranceri italiani e loro famiglie di fare riunioni e divertimenti. I padroni del hotel erano Furlani Mia madrina "Pina" Micossi e suo marito Frank, Francesco Bragazzi (il Carabiniere) e Giuseppe "Beppo" Ferlizza. Il quindici Dicembre di quest'anno sarà l'anniversario sessanta duesimo di quel fuoco terribile che ha distrutto quell albergo. Thelma (Micossi) Gill (per cui mio padre fu il padrino), potrebbe essere l'ultima sorvivente che vide il fuoco in persona. Essa fu molto graziosa di scrivere suo conto di quella sera per i lettore di La Nostra Costa Blog. Grazie, Thelma. Ivano Davenport Hotel ..Fuoco brucia Hotel D'Italia al suolo. Queste parole apparveno alla capo pagina del giornale Santa Cruz Sentinel, il giorno dopo 15 Dicembre, 1945. Il Hotel D'Italia fu costruito nel 1906, un posto caratteristico della Contea Santa Cruz. Il hotel fu distrutto completamente dal fuoco di domenica, 15 Dicembre, quando credemo che fili elettrici difettosi hanno iniziato il fuoco in una stanza vuota del edificio. Vicini hanno veduto segni del fuoco verso le 8:30 di sera, ed entrando hanno trovato fumo che usciva da una stanza chiusa à chiave. Quando hanno potuto entrare, trovarono la stanza in fiamme. L'elettricità fallì subito nel intero edificio. Tre divisioni di pompieri di foresta furono chiamati, due da Felton ed una da Soquel, insieme dei pompieri da Santa Cruz. I pompieri volontari di Davenport erano subito presente con loro capo, Leonard Domenichelli. Fra tutti questi sulla scena del disastro, non trovarono mezzo di fermare le fiamme che saltarono fra tutta la struttura di legno, bruciandola completamente al suolo entro 45 minuti. Gli equipaggi per combattere il fuoco non bastarono per un fuoco così grosso, e la pressione di acqua era molto debole. I fiumi erano troppo distanti. I fuoco fu finalmente controllato alle 10:15. Almeno i pompieri hanno potuto fermare il fuoco che non incendiasse il negozio del fabbro ed altri posti vicini, incluso anche parecchi serbatoi di gaz fiammabile. Quella Domenica mi ricordo che mi preparavo per andare alla scuola, quando senti un uomo bussando alla porta. Era un uomo che mi ha informato che l'osteria era in fiamma. Subito lo ho fatto entrare e mi ha indicato dove era il fuoco. Dal tempo che lo vedevo e che sono tornata in casa per informare mia madre e gli altri, le fiamme gia entravano tutti i corridoi. Poi le luce erano spente, lasciando tutto l'edificio nello scuro. Tutti presente sembravano di volere levare tutte le cose che potrebbero essere salvate, ma mi ricordo che in 45 minuti tutto l'edificio era completamente distrutto. Mi ricordo essendo vicino la stanza dove erano i liquori e sentire l'esplosioni delle bottiglie. Mentre guardavo quando bruciava l'osteria, c'era tanta confusione, ma ero sorpresa che c'era anche tanto saccheggio. C'erano dei residenti del albergo che erano nelle loro camere ed ebbero da saltare dalle finestre per scappare il fuoco. Avevamo macchinette da gioco nel albergo, e naturalmente quelle furono salvate, poi scoprire che il giorno dopo erano scomparse. Non c'era tanto da salvare, perchè il calore aveva distrutto quasi tutto. La cassa forte era l'unica cose che rimaneva. Era composta di acciaio molto massiccio. Dopo trovare la chiave per aprirla si trovò che l'argento era diventato un solo pezzo. La moneta di carta era tutta nera e fu necessario di remandarla alla zecca per farla scambiare. Quella Domenica eravamo senza casa. Abbiamo dovuto dipendere con amici per darci posto per dormire la notte. La famiglia Caiocca erano certamente buoni amici ed hanno offerto qualunque aiuto per mia madre. Essa stette con la famigila Caiocca. Io avevo amicizia con Yoli Moro e loro mi hanno tenuto in loro casa per piu di una settimana. Il restante degli residenti al'osteria sono andati al Ocean View Hotel per dormire. Mia madre aveva una casa in Davenport, ma era occupata e abbiamo dovuto aspettera due settimane avanti che la potremmo occupare da noi. I giorni seguenti visitavamo spesso le rovine. Mia madre ora debbe cominciare unaltra vita, per risolvere tutti i problema che aveva di fronte. Poi entrò in compagnia con i Caiocca nel loro negozio, ed apri un osteria con sua licensa da vendere liquore. Il Hotel D'Italia fu costruito nel 1906, poco dopo il terremoto di San Francisco, dalla agenzia Coast land and Dairies Company di Davenport. Circa 1923 fu comprato da mio padre, Frank Micossi, Frank Bragazzi, e Giuseppe Ferlizza dalla agenzia. Questa era l'epoca di proebizione (di alcole) e c'era tanto traffico di contrabbando. Circa 1935 il sito fu ricostruito per includere cucina, bar, sala da cena, e da ballo, con circa 65 altre stanze. Operato per tanti anni, il grande edificio era usato in parte per Messicani e Flilppini cui erano impiegati dagli agricoltori nella zona di Davenport. In quei tempi i Messicani venivano per cogliere verdure della stagione, cavolini di Bruscelle, carcioffi, broccoli. Trovare case per questi lavoranti di passaggio era un problema. Carabiniere (Frank Bragazzi) e mia madre (Josephine Micossi) con l'aiuto di Louis Poletti, che fece venire questi lavoranti, fecero d'accordo di fornire circa 30 stanze con cucina e salotti per quei lavoranti. I fuoco cominciò nel posto che occupavano. L'assicurazione fu $4,000. Questa somma ora debbe essere condivisa con gli altri due compagni, le tenute di Frank Bragazzi e di Ferlizza. La licenza per liquore e birra era nel nome di Josephine Micossi. Ma per finire, queste parole furono dette prima, "Era una notte infama" per me. Lo trovo difficile esprimere che effetto lungo e brutto un disatro di questo genere puo fare. Thelma Micossi Gill Ivano dice, Non dimentircare di visitare La Nostra Costa sul Internet. www.lanostrascosta.com-a.googlepages.com

Sunday, December 02, 2007

HAPPY BIRTHDAY - SUZANNE




Today is Dec 2. It is my youngest daughter’s birthday. The photo above of the ‘hairy’ policeman and Suzanne was taken circa 1978. (I think long sideburns were in.) Suzanne is wearing my policeman’s hat, which was actually stolen from me when I was have my evening meal at Original Joe’s in San Jose, -but that’s another story.

Those of you who have read ‘La Nostra Costa” are already familiar with the following episode. However, Suzanne has never forgiven me for inserting her into the book as a mere endnote. Never mind that it was a rather extensive endnote (LNC: p.157). So, my dear baby girl, we will republish it here at the “Top of the Blagga”.

The endnote in question actually referred back to a childhood incident that occurred on the Gulch Ranch ‘su per la costa’ (LNC. p.151). As I relate in the book, I and a boyhood friend played a prank on my older brother and my friend’s older brother. We placed chopped garlic in their drinking glasses and then filled the glass prior to their sitting down at the noon day meal. When the two boys finally ‘hit bottom” and tasted the garlic they ‘exploded’ in anger. Before they could get to us, we were saved by our mothers’ who ‘exploded’ in laughter. It was a great ‘gotcha’ prank and a lot of fun. The endnote as it pertains to Suzanne follows.

*Not so much fun some years later, when my daughter Suzanne, then about six years old, turned the table on me, so to speak. Apparently she had gotten this idea from watching cartoons on television. As I was working at my desk at home, she came in and served an orange liquid in a tall glass. Not paying much attention and thinking that it was fresh juice, I took a big swallow, only to realize, too late, that it was liquid soap. I didn’t blow bubbles as she had anticipated, but I think I did foam a bit at the mouth. Suzanne broke out laughing. On the other hand, I didn’t do much laughing as I chased her around the house. Now I knew how the two older boys must have felt. Come to think of it, I would have preferred that “garlic cocktail.”Happy Birthday Suzanne and remember , as I learned the hard way, “what goes around, eventually comes around” Love: Daddy Ivan

*Copyrighted by Ivano Franco Comelli, and appears in his book “La Nostra Costa” (Our Coast) published by Authorhouse; www.authorhouse.com

Saturday, November 24, 2007

LA NOSTRA COSTA BOOK REVIEW BY THE CANADIAN FURLAN




Top Photo: Tre Famiglie Furlani taken on the Gulch Ranch,'su per la costa',c.1947. ' (LNC: Page 139). Standing (L-R)Guido Cantarutti,Evelina Cantarutti,'Bronco'Comelli, Mario (Rosso) Taurian and Valentina Comelli. Seated (L-R)Lido Cantarutti,Reno Cantarutti, Elso Taurian, Felicino (Phil)Taurian,Giovanni Primo (John) Comelli, and Ivano Franco Comelli. My brother Johln is holding "Copi" our third family dog. Unknown if he was a Furlan.

Bottom Photo: My Aunt Lina (Bressani)Gemignani taken in Italy,c.1942. This was prior to being taken prisoner by the Nazi SS. (LNC: P.187)



Ivano:


I just finished reading your awesome book "La Nostra Costa". My rating is 10 out of 10. You can be rest assured that I will honourably advertise your book. You can be guaranteed of that.

There were a few sections of the book that greatly impressed me. The section regarding your Aunt Lina Bressani (Gemignani) I am guessing Lina is about my Father's age born in 1924? Well her experiences after the war were not uncommon. My mother recalled in her home town of Bressa di Campoformido Udine, many local girls had their hair cropped off by the Partisans because they were seen even speaking to a German Soldier. Also, it was also well known that there were numerous individuals within the ranks of the Partigiani that were also devious and felt they were above the law,stealing and pilfering from their neighbours. There were numerous reported incidences that certain individuals of the Partigiani also tortured German Soldiers as well as their own people in the local towns. Just because they were Partigiani did not make them holy.

There were some real characters in their ranks as well. My Mother's two older brothers were both Police Officers during the War, as a matter of fact Amelio the oldest was one of the many selected to guard Mussolini when he was imprisoned after 1943 when King Emanuel ordered Benito interned and Italy formed an alliance with the Allies. Well my Uncles were always threatened by the local, lower ranking Partigiani, because being Police Officers they were automatically perceived to be Fascists since it was a state held position. However, no-one knew this at the time but both my Uncles joined the Partigiani prior to 1941, they were all given the orders to do so, since the demise of Italy was seen by all ,except for Benito and his band of merry hoodlums.

And as your Father Bronco mentions many times what the Partigiani did to Mussolini was not well received. Bronco was correct "Che brutta figura che questi Italiani fanno" the Allies certainly were not in favour of this sickly display of law and order. Again as was evidently seen after the war the Partigiani themselves were not united, this was evident during the after war referendum and subsequent interim democratic government elections. There were two facets of Partigiani, the Communist facet and the Christian Democratic facet. Italy was divided well after the War and did not truly find it's bases until the 1970's, economically this was very evident. And I can attest to this having lived in Italy from 1967 - 1968, the economy was still in a restructuring mode, and did not compare to the rich productive North American example.

By the way your Aunt Lina still lives in California? It would be interesting to meet her, I know my Father and Mother would love it.

The other most impressive part of La Costa Nostra is your thorough recollection of all your family friends and the various outings. They are similar to my experiences. Also, what Bronco experienced with Peter Rinaldi(LNC: P.98), was similar to what my father experienced. One thing for certain and this holds true anywhere in the World where Furlans live, Furlans are hard working non pretentious honest people. And they are basic, not showing off what they have even if they have $1million dollars.

Excellent reading, thoroughly enjoyed it... keep in touch !!!


Ciao e Mandi

Doriano "The Canadian Furlan"


FOR MORE "LA NOSTRA COSTA" BOOK REVIEWS VISIT WEBSITE AT:
www.lanostracosta.com-a.googlepages.com

Saturday, November 17, 2007

ITALIAN FAMILY NAMES - 'La Nostra Costa'


LA NOSTRA COSTA SPECIAL THANKSGIVING GIFT FROM GINO "D'BAFFI ED ADA" CAMPIONI. I AM SURE THE NAMES WILL REMIND 'BLAGGA FANS' OF MANY FOND MEMORIES ESPECIALLY DURING THIS TIME OF YEAR. SOME OF THE NAMES I HAVE INCLUDED IN 'LA NOSTRA COSTA'. REGRETFULLY, TOO MANY NAMES WERE NOT INCLUDED. ALSO,GINOS LIST IS NOT ALL INCLUSIVE. I AM SURE THAT MANY OF YOU HAVE ADDITIONAL NAMES AND MEMORIES THAT SHOULD BE ADDED TO THE LIST. PLEASE ADD FAMILY NAMES IN COMMENTS SECTION OR E-MAIL IVANO DIRECT: ivcomelli@ymail.com  WILL ADD TO THE LIST. WHAT A WONDERFUL WAY TO KEEP THE MEMORIES OF SANTA CRUZ AND 'LA COSTA' ALIVE. HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERYONE. IVANO (BTW: HOW MANY AMICI DELLA COSTA CAN YOU PICK-OUT IN THE PHOTO ABOVE. PHOTO TAKEN AT THE DEL PIERO RANCH IN WATSONVILLE, C.1948.)

Ciao, Ivano

Last night I made this list of Italians living in or around Santa Cruz when we also lived there, or who served us in various ways. I include brief remembrances of some. Of several I can recall only the surname.

Perhaps in your further writings, you might recall significant things about some of them:

Allegretti. This couple had a son about my age, and lived in the Seabright district.
Allegrini, Aldo Elio Dr. Physician and surgeon with an office on Soquel Ave. and a home in Pasatiempo.(167)
Antonetti, Joe and wife Noemi lived near Holy Cross Church and had a daughter (Virginia) whose name I have forgotten.Owner-partner in the Gulch Ranch.(100)

Anzilotti, Alex "Sprouts": . He had a produce trucking company that went from Portland to Santa Cruz, the biggest at that time. He took on a partner and lost his share in a card game to his partner, Joe Antonetti, I think. He was a field buyer for John Ingalls frozen foods, we would go to Stockton or Salinas in the late 50's.
Anzilotti, Julia (Foster):  Daughter of Alex "Sprouts" Anzilotti. 
Auricchio,
Hi 
My name is David Raymond Brown (Auricchio) 
My family has been in Santa Cruz since before I was even a thought. 
It would be great to see the name Auricchio added. Today we are the Brown's, Bortz's , and Franco's.
We came here from Huntington island, Olean, and Buffalo NY. 
our family back in IT make cheese,
Auricchio provolone is most well known, we're all cooks. I said cooks not kooks, although a few of us have been given that label as well.
Thank you 

Bandoni, Armando, frequent visitor who drove an artichoke green colored Dodge coupe.
Bandini, Leo, worked his tail off for Pino Pyffer. Ivano used to see him working on his tractor, Sundays and Holidays. Didn't seem he ever took a day off.
Bardoni, Gina. Wife of Henry Costella. (See Costella, below.)
Bargiacchi, Giulio and Emma, parents of Donald Don graduated from SCHS in 1952 with John Comelli. (337)
Bargiacchi,Pietro and Ida, parents of Flora and Leo. (213)
Basso,Vittorio, Also known as Vittorio 'Del Belvedere'. John Comelli's Godfather (Confirmation). Furlan (355)
Battistini, John and Angie who helped many Italians with insurances.(259)
Bazzali, (given name forgotten) who cut and delivered firewood.
Bella,Charlie and Carmelina, owners of the Ocean View Hotel in Davenport. Famous for their 'Wild Game Feasts." (112)
Belli, a couple living on Toledo St. with a son Ennio.
Beltrami,Battista and Serafina, mother of Ebbe and Angie. Managed 'Beltrami's' a Bar/Cafe/Gasoline Station, mid-way between Davenport and Santa Cruz.(221)
Beltrami, Luigi was a partner with Herman Mortara in the grocery on Pacific Ave.
Benedetti, Eraldo and Emma, parents of Jeanette. Rancere on a farm just north of the Gulch Ranch. Jeanette attended Laurel School with Ivano. (273)
Bertacca,Teresa, Aunt to Patty Morelli. Co-Plaintiff in civil suit against the Portland Cement Plant in Davenport. (26)
Bertorelli, Nello who had a grocery at the corner of Younglove Ave. and Mission St.
Bianchi, an officer in Bank of America on Pacific Ave.
Bianco, Edorado and Mary. Parents of Florence Bianco Bell. Edorado ranched with brother-in-law Michaele Conrado in a place the Italiani della costa called "Siberia" (located in Swanton-'su per la costa').

Bianco, Florence (see above), went to school with Ivano. (324).
Bianconi.Guido and Irene,parents of Diane. Operated Bianconi Produce. Irene helped run resturant in family home in Swanton. Known as the Red House on Swanton Road it later was converted into the 'Seaside School' were Reno Cantarutti once attended
(355). The building still stands today.
Bianconi, Rosie and Tony, Grandparents to Diane (above). Lived on Laurel St. SC.

Binsacca,Sam, Esteemed Santa Cruz High School Teacher. Taught many Future Farmers 'su per la costa'. Father to Bob and Don. Don graduated from SCHS in 1955, with Ivano.
Boggero,Joe,Music Teacher and Piolet of Piper Family Cruiser. Thought accordion lessons.
Bosso,Lina, worked at Bosso Bros. Hardware at the foot of Mission St. before Costella and Caiocca acquired it.
Braida, G. and Marcellina, parents of Lina.
Bragazzi,Francesco (Carabiniere), Part owner and manager of the Hotel D'Italia in Davenport. At one time also managed the Laguna Inn. His stature,(he stood over 6'6"tall,and weighed well over 260 lbs.)and menacing looks made him the ideal 'peacemaker' for the bars he worked.  (107)
Bregante, Maureen, attended grade school with Gino
Bressani, Angelina,(Furlana) Mother of Valentina and Lina;grandmother to John and Ivano

Bucchi: Umberto and Derna . He had a share of the ranch for a short time in the 50s. They had two children, Roberto who worked for my Father at Lucca Lunch and later had his own bar. I believe it was called Gi Gi's. He had a sister who's name is Elvera.  Virginia Antonetti Silva

Comelli. Immigrate from Italy to the US circa 1955 at the age of 68. Died and was buried at Holy Cross Cemetary, Santa Cruz in 1980 at the age of 93. (3)(317)
Bressani,Lina, (Furlana)Nazi prisoner of war, war bride. Youngest sister of Valentina Comelli. Aunt to Ivano and John. Married Joe Gemignani in 1948. (187)(199)
Brovia, Pietro and Maria, parents of 'The Davenport Destroyer' Joe 'Pino' Brovia and his twin sister, Virgina, and younger sister Lena. Lived in Newtown (Davenport)and later in Santa Cruz (119)
Brovia,Joe, Pacific Coast League Baseball Hall of Famer. Played for the San Francisco Seals,Oakland Oaks,Portland Beavers and Sacramento Solons. Also played for the Cincinati Reds in the Majors.(119)
Busticchi, A member of Holy Cross High

Caiocca,Gilbert and Mary. Parents of William and Leo. Own and managed the Davenport Bakery and later the Mirmar Cafe in Davenport. (111)
Caiocca, Wm. a partner of Joe Costella in a hardware store on Mission St. and a TV & appliance store on Soquel Ave. (111)
Campioni,Gulielmo (Baffi) and Ada, parents of Gino 'Bobby'Campioni. Baffi,a rather eccentric rancere, was a partner on the Gulch Ranch with 'Bronco' Comelli. He loved his minestroni soup.(91)
Campioni,Gino "Bobby'. Son of 'Baffi' ed Ada. Famous author of the "Itanglish" Dictionary.
Capone,Alphonso (Al). Chicago Gangster (1920s 1930s). Associated 'su per la costa' with "Bootlegged booze". (5)

Cardoza, Zelma, wife or Raymond Fambrini
Carcello,Fred, Owner operator of Mission Pharmacy, cornor of Mission and Bay.
Carmarlinghi Family. Own and managed 'Adolphs' a popular Resturant and Bar in Santa Cruz. (75)
Cantarutti,Guido and Evelina,parents of Reno,Lido and Norma. Rancere on the Venturini Ranch 'su per la Costa'. During the War he moved his family to Richmond. Good friends of the Comelli Family. Furlans. (140)
Carnera, Primo (Furlan), Heavyweight Boxing Champion of the World 1933-34. (90) Hero to 'Bronco' Comelli and other ranceri, 'su per la costa'.
Carniglia, Mary who prepared income tax returns for many Italians.
Cavalli,(Charlie and Prince) Two of the hardest working 'ranceri' on the Gulch Ranch. Unknown for sure if they were Italian. (71-74)
Ceragioli,Raymond and Zelda, parents of Rudy,Jim and Barbara. Lived on the Lorenzi Ranch then on Escalona Drive in Santa Cruz. Zelda was one of 6 Fistolera Sisters who were born and raised "su per la Costa": Inez,Lena,Nora,Vivian,Winnie,Zelda. (248)
Cerri,Tony and Albina. Parents of Gloria. Lived on the Lorenzi Ranch (245)
Cerri,Gloria. As a teenager she kept us informed as to the happenings 'su per la costa". Later married Sam Torrisi and moved to San Jose.(246)
Cecchini,Alma. A member of my grade school,later a teller at Bank of America on Mission St.
Chiorini,J.L.,Accountant,Mayor of Santa Cruz,c.1950.
Cimarelli,Luigi. Owner of a plumbing business in Santa Cruz.
Cirincione, Domenico. I'm not sure if he represented "L'Italia" newspaper or if he was the olive oil vender.
Cirrone, "il calzolaio" operated a shoe repair shop on Pacific Ave.
Comelli, Gervasio (Bronco) and Valentina (Furlans), parents of Giovanni and Ivano.(3)
Comelli, 'Garrasio', name assigned to Gervasio at Ellis Island in 1923.(4)
Comelli, Giovanni (John)and Donna, parents of Denise and Christine,elder brother to Ivano. Lived on the Gulch Ranch and in Santa Cruz. (7)
Comelli, Ivano Franco, Policeman, 'Famous' Author. (all)
Conrado, Michele and Caterina, parents to Attilio, John and Angela (also see Bianco, Edorado, above.)

Conrado, Paul*
Corno,Jimmy, mechanically enclined rancere who worked on the Gulch Ranch (67)
Conrado,Paul*
Costella, Amedeo operated The Workingman's Store on Front St.

Costella, Egidio and Lucia (Bertorelli). Grandparents to Bonnie and Carol Costella, etc. Father to John ( Carol's, Jacks's and Patricia's father) Malfada and Henry (Bonnie's and Betty's Father).
Tranquillo (Frank) brother to Egdio. Cement contractors, lived on Emeline St. Santa Cruz . Children: Reno, Adolfph, and Irene (Penniman)
Costella, Henry (see above). Married Gina Bardoni
Costella, Joe, partner with Wm. Caiocca in businesses.(111)

Grossi,Settimo and Inez (Fistolera). Parents of Lea. Had ranch just north of the Gulch.((252)

Dal Porto,Jimmy, Famous 'su per la costa' for playing his accordion at weddings,Laguna Picnics and major Italin Festivals. (235)
DeBenedetti,John (Jack),esteemed rancere and land owner 'su per la costa'. Son Jay graduated from SCHS in 1955 with Ivano. (54)
Del Chiaro, Lisandro and Effie, parents of Marvin and Dolores. Own a small farm on North-end of Santa Cruz. Marvin was Ivano's room mate at SJS. (273)
Degli Esposti, Luigi and Vanda, parents of Roberto and Fabrizio.(204)
Del Piero,Timo and Catharina, parents, of Rita,Aurura,and Richard. Good friends of the Comelli Family. Timo started farming 'su per la Costa' then moved to Castroville and finally to Watsonville where he farmed on an Apple Ranch near Pinto Lake. (Furlans)
Della Santina,Dominico (Lambari) and Nora (Fistolera). Parents to Louis,Ricco and Paul. A partner with Pina Micossi,managing the Mirmar Cafe in Davenport.(111)

DellaMora, Joseph 'Joey', beloved son of Steve and Anne (Freeman) DellaMora, Grandson of Joe DellaMora, died tragically in a drowning accident on the Family Ranch (The Old Lorenzi Property} "su per la costa" 7-21-2011, age 18.
DeLucca,Amerigo and Matilda (Brovia),parents to Marie, Anthony ,Dolores,and Madonna (Donna).
Entire family envolved in Traffic Accident with Fire Truck just north of Davenport. Amerigo,Anthony,and Madonna were killed. Others seriously injured. (291)
DiMaggio,Joe; New York Yankee Hall of Fame Baseball player. Hero to Joe Brovia and other youngsters growing up 'su per la costa'. (146)
Dimeo,Fred. Original member of the "Figli di Ferro" . Good Friend to Joe Gemignani. Dimeo Lane 'su per la costa' bears his family name. (178) (184-5)
Dinelli,Dante and Diana, parents of Norma. Ranceri on the Lorenzi Ranch,off the Coast Rd., 5mi north of Santa Cruz.(249)

Dogliotti, Bartolomeo "Pete" and Maria, parents of Attilio Joseph. Attilio lost his life while serving as a Flight Lieutenant in WW II.
Dughi,Silvio and Catherina, parents of Guiliano. Worked for the Salz Tannery in Santa Cruz.
Facelli,Lou,owner operator of "Facelli's" a popular Santa Cruz Resturant (formally 'Micossi's'), located off of Mission Street near Natural Bridges.
Fadelli, Battista and Candida, parents of John who was a high ranking officer in the Merchant Marine. After the passing of Battista, Candida
moved to Bay St. and had a house full of priceless furnishings sent from the Far East by John.
Fambrini,John and Margaret (Dimeo). Parents of Raymond and Nadine. Foreman of the Gulch Ranch for awhile, then managed family (Dimeo)ranch near "Il Dumpo". (39)

'Fava', nickname of man on "La Nostra Costa Book Cover" standing alongside 'Carabiniere'. Unknown what is real name was. (116)
Ferlizza,Maria and 'Pepo'. Furlans. Part owners of the Hotel D'Italia (107)
Ferrari,Battista (John)and Antonietta,parents to Effie, maternal grand parents to Marvin and Delores Del Chiaro
Ferrari,Dave, "Il Fiorista" of Santa Cruz. Also one of the best accordionist ever heard by Gino. The other being Attilio Dogliotti.
Fraboni, a jeweler with a shop on Pacific Ave. Gino showed him a ring that he had bought in Italy,and from across the room he identified it as having been made on the Ponte Vecchio in Firenze.
Franceschini,Francesco and Nuncia, parents to Tony and Rita. Foreman of the Marina Ranch,'su per la costa'. Francesco was severely burned in 1940 in farming mishap.
(298)
Frizza, Esther. Went to school with Ivano. Unknown to Ivano at the time she had family ties to "La Nostra Costa".
(324)
Fumetto: Nickname of a 'cookahousa' cook 'su per la costa' Married to 'Fumetta'. Real names unknowned.
Garbini, Mike and Rose who lived on Otis St. Rose was a very saintly lady.
Garibotti, Enrico Dr. who had a medical office on Pacific Ave. opposite the town clock. Died after eating poisoned mushrooms.
Gemignani,Aladino and Argentina,parents of Constantino,Lido and Joe. Aladino was a partner with 'Bronco' Comelli on the Gulch Ranch. Famous for his 'cookahousa' cusine. (18)
Gemignani,Costantino (Augie) and Victoria(Ghio),parents to Aladina and Donna. Augie is the oldest of the Gemignani Brothers and is still living today in Santa Cruz.(176)

Gemignani,Joe and Lina , parents of Dino and Joanne. Ivano's Uncle by marriage to Valentina's youngest sister, Lina Bressani. Original member of the 'Figli di Ferro' a motorcycle group 'su per la Costa". (175)

Ghio, Teresa, a member of my grade school classes.
Giudici,Anita*
Guerino,last name unknown. Killed in traffic accident on Gianone Hill (Swanton),c.1927. Ivano's father 'Bronco'Comelli who was a passenger in the vehicle,survived the accident. (355)


GREGORY, FRANCIS AND ALVIN. Operated Gregory Country Store and Gas Station in Davenport (359)

Iacopetti, Luigi and Mary, owned property in Bonny Doon where 'Italiani della Costa' used to picnic and socialize. Managed small grocery store and bar which now houses the Bonny Doon Vineyard Tasting Room. (149)

LaBarba, Fidel, Flyweight Boxing Champion, c.1930. Contemporary of Primo Carnera, Heavyweight Champion of the world. Submitted by son, F. John LaBarba of Santa Cruz.

Landino, John  Owner of Landino Construction Company. Cut the Comelli family home "su per la costa", and transported it to 1505 Bulb Ave in Capitola were it still stands today. (102)

Landino, Gene, John Landino's son. Went to Laurel School with Ivano.
Landino, Tony, brother of John Landino.
Lazzarini,Mario, rancere, cacciatore. Used to hang around 'Serafina's'(234)
Lazzarotti
Locatelli,Sal, Santa Cruz Woodsman Supreme. Father of Richard,Danieland Sal J.
Lucchesi,Amedeo and wife Mary (Modolo). Amedeo was killed on the Normandy Front in 1944.
Luchetti, Arcangelo "Tato" and Pia whose sons Carlo and Henry (Enrico) became chemical engineers, and worked at Aames Research Center at Moffet Field. They lived in Mountain View, but visited Santa Cruz frequently (Ada once stated that if she had married Tato Linstead of Baffi she would have had some great children, instead of this "barbagianni".) (that's me)
Lunardini, P.

Maceo,E.J., Grower and Shipper, 'su per la costa' , Father of Ralph Maceo.
Maceo, Ralph (see above). Brussel Sprouts, etc. Shipper 'su per la costa. Bought out the Santa Cruz Sprout Growers' Facility on the North Side of Santa Cruz.


Manildi, Barbara


Maranta, Patricia*
Marciano,Rocky, Heayweight Boxing Champion of the Word c.1955. (152) Boyhood hero of Ivano and many Italian American youths "su per la costa".
Marcuzzi,Tony and Alvira. Tony worked many years for Phyffer Bros. He was Ivano's godfather (confirmation). Made his own wine in his garage. Furlan (70)

Marenghi, Ernest, Santa Cruz Police Officer
Marenghi, Joe, Cement Business
Marenghi, Louie, Grocery Business, Camp Evers (Scotts Valley)
Martini, Paul and Frances, who lived on Toledo St.
Mazza (Sledgehammer). Nickname of rancere on the Gulch Ranch who was wrongly accused of messing up Argentina Gemignani's zucchini garden. (271)
Mazzei,Ottavio and Pia, parents of Eugene,and a daughter whose name I have forgotten. Eugene went to Laurel School with Ivano. (172)
Meschi, Italo and Bianca, parents of Ida who lived at 19 Baldwin St. Ida later married Donald Mungai.
Mello,Betty*
Micossi,Frank and Pina, parents of Thelma. Furlans who managed the Hotel D'Italia, in Davenport. Pina was Godmother to Ivano Comelli. (4)
Micossi,Tony(Furlan)and Rosie (Fusari), parents of Frank and Rina. Operated the Elkhorn Resturant in Pescadero. Also the Swiss Hotel and Micossi's in Santa Cruz. Tony was Ivano Comelli's BaptismalGodfather. (129)
Micossi,Frank, son of Tony and Rosie (Fusari),brother to Rina. Captain who served in Italy during WWII (132)
Micossi,Nardin and Carolina; parents to Rosina. Nardin was the brother of Tony Micossi. Carolina was John Comelli's, baptismal god-mother.

Mondo, Mario. A sarto? (tailor)
Modina,Charlie and Theresa (Dimeo). Live in the old Dimeo "ccokahouse" located on Dimeo Lane, just before you get to 'Il Dumpo'(209)(214). Theresa was Margret Fambrini and Fred Dimeo's sister. Charlie ran a Trucking Firm located near his home near Dimeo Lane.
Modolo, Frank and Rozina, parents of Johnny and Mary. Johnny was killed (age 20) when he was thrown from a cow he was riding. The whole Coast mourned. (356)
Moro Lou and Enes (Peracchi),parents of Donna and Sandy. Donna married John Comelli in 1962. (329)
Moro,Silvio and Elena,parents of Ferd,Freddie Moro,Mary and Yoli. Furlans. (143)
Moro, Ferd, original member or the motorcycle group "Figli Di Ferro". (186)
Moro, Fred, Past President of the Marconi Club in Santa Cruz. (143)
Mortara, Herman who operated a grocery on Pacific Ave. with Beltrami.
Morelli,Mac and Evelyn. Parents of Mac and Patty. Once managed the Mirmar Cafe in Davenport with Pina Micossi. (111)

Morotti,Laurence. He and Gino worked at picking blue berries together, until Gino got fed up with the very slow progress and little pay. A girl, Gino refuses to name, tried to beat the system by filling up her baskets with dirt,then covering them with berries,thus making much faster progress. She did not know that the baskets were weighed. She was quickly sent home. Gino and Laurence were driven to the blueberry fields in a post-war Hudson "Terraplane" (driver unknown); the car you step down into, which was wider at the top than the bottom, and had an electric gear shifter with a ridiculously small lever mounted on the steering column.

Mosso & Puccinelli, automobile dealers.
Mungai,Dino and Edith. Parents of Jerry and Donald. Lived and worked on the Mungai Ranch. (272)

Mungai, Antonietta, sister of Albert, Angelo, Bartolomeo, Giovanni, Joe, Leo Tambellini. Raised her family in Santa Cruz: Eugene (Gene) Mungai, Dino Mungai, Fred Mungai, Nina Vaggioli, Josephine Ghio, Angelo Mungai and Albert Mungai.


Mussolini,Benito. Italian Dictator, 1922-45. Sided with Adolph Hitler in WWII. His decision negatively effected many Italians living 'su per la costa'. (133)(146)(187)(197)


Neri, Quinto and Elvira, parents of Laura. Part-owner of the Gulch Ranch. (229)

Netto, Manuel and Edith (Portuguese), Father and Mother of Phil, Lori and Dave. Lived across the Street from Ivano on Seaside Street in Santa Cruz. (307)
Nicolosi,  Paul and Elliei, and their son Paul. Ellie was the younger sister of Gina Tori and Noemi Antonetti.
Oddone, Alfonso and Lorenza. They lived on Trescony St. and our (Gino's) back yards were separated by a wooden fence. She made the best ravioli in the world. Alfonso was another who helped me (Gino) learn to drive, besides Augie, Mark Olsen, and Bianca Meschi.
Ottaviano, Johnny, the Studebaker dealer whose son Johnny (chachie) was in my class at Holy Cross High School
Panattoni, Dolores, went to grade school with Gino.
Parodi, a barber. The first to cut my hair.

Paterni, Angelo "Nino" and Helen (Tambellini). For many years, Nino worked a brussel sprouts ranch near Davenport, then at the Cement Plant. Raised five daughters (Terri Gregory, Toni Schwab, Jerri Tupper, Jacki Pipolo and Lorri Evans).
Pesce, Shirley*
Peracchi,Emo, Son of Velia Peracchi,brother to Enes Moro. Former Santa Cruz Policeman and Harbor Master at Santa Cruz Harbor.(330)
Perlino. Mr. Perlino raised chickens and sold them from his place on California Ave.
Petrocchi, Arcangelo and Niccolina who had a cherry orchard and also raised pigs East of town.
Petroni, Salvatore and Alaide, parents of Anna, who lived on Soquel Ave.
Pianavilla,Pete,famous for his 'booming' voice and his verbal assaults on the Game Warden, Forrest McDermott.(223)
Pini, Gino, the chief of police
Podio. I can't remember any more about him.
Poletti, Luigi and various member of the Poletti family.
Pollastrini
Pori, Carlo who had a shoe repair business on Pacific Ave. near the plaza. (father of Merle Janet in my kindergarten and grade school classes)
Presepi, Amerigo (Piccino) and Luisa. She worked as a telephone operator. Piccino was a partner with Bronco Comelli on the Gulch Ranch. Under his leadership (c.1940) the ranch became known as "Il Rancio dei Pompieri." "The Ranch of the Fireman". (38)

Prolo,Eugene,owner manager of Prolo Chevrolet in Santa Cruz. The Comelli Family bought a brand new gun-metal grey' 1949 Chevrolet from his dealership.(96)


Pfyffer, Fred. Swiss entrepreneur, land owner, former President of Coast Dairies and Land Company. Along with brother Pino, owned and operated Pyffer Bros. Packing and Shipping Company located off of Mission Street on the north end of Santa Cruz. (75)
Pfyffer, Pino (see above). Was foreman of the Pfyffer Ranches "su per la Costa" .

Quartararo : add the Quartararos'   My grandfather, Vincent, had quite a history in rum/booze smuggling during Prohibition, was part of a a fish processing operation (Santa Cruz Processors) along with my Uncle Lou and his 11 children (there are 7 kids on our side of the family.  My Dad "Vince" was a Podiatrist in SC for probably 50 years (he died in 2008(?) at the age of 92 and our family is still in the phone book.  Jeff Dunne knows the history....we proudly would see my grandfather's picture on the wall at Gilda's  titled A Day on the Bay....  >> Rod Quartararo


Quilici, Emilio and Elena.

Raffin,Frederico,a Furlan and Norma (Rocchi),parents of Peter and Richard. In a very distressing incident, which occurred in 1947, Frederico shot and killed his wife Norma. (290)
Raffanti, Enrico Dr. a dentist.
Ramacciotti, Dante and Assunta. He worked on the Gulch Ranch and she was the cook for a time.(181)
Reggiarda, Luisa. She lived on Trescony St.
Rinaldi, Giovacchino and Amelia, parents of Vasco, Velia, Evelina, and Martino (Raymond) who lived on Mission St. near Olive St.
Rinaldi, Pietro and Rina, parents of Alma, Sally, and Giulio.(98)
Rinaldi, Rinaldo and Maria, parents of Reno and Neva.(234)
Rinaldi, Ulisse
Rodoni, Dante and Andreina, parents of Mario, Elio, and Jeannie.(202)

Rossi, Albie; Member of the Figli di Ferro" motorcycle group. Later a rancher and land owner 'su per la costa'. Once owned "IL Buco" on the Gulch Ranch. (178)(368)
Rossi, Matilde, a clerk in the county courthouse.

Santos,Don, father of Don Jr., Betty and Alice. Dairy man, Coastal Milk Man.(P.19;24). Non-Italian.
Scannoni,Louie. A 'grizzly' rancere who loved his wine soaked biscotti. (88)
Scaroni,Arnold,Katie and Johnny, operated and managed ranch and dairy farm, 'su per la costa' some 5 miles north of Santa Cruz. Gateway to one of the best beaches on the rugged coast. (250)
Scoppettone, James J., judge of the superior court, parent of one of the members of "Harpers Bizarre" boys' band. (259)
Smerigli,rancere noted for his strength and hard work. Also noted for his violent escapades after drinking too much vino rosso.((66)
Stagnaro,Gilda, "Queen of the Santa Cruz Wharf". Operated 'Gilda's" Resturant on the Wharf, with brother Robert "Big Boy" Stagnaro and nephews,Malio and Dino.
Stagnaro, Malio J. "Stago", owner of fishing fleet, restaurant, the speed boat, and personality on Radio KSCO.
Stagnaro,Yolanda (Dunn), older sister of Gilda and "Big Boy". Mother to Geoffrey Dunn,Santa Cruz Author and Historian.
Terrini, Edward and Irene. Grandparents to Diane Bianconi. (See Bianconi, above).

Taurian,Mario (Rosso) and 'Giga',parents of Felicino (Phil)and Elso. Rancere on a ranch just north of Davenport. In 1940's moved his family to San Francisco. Good Friends of the Comelli Family. Furlans. (142)


Tambellini, Gianni.

Tambellini, Albert,brother of Angelo, Antonietta (Mungai), Bartolomeo, Giovanni, Joe and Leo.
Tambellini, Angelo, (see above)Moved to Santa Cruz in early 1970s after years as a Castroville artichoke grower.
Tambellini, Bartolomeo (see above). Raised his family in Santa Cruz: Landa Dell'Orfonello, Leda Riparetti, Nello Tambellini and Nelli Gibson Sr.
Tambellini, Giovanni, (see above). Moved to Santa Cruz in 1960s after years as an apricot grower in Palo Alto.
Tambellini, Joe (see above). Raised family in Santa Cruz: Silvio Tambellini, Victoria White and Ray Tambellini.
Tambellini, Leo and Josephine (see above) Retired to Santa Cruz in 1949 along with two daugthers, Helen Paterni and Mary Tambellini from Pittsburgh, Penn.
Tambellini, Silvio and Rosemarie, raised their family in Santa Cruz: Diane, Dennis, David and Debbie. For many years, Silvio worked a brussel sprouts ranch on the Coast near Davenport alongside Nino Paterni.
Tomada,Attilio, (Furlan)better known as "Massimo". Godfather to Giovanni Primo (John) Comelli. Deported back to Italy in the early 1940s,because he lacked the proper papers.(4)
Tori, Pietro and Gina, owners of Il Trovatore Hotel, where the banquet for newly naturalized citizens was held.

Valentino, Rudolph, Silent Movie Star in 1920's. A particular favorite of Valentina and other young girls growing up during this time periond.
Venturini Bros., Elmer,Ernie and Francis. Mother Julia. (See Comments for added details.)
Villa. Mr. and Mrs. Villa had one son about 2 years older than me.

Wilson, Jeanie, Aunt to Diane Bianconi, married to Claude Wilson.
Zoccoli, Robert, who took over operation of Red and White Grocery and ran it until Robert Jr. carried on with it.
Zolezzi, Mike

Note: Chief Gino Pini visited my mother one day, asking to see the olive oil she had been buying from a travelling salesman. Upon checking the oil in the bottom of the 5 gallon can in which she bought it, he determined that it was not pure olive oil as it had been represented to be. He asked to keep the can for analysis. On checking the salesman's car, a hidden handgun was also found. The oil salesman was not heard from any further.

Ecco fatto, Ivano. Perhaps something in the above list may trigger some recollection in the far reaches of your memory. If so, it would be great if you could write
about it, and add it to the growing lists of your great stories.


Distinti saluti,

Gino


* Indicates member of Gino's High School Class
( )Indicates number of a page in "La Nostra Costa" where name(s) or photo appears.



And this bonus from Len Klempnauer:

Hi, Ivan,
In reference to your blog posting on Nov. 5, 2006, about the death of Lou Moro, I remember well the L&F mom-and-pop grocery store at Sixth and Williams in San Jose. I lived on Fourth near Reed while attending San Jose State in the 1956-57 and 1957-58 school years and would stop by that store almost every day after class.
Eight of us from Santa Cruz rented both sides of a duplex: John Maranta, Frank Sherrill and Jim Scoppettone (Holy Cross High '54), Sam Zuckswert (Holy Cross '55), and fellow Santa Cruz High '54 grads Bob Branstetter, Don Samuelson and Butch Walters.
Occasionally I would see Marv Del Chiaro (SCHS '55) on campus, usually training with his San Jose State ROTC unit.
Then I, too, received Uncle Sam's invitation to serve the government. After my two years were up in 1960, I was put into the local Army Reserve company, the 442nd MP unit. And there was Marv, serving as one of our officers.
Today's Santa Cruzans probably cannot understand exactly how close-knit our community was then. In addition to 2nd Lt. Marv, whom I've known since Mission Hill Jr. High, the 442nd's other officers were the commanding officer, Capt. Ken Silva, who owned the Chevron Station at Pacific Avenue and Center Street across from my parents' restaurant, the Cross Roads Drive-in; 1st Lt. Jim Baker, who was the assistant ad director at the Sentinel, where I worked, and who was a long-time Cross Roads customer; 1st Lt. Jim Kosinski, one of my drinking buddies before we both went into the service in '58 and whose parents owned a motel near Murray Street; and some other lieutenant I didn't know.
Incidentally, for all those "old-timers" who remember the Cross Roads, I have a web site about it at:
http://www.webspawner.com/users/crossroadsdrivein/
I don't know whether the "farmer" Italians up the Coast ever frequented the Cross Roads, but the "fishermen" Italians certainly did, usually before going home after a night fishing on Monterey Bay. Not that I didn't know some of the "farmer" Italians quite well. Both Ralph Moceo (Holy Cross Elementary School/Bellarmine High '54) and Don Bargiacchi (SCHS '52) were roommates of mine in the early 1960s.
-- Len Klempnauer, Capitola

Sunday, November 11, 2007

LOUIE MORO: EULOGY IN ITALIANO



Ivano Franco Comelli says: In answer to some of your questions, the posting on Lou Moro: Furlan,Figlio Della Costa, American, was a eulogy to Lou, that I delivered at the Holy Cross Church in Santa Cruz. My good friend Gino Campioni was good enough to translate it into Italian. I originally posted it as a comment to the original article, however, I was so impressed with Gino's translation (my writting always reads better in his Italian) that I decided to publish it at the top of the "Blagga".
I think Lou would have been pleased. ivn0


LOUIE MORO: FURLAN, FIGLIO DELLA COSTA, AMERICANO: (Traduzione in Italiano per Gino Campioni)


Incontrai Lou Moro nel 1955. Era piu di mezzo secolo da questo tempo. Dwight D. Eisenhower ere il presidente degli stati uniti. La guerra coreana era appena finita e certi noialtri non avevamo ma sentito rammentare Vietnam. La vita era buona. Anzi tutto, un italiano, Rocky Marciano era il campione mondiale dei pesi massimi.

Avevo soltanto 18 anno, e avevo appena matricolato da Santa Cruz High School. Quel autunno entrai nel collegio San Jose State. A quel tempo vivevo con mio amico Marvin Del Chiaro, in un'appartamento sulla sesta strada sud, à pochi passi dalla scuola. Per causa della fede, un piccolo mercato era situato alle strade Sesta e Williams, una camminata corta. Piu tardi conobbi che si chiamava L & F Mercato, indicando Lou e Frank (Moro).

La, per la prima volta, incontrai la famiglia Moro. Frank, il padre di Lou Moro ed Enes, per solito si trovavano lavorando al banco. A tempi si poteva trovare anche le giovane figlie di Enes, Donna e Sandy. Dietro il negozio, dietro il banco del macellaio c'era un bel giovane, energico e con un grande sorriso.

"Quello è Lou, il mio marito", Enes mi ha informato con scintillio nei suoi occhi..Se non mi sbaglio, Lou Moro avrebbe avuto 35 anni.

Per quei anni mentre studiavo al collegio, andavo spesso à quel mercato, comprando cosette necessarie come biscotti, gelato, affettato, pane, e cetera. Ho cominciato di conoscere la famiglia Moro molto bene. Enes mi disse che era originaria di Santa Cruz, che sua madre Velia stava là sempre. Ho scoperto che Lou nacque nella regione di Friuli in Italia. Lou insieme con Frank, suo padre e Lisa, sua madre erano Furlani. Miei genitori furono nati nello stesso posto ed erano Furlani. Questa era una cosa straordinaria, perche Furlani sono rari in questa zona.

Nel 1959 mi aggiunsi con la polizia di San Jose. Nel 1960 Presidente Eisenhower, che era vicino alla fine di suo secondo tempo in ufficio mi invitò d'entrare nel esercito.
Naturalmente, un'offerta che non potevo rifuitare. (Si, fui arruollato nell esercito.) Avanti la mia partita per entrare nelle armi, la famiglia Moro è venuta in Santa Cruz e fecero conoscenza con miei genitori, Bronco e Valentina. In casa era anche mio fratello Giovanni Primo (John) così per caso Donna incontrò John per la prima volta.

Nel 1962, sempre soldato, ricebbi unaltro invito. Questa volta era per essere tistimone allo sposalizio di John e Donna. Unaltra offerta che non potei rifiutare.

Cioè Donna e John si sposarono e comiciarono loro famiglia in Santa Cruz. Poco dopo, Lou ed Enes, con Sandy insieme sono venuti è vivere in Santa Cruz per essere piu vicini à loro figliola maggiore e la nipotina Denise che arrivava presto. (La seconda nipotina Christine ariverebbe pochi anni dopo.) Così Lou Moro si piantò in Santa Cruz, vivendo la per il restante di sua vita.

Per cittadino di Santa Cruz, Lou Moro fece tante buone opere. Vorrei dire che fece tante cose grandi, però penso che egli sarebbe embarazzato se trattassi di sua vita in parole grosse. Lou Moro era un uomo buono che faceva cose buone. Suo maggiore dono per sue figlie, i generi, suoi nipotini, e per noialtri era suo esempio di come fare una buona vita facendo buone cose. Perdonami se uso vecchie clichè: Lou Moro sapeva "come parlare e come agire".

Lou Moro era una cosa di costanza nella mia vita. Era sempre pronto per guidarmi ed avvisarmi. Pare che Lou Moro non diventò mai vecchio. Nella mia mente Lou Moro è sempre giovane, energetico, con sorrisi per tutti. Naturalmente, Lou Moro invecchiò, e la settimana scorsa Donna mi informò che suo amato padre era morto.

In italano abbiamo un dittaggio vecchio, à tempi nella voce di uno moribondo. " Per lui è finita la cuccagna." Paragonando, vol dire, "Per lui il pranzo è finito." Però se veramente crediamo in Gesu Cristo, Nostro Signore, allora dobbiamo credere Sue promesse per noi. La morte non è la fine, è soltanto il comincio.

Cioè, ora vedo Lou Moro in un prato pieno di fiori di lavanda ed oro, godendo il sole, circondato da tutti suoi parenti amati ed amici che andarono avanti di lui. Che meraviglia che tutti suoi parenti sono giovani, forti, e liberi da malattia ed infermità. E per Lou Moro......esso sta la fra di loro, sembrando come apparve à me quel giorno piu di mezzo secolo fa, à quel piccolo mercato in Sixth Street, giovane e forte con suo famoso sorriso. Cara famiglia ed amici nella mia mente Lou Moro è andato ad un posto dove sara per sempre giovane. Un posto dove "la cuccagna non finisce mai piu". Un posto dove la vita è buona ed il pranzo non fnisce mai.

Addio, Louie Moro

Ivano

Monday, November 05, 2007

LOU MORO: FURLAN, AMICO DELLA COSTA, AMERICAN


I met Lou Moro in 1955. That was over a half century ago. Dwight D. Eisenhower was the President of the United States. The Korean War had just ended and some of us had never even heard of Vietnam. Life was good. After all an Italian, Rocky Marciano, was the Heavyweight Champion of the World.

I was 18 years old, and had just graduated from Santa Cruz High School; that fall I enrolled at San Jose State College. At the time, I was living with my friend Marvin Del Chiaro, at a rooming house on South Sixth Street, located a few blocks south of the College. As faith would have it, a small market was located at Sixth and Williams, a short distance away. I later was to learn that it was called the L&F Market which stood for Lou and Frank (Moro).

There, for the first time, I met the Moro Family. Frank, Lou Moro’s Father and Enes, could usually be found at the front counter. At times Enes’s young daughters, Donna and Sandy also could be found there. To the rear of the store, behind a small butcher counter, stood a young, very good looking man, full of energy with a big smile on his face.

“That’s my husband Lou”, Enes informed me with a glint in her eye.. If my calculations are correct, Lou Moro would have been 35 years old.

For the next few years as I attended the College I frequented the market, buying small food essentials such as cookies, ice cream, lunch meat, bread, etc. I got to know the Moros pretty well. Enes told me she was from Santa Cruz and that her mother Velia, still lived there. I also found out that Lou was born in the Friuli Region of Italy. Lou along with his father Frank and his mother Lisa, were Furlans. My mother and father were born in the same region and were also Furlans. This was extra-ordinary, because Furlans in this area are few an far between.

In 1959, I joined the San Jose Police Force. In 1960, President Eisenhower, who was nearing the end of his second term in office, sent me an invitation to join the United States Army. This of course, was an offer that I could not refuse…literally. (Yes, I was drafted into the Army.) Before leaving for the Army, the Moro family came to Santa Cruz and I introduced them to my parents, Bronco and Valentina. Also hanging around the house was my brother Giovanni Primo(John). So by chance, Donna met John for the first time.

In 1962, while still in the Army, I got another invitation. This time it was an invitation to be Best Man at John and Donna’s wedding. Another offer I could not refuse.

Thus, Donna and John got married and started their family in Santa Cruz. Shortly thereafter, Lou and Enes, with Sandy tagging along came to live in Santa Cruz to be closer to their eldest daughter and their soon to be born granddaughter, Denise. (Christine, their second granddaughter would be born a few years later.) So it happened that Lou Moro became and established Santa Cruzan, living the rest of his life in Santa Cruz.

As a Santa Cruzan, Lou Moro did many good things. I would like to say that he did many great things, however, I believe Lou Moro would be embarrassed if I described his life with superlatives. Lou Moro was a good man who did good things. His greatest gift to his daughters, his sons-in-law, his grandchildren,his great-grandchildren and to us, was his example on how to live a good life doing good things. Forgive me if I use and old and worn out cliché: Lou Moro knew how to "talk the talk and walk the walk.”.

Lou More was a constant in my life. He was always there to give me guidance and advice. And it seemed to me that Lou Moro never got old. In my mind Lou Moro was forever young, full of pep and energy and smiles for everyone. But of course, Lou Moro did get old and last week Donna informed me that her beloved father had passed away.

In Italian there is an old saying, sometimes uttered about a dying man. “Per lui e finita la cuccagna”. Figuratively speaking it means “For him, the party is over”. However, if we truly believe in Jesus Christ, Our Lord, then we must believe in his promise to us. Death is not the end; it is just the beginning.

Thus, now I envision, Lou Moro, standing in a field laden in flowers of lavender and gold, basking in sunlight, and surrounded by all his loving relatives and friends that have gone before him. Amazing enough, all his relatives and friends are young and strong and free from sickness and crippling infirmities. As for Lou Moro …….he stands there in there midst’s, appearing as he appeared to me that day more than a half century ago, at that small market on Sixth Street, young and strong with his famous smile on his face. Dear family and friends, in my mind, Lou Moro has gone to a place were he will be forever young. A place where “la cuccagna no finisce mai piu”. A place where life is good and the party never ends.

Adio, Louie Moro

Ivano

Tuesday, October 23, 2007

GUGLIELMO WINERY: LA NOSTRA COSTA CON VINO ROSSO







IVANO FRANCO COMELLI SAYS:






THE ‘OLD RANCERE’ HAS BEEN INVITED TO APPEAR (RAIN OR SHINE) AT THE GUGLIELMO WINERY IN MORGAN HILL ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2007, FROM 10:00 AM TO 3 PM.




HE WILL BE SELLING AND SIGNING COPIES OF “LA NOSTRA COSTA” (AS LONG AS HIS SUPPLY LASTS). REMEMBER CHRISTMAS IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER. A BOTTLE (OR TWO) OF GUGLIELMO WINE AND A COPY OF “LA NOSTRA COSTA’’ WOULD MAKE A WONDERFUL GIFT FOR SOMEONE SPECIAL ON YOUR LIST.

OR YOU CAN JUST VISIT WITH THE ‘OLD RANCERE’ WHILE PERUSING THE BEAUTIFUL GUGLIELMO WINERY AND ENJOYING THE SPECIAL ACTIVITIES AT THEIR ANNUAL “BOTTLE YOUR OWN RED WINE EVENT.” A DESCRIPTION OF THE EVENT AS DESCRIBED IN THEIR BROCHURE FOLLOWS BELOW. SALUTI A TUTTI



SATURDAY-NOVEMBER 3RD – CORK EQUITY #18

BOTTLE YOUR OWN RED WINE 10 AM – 3 PM


CORK EQUITY; A method of saving big money and having fun by getting hands on involvement in the bottling and labeling of your own red wine. Like sweat equity –but with no sweat! Live Italian accordion music and complimentary grilled sausages prepared by our talented BBQ crew make for a day you won’t soon forget! Don’t miss the last Cork Equity of 2007! The Guglielmo family again invites you to turn back the pages of time and relive the rich tradition of our past for this special bottle your own wine event circa 2007 complete with the strolling Italian accordion of Tom Torriglia!

The Cork Equity wines are priced at $5 per 750ml bottle, plus 50 cents for the empty bottle if you do not have your own. Although the wine is different for each event, we feel they show depth and finesse not usually associated with wines of this price. Call the winery or check our website towards the middle of October for a breakdown of the red blend we will be offering on November 3rd. A fun time is guaranteed for all!

GUGLIELMO WINERY
1480 East Main Avenue Website: www.guglielmowinery.com
Morgan Hill, CA 95037
408-779-2145





DIRECTIONS: FROM SAN JOSE TAKE HWY 101 TO E.DUNNE AVE OFF RAMP. TURN LEFT ON E.DUNNE AVE. PROCEED ACROSS HWY 101 OVER-PASS TO CONDIT RD.(2ND STOP LIGHT). TURN LEFT ON CONDIT RD AN PROCEED NORTH 0.8MI TO E.MAIN AVE.(NEXT STOP LIGHT). TURN RIGHT ON E.MAIN AVE. AND PROCEED APPROXIMATELY 1/2MI TO WINERY ON YOUR RIGHT. (LIVE OAK HIGH SCHOOL IS ACROSS THE STREET.)



FROM: SANTA CRUZ-WATSONVILLE-SALINAS-GILROY, GET ON HWY 101 AND PROCEED NORTH TO E.DUNNE AVE. OFF RAMP. TURN RIGHT ON E. DUNNE AVE TO CONDIT RD (FIRST STOP LIGHT). TURN LEFT ON CONDIT RD. AND PROCEED NORTH 0.8MI TO E.MAIN AVE.(NEXT STOP LIGHT.) TURN RIGHT ON E.MAIN AVE. AND PROCEED ABOUT 1/2 MILE TO THE WINERY ON YOUR RIGHT.



BUONA FORTUNA E SEMPRE AVANTI




DON'T FORGET TO VISIT THE LA NOSTRA COSTA WEBSITE:


www.lanostracosta.com-a.googlepages.com

Wednesday, October 17, 2007

THE EPIC OF THE FRIULANS OF CALIFORNIA


WELCOME VISITORS FROM FURLAN DIASPORE BLOGSPOT:
http://www.furlans.blogspot.com/


IF YOU WANT TO SEE 'LA NOSTRA COSTA' PUBLICIZED IN THE 'FRIULI NEL MONDO' NEWSPAPER, "CLICCA" ON THE ARTICLE ABOVE TO ENLARGE THE IMAGE. IT IS IN ITALIAN HOWEVER YOU MAY RECOGNIZE SOME OF THE PEOPLE IN THE PHOTOGRAPHS. 'FRIULI NEL MONDO' IS PUBLISHED IN UDINE, ITALY AND IS CIRCULATED THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. WEBSITE: http://www.friulinelmondo.com/

Sunday, October 14, 2007

LaNORMA: O DIO CHE TRENO LUNGO

--------'Clicca' on Photo for Enlarged Image-----


The Lorenzi Ranch "su per la costa" showing bridge over train tracks. For further information regarding the photo 'clicca' on comments at the end of this aritcle. (Photo Courtesy LaNorma and Al Wilson)
*********************************************************************
IVANO FRANCO COMELLI SAYS: LaNorma (Norma Dinelli-Wilson) has once again dug deep into her "bag of memories" and has come up with this jewel.


IL TRENO LUNGO


There are so many stories and so many memories where do we begin and we could go on and on.
Does everyone remember the train going up along the Coast Road to the Cement Plant
Everyday?! Does anyone remember the bridge over the railroad track going over to the Lorenzi Ranch? (Think Steve Della Mora farms there now and the bridge is gone and the Road to the Ranch yard is entirely different.
While my Dad (Dante Dinelli) farmed and was a partner in the Grossi Ranch – one ranch North and almost across from Laguna we have recollection of the train so vividly.

We kids---Lea and her sister Ida (Grossi) would wave to the train. In those days it had a caboose; the men in the caboose would smile and wave to us. At the Lorenzi Ranch we went from one side of the bridge to wave to the engineers and then ran to the other side to wave to the caboose.

Sure miss those cabooses.

In the later 40’s – after the war – my Dad’s friends from Santa Barbara sent us a big crate of Avocados. They were not ripe of course so that we could enjoy them as they ripened. Well, no one knew what they were and thought those hard things were no good and they threw the whole crate down by the railroad track – many ranceri did that sort of thing in the “old days”.


When the train came by going up to the cement plant the engineer must have spotted it. Then, as the train was coming back down towards Santa Cruz, it stopped.
Some one got off the train and climbed up the bank to the crate of avocados. "Wow" ,he probably thought – " what a treasure! "


This happened again when my Mom’s cousin from Stockton sent a crate of asparagus. The Cook at the cookhouse cooked a few; but as no
One knew what they were he cut off the tops and cooked the bottoms – not good – so the whole crate of Asparagus went over the bank by the railroad track. Next day the train did the same thing on its way back towards Santa Cruz --this time loading up with a treasure of asparagus.

Now, of course, we all know what these yummy vegetables are – however, at the time , there probably were a lot of people who would look at our beloved artichokes and say “what are these and how do you eat them?”

This is one of my many memories of growing up on La Nostra Costa and on the ranches. Memories of all our dear relatives. ************


LaNorma was born and raised on "La Nostra Costa" (Our Coast). Thanks Norma.

L Nostra Costa Website: http://www.lanostracosta.com-a.googlepages.com/

Friday, October 05, 2007

FIGLI DELLA COSTA - SUPREME SACRIFICE

NORMANDY MEMORIAL CEMETERY
(Photo courtesy of Norma and Al Wilson)




-- LIEUTENANT ATTILIO JOSEPH DOGLIOTTI c.1943 (Photo courtesy of Gino Campioni) --







PVT. AMEDEO LUCCHESI AND HIS BRIDE MARY (MODOLO) c. 1942. (Photo courtesy of the Modolo Family)


***********************************************************************************




THE WORLD WAR II TV MINISTRY ON PBS SHOULD REMIND US ALL THAT CERTAIN 'FIGLI DELLA COSTA' HAVE MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE FOR OUR COUNTRY.
I HAVE THEREFORE RE-PUBLISHED TWO ARTICLES FROM THE 'LA NOSTRA COSTA' BLOG.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PVT, AMEDEO LUCCHESI - INFORMATION REQUESTED ON WWII VETERAN KILLED IN ACTION



Alverda Orlando forwards a request from Robert and Joan Nelson, seeking information on 'Figlio Della Costa' Amedeo Lucchesi who was killed inWWII.




Hi Ivan.


Do you know where this soldier was buried. I was not aware of this man living in Davenport. I have an incomplete list of coastside men killed in WW 2 and he is not among them.Thanks for any information you can give me and I will pass it on to the inquirer.Alverda


From: Robert and Joan Nelson
Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2007 3:22 PMSubject: Amadeo Lucchesi


Good Afternoon Alverda, Below you will find the main source of information which I have on Amedeo Lucchesi, the soldier from Davenport who was killed at Normandy.If you are able to locate any additional information on Lucchesi, his burial location and hopefully a photograph (ideally in uniform) that would be of great assistance. This information is being accumulated for a project I am working on in conjunction with the Central Library. Thanks in advance for any information which you migh provide.nels *

---------


(Santa Cruz, Sentinel August 10, 1944 1:3)
Amadeo Lucchesi Killed in Action on Normandy Front Pvt. Amadeo Lucchesi, a member of the 314th infantry, was killed in action in France June 20, his widow, Mrs. Mary Lucchesi of Davenport, learned in a telegram from the war department this week.


Pvt. Lucchesi entered the army June 15, 1943. He got his training at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, and Camp Phillips, Kansas, and was first assigned to the 42nd or Rainbow division. He later was transferred to the 314th infantry, Mrs. Lucchesi told the Sentinel-News today.He lived in Sunnyvale before going into the service. His parents still reside there. Mrs. Lucchesi is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Modolo of Davenport.


*According to information from the Modolo Family, Pvt. Lucchesi was buried at the Normandy Cemetery (Top photo) and his body still remains there today in the company of his fallen comrades. ivn0
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Monday, December 04, 2006

FIGLIO DELLA COSTA - LIEUTENANT ATTILIO JOSEPH DOGLIOTTI REMEMBERED

THIS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, IS THE 65TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BOMBING OF PEARL HARBOR. Immediately after the bombing, America declared war on the Empire of Japan. As a consequence Adolph Hitler declared war on the United States and Italy’s Benito Mussolini followed suit. As a result of Italy’s involvement in World War II on the side of Japan and Germany, many Italians without proper citizenship papers ‘su per la costa’ and elsewhere in America were declared to be ‘enemy aliens’ . As described by Norma (Dinelli) Wilson in her story (Part I,) and also in Chapter 3 of my book, "La Costa E La Guerra", severe restrictions were imposed on the Italians, causing some to be relocated and some to lose their jobs. In October of 1942, the Attorney General of the United States lifted the restrictions on the Italians, although the United States was still at war with Italy. One of the main reason this was done, was because so many sons of Italian aliens were in uniform and fighting for the United States in Europe and the Pacific . Attilio Joseph Dogliotti of Santa Cruz was one of those boys and he made the supreme sacrifice for his (our) Country.The following article was sent to me by Gino Campioni and was copied from the original appearing in the “Santa Cruz Riptide-Vol. 10- No. 20.
"In a window of a cozy home at 498 Bay street there proudly hangs a service flag with one star for all that family could give to its Flag.But today that star has turned to gold for that home has made the supreme sacrifice--it has given all it had for its Flag, and its walls never again will resound to a cheery "Hi, Mom,"from a happy, six-foot youth as he came bounding home from work.Saturday afternoon, May 8, Second Lieutenant Attilio Joseph Dogliotti, 22, was at the controls of a four-motored Liberator bomber when it crashed in the northern part of Arizona. Lieutenant Dogliotti was killed. Three others in the plane were also killed.The body of the young pilot was to be shipped to White's Mortuary some time this week where a military funeral will be held.Son of Mr. and Mrs. B. Dogliotti of 498 Bay street, Joseph was born in Santa Cruz and was the only child. He graduated from Santa Cruz high school in 1939. In 1938 he was captain of the heavy weight champion football team and was an outstanding tackle. In 1939 Joseph was captain of the champion baseball team. He was an honor student in agriculture in high school, and one of the most popular students in the school.After his graduation, Joseph was employed at the Coast Drum and Box company on Mission street and later he was employed with the Santa Cruz Portland Cement company in Davenport.It was in April of 1942 that Joseph enlisted as an aviation cadet and was sent to Santa Ana Air Base for pre-flight training. He progressed successfully through the various phases of training and finally, on January 4 of 1943, Joseph was awarded his wings and commission at Stockton. He was a bomber pilot.Lieutenant Dogliotti was en route to Pocatello, Idaho, from Gibbs Field, Texas, to get a new plane when the crash occurred. His was the second plane of the same type to have crashed in approximately the same area.Slated for promotion to first lieutenant within a few weeks and then a captaincy following quickly, Lieutenant Dogliotti had written his proud parents that he would be home for a furlough the first of June.But Joseph came home earlier on an eternal furlough granted by his Supreme Commander-in Chief. And the little star in that service flag has turned to gold. "






THROUGH THE LORD'S MERCY, I AM CERTAIN THAT THE TWO FALLEN HEROS ARE TOGETHER AGAIN 'ACROSS IL ULTIMO PONTE'. IVNO