Monday, December 15, 2008

THE PORTER MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY - SOQUEL, CA

"Our Gang" - Bonny Doon (c. 1938) - Left to Right: Gianni Comelli, Guiliano Dughi, Reno Cantarutti, Felicino Taurian and Freddie Moro. In front (as always) "Il Diavolino" (Ivano).


IVANO SAYS: "THE OLD RANCERE" WILL BE MAKING A PRESENTATION AT THE PORTER MEMORIAL LIBRARY ON JANUARY 14, 2009 AT 10:30 AM.

Below is a bit of history relating to the Library which is posted on its website:


Brief History of the Porter Memorial Public Library
The story of the Porter Memorial Library begins in the year 1912. A group of Soquel women, calling themselves the Soquel Ladies Improvement Club, decided that the town needed a public library. They approached William and Mary Porter Sesnon, long time residents of the area, to donate a piece of land in Soquel for the library. An agreement was reached that the ladies would raise the money for the building and the Sesnons would donate the land and their own architects (Ward and Bome of San Francisco, who had designed the Sesnon house now on the campus of Cabrillo College) to design the building.
The money was raised, the land was donated and the building began. On October 19, 1912, the cornerstone was laid, and in January 1913, the doors of the Soquel Memorial Public Library opened to the public. The building was named the Porter Memorial Public Library in honor of Benjamin and Kate Porter, the parents of Mary Porter Sesnon.
The building was truly a community effort. Even children helped. All of the stones for the large stone fireplace were carried from Soquel Creek by the Soquel Elementary School children.
The flagpole that stands in front of the ibrary bears a plaque dedicated to Nora Angell, the secretary of the Ladies Improvement Club who was the driving force behind the movement to build the Library.
The Library has remained open since its beginning in 1913, except for brief periods following the floods of 1955 and 1982 and the earthquake of 1989. But something very important happened in 1978. With the passage of Proposition 13, the County decided it could no longer afford to offer library services in Soquel. Mona Blackholm, a Soquel resident, approached County officials with the 1912 agreement between the Sesnons and Santa Cruz County. It stated that that the land and building were being given to the County only to be operated as a Public Library. Armed with this agreement and backed by a group of volunteers, Mona convinced the County to turn the operation of the Library over to the volunteers, now known as the Porter Memorial Library Board. Many people offered their time to serve as librarians or help in other ways with Library operation. The result is that the Library is open and flourishing today due to the same kind of community spirit that built it in 1912.
In 1992, the Santa Cruz County Historical Trust awarded the building landmark status and the blue oval plaque stating this is proudly displayed next to the entrance.
In 1996, Norman Angell, Nora’s son, willed monies from his estate to the Porter Memorial Library and to the Soquel Historical Society with the hope that together these two groups could develop a Soquel Museum. With this money, the Library has been refurbished to allow a room for a display of Soquel’s history. We have Mr. Angell to thank for the new, fresh look and for the beautiful furnishings we have in the Library today.
When looking back at its history, people have often called this building “The Little Library That Could.” It is because of the many people who wished to see a library built and to continue offering library services to the many people of Soquel, that the Porter Memorial Library is here and serving us today.

---------


The Library is located at 3050 Porter Street in downtown Soquel (across the street from the U.S. Post Office). The telephone number for the Library is 831-475-3326.


MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR A TUTTI!






Tuesday, December 09, 2008

FIGLIA DELLA COSTA - NORA (FISTOLERA) DELLA SANTINA

THE BELOW REMEMBRANCE APPEARED IN THE SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL,
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/ :



Services will be held on Tuesday for Nora Della Santina who passed away in Santa Cruz on December 4, 2008. Born in Santa Cruz, she would have celebrated her 101st birthday on December 23rd.
Born to Paul and Barbara Fistolera, her father was a dairyman on the north coast, and as a youngster, Nora was raised on the Yellow Bank Dairy and Swanton and later in Knights Landing near Sacramento. Following her marriage, many of her years were spent residing in Laguna and New Town.
She will be remembered as a loving mother, grandmother, and great grandmother, who enjoyed the times shared with her family and her blessings of long life.
She is survived by her sons, Rico and Paul Della Santina of Santa Cruz, and was preceded in death by her husband, Domenico Della Santina, and her son, Louie Della Santina and her first grandchild, Rick. Nora also leaves her beloved grandchildren, Elaine, Fred, Mark, Gina, Brenda, Natalie, Nicole and great grandchildren, Katie, Garrett, Jennifer, and Clark.
One of six sisters, she was preceded in death by four siblings and is survived by her sister, Lena Shaw of Santa Cruz.
Services will be held on Tuesday, December 9, at Benito and Azzaro Pacific Gardens Chapel in Santa Cruz, beginning at 1 o'clock p.m.
A private committal will be held at the Holy Cross Mausoleum in Santa Cruz. In lieu of flowers contributions to your favorite charity are preferred.
-----------------
IVANO SAYS:

Nora Della Santina was a close and dear friend of my mother, Valentina.

On page 252 in “La Nostra Costa” (Our Coast), I included the following endnote which referred to one of Nora’s sisters, Zelda (Fistolera) Ceragioli:

“Lea (Grossi) Lambert, the daughter of Settimo and Inez (Fistolera) Grossi, has reminded me that there were six Fistolera sisters: Inez, Winnie (Giraudo), Nora (Della Santina), Zelda, Vivian (Rodoni) and Lena (Shaw). Her grandparents, Paul and Barbara Fistolera had a rancio in Swanton. Later Lea lived on a ranch with her father and mother, just north of Laguna.”

I also refer to Nora on page 111 in reference to the purchase of the Davenport Bakery (later the Miramar and now the Whale Street Bakery):

“…………….. the Caiocca’s sold their interest in the business to Dominico Della Santina and his wife Nora (Fistolera). Dominico, who was better known by the coastal Italians as “Lambari”, and Nora had two sons, Louis and Rico”.

Actually I was in error when I wrote that the Della Santina’s had only two sons. In fact they had three sons. Paul Della Santina was a late arrival “su per la costa”. Dominico and Nora later sold the Bakery to Mac and Evelyn Morelli of Davenport.

Addio Nora. Until we meet again across Il Ultimo Ponte .

Thursday, December 04, 2008

PRESENTATION IN SOQUEL, CA - JAN 14, 2009



(CLICCA ON PHOTOS FOR ENLARGED IMAGE)


IVANO SAYS: THE 'OLD RANCERE' HAS BEEN INVITED TO MAKE A PRESENTATION AT THE PORTER MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY IN SOQUEL ON

WEDNSDAY, JAN. 14, 2009,
AT 10:30AM. I WILL BE PUBLISHING MORE DETAILS AS WE NEAR THE DATE OF THE EVENT.




IN THE MEANTIME I AM POSTING AN E-MAIL I RECEIVED FROM PROF. DERRILL KERRICK. IN IT HE REMINDS ME THAT SOQUEL HAD A NUMBER OF ITALIAN IMMIGRANTS AROUND THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY. HIS GRANDMOTHER MARIA (MARY) BERGAZZI KERRICK WAS ONE OF THEM. THE HISTORY OF THE ITALIANS IN GLEN HAVEN (NOW SOQUEL) IS RECORDED IN THE BOOK: "OH, THAT REMINDS ME" BY PHYLLIS BERTORELLI PATTEN AND EDITED BY ELIZABETH SPEDDING CALCIANO.







Ivano: As I promised (long ago) I finally got around to photocopying (for you) the book "Oh That Reminds Me" by Phyllis Bertorelli Patten. It was published in 1969. It is all about the early (ca. 1900) Italian immigrants in the Glen Haven area near Soquel. Although it is not eloquently written it is a nice addition to the overall history of Italian immigrants in the Santa Cruz area. This is where my grandma Mary's parents settled (ca. > 1885)...Mary was born in 1890...she had four brothers. There are photos of young Mary in the book and stories and pictures of her parents and brothers. The photocopy is not the greatest (it is a copy of a copy) but it is readable. After you read it, I think it would be a nice addition to the blagga. I know of one of Phyllis' relatives (somewhat younger than me) who might contribute to the blagga.
Attached are a couple of pictures I scanned from the book "Oh That Reminds Me". In the lumberjack photo my great-great grandfather is #5. In the other my grandma Mary is labeled "Mary".Sempre Avanti,
derrill

Check Spelling

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

FIGLIO DELLA COSTA - JOSEPH PETER DELLAMORA

THE BELOW REMEMBRANCE WAS PUBLISHED IN THE SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL:
www.santacruzsentinel.com

Joseph Peter Dellamora Jr.

Services will be Saturday for Joseph Peter Dellamora, Jr. who passed away after a lengthy illness November 26, 2008 at home in Santa Cruz. He was 84 years old.
He was born June 2, 1924 in Santa Cruz the son of Giuseppe Curly and Almenia Minnie Dellamora. His early childhood was spent in Bonny Doon and at the age of 6 his family moved into Santa Cruz. He attended Bay View Elementary, Mission Hill Junior High and graduated from Santa Cruz High in 1942. Following High School, Joe served in the U.S. Merchant Marines until 1945.
Joe spent his life working in agriculture. Prior to World War Two he farmed with his father at the Pebble Beach Ranch in Pescadero growing Brussels sprouts and artichokes. From 1945 until 1948 he and his father farmed Brussels sprouts at Ano Nuevo Ranch. In the early 1950's Joe lived and farmed row crops in Uvalde, Texas before returning to the North Coast where he continued to grow Brussels sprouts and artichokes from Pescadero to Wilder Ranch, until his retirement in 1992. He served as president and was a member of the board of directors of the Santa Cruz Growers Association. He also served as president of the Marketing Order for Brussels sprout in the state of California.
He was an accomplished accordion player and played at the World Fair on Treasure Island in San Francisco and at the water carnivals held at the Plunge at the Boardwalk. He also and enjoyed playing at friends weddings. His mother's family, the Mori's were established in the San Francisco Bay area, where Italian immigrants would visit and stay. Mori's point was named after them.
Joe had an amazing knowledge for Santa Cruz history. He knew about the people, backgrounds and various family connections. He had an incredible memory for indigenous animals and rescued countless stray or abandoned critters. He was a quiet man, but when asked a question, would gladly share his expertise or give an opinion.
He was an avid reader and enjoyed playing cards especially Pedro. He loved barbecues on the coast with close friends and family. He loved polenta meals with pheasant or quail he had hunted.
Joe was an avid outdoors man and loved to hunt and fish. He hunted in Canada, Utah, the Sierra's and on the Apache Mescalero Reservation in New Mexico. He fished on San Francisco Bay and took an annual fishing trip to the Mattole River in Northern California and spent many seasons fishing the San Lorenzo River.
He is survived by, Tiki Dellamora of Santa Cruz; son, Steve Dellamora of Scotts Valley; daughter, Jill Dellamora Grossi and her husband Billy of Santa Cruz; six grandchildren, Bianca, Bridget and Sofia Grossi of Santa Cruz; Tara Rigby of Shelton, WA and Ali Richardson of Chowchilla, CA and Joey Dellamora of Scotts Valley; two nephews, Joe Pappas of Santa Cruz and Pete Pappas of Florida; He is also survived by three great grandchildren and his brother and sister in law, Joe and Peggy Nulph and their family. Joe was preceded in death by his son, Charlie Heastings Dellamora, his sister, Maggie Pappas; his parents, Minnie and Curly Dellamora and his best friend, Jerry Kato.
Services will be Saturday, December 6, 2008 at 10:00 am at Benito & Azzaro Pacific Gardens Chapel 1050 Cayuga St., Santa Cruz, CA. Friends are invited to call at Pacific Gardens Chapel on Friday from 1:00 pm until 5:00 pm. A private cremation will follow.
Joe's family would like to express their profound thanks to Dr. William Cao, Dr. Andrew Calciano and the nursing staff from Heartland Hospice, especially, Elizabeth, Ronnie and Vanessa. In lieu of flowers contributions are preferred to Heartland Hospice, 2511 Garden Rd, B200, Monterey, CA 93940 or to Native Animal Rescue and Rehabilitation Wildlife Center, P.O. Box 1001, Santa Cruz, CA 95061.

ADDIO, JOE. UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN, ACROSS IL ULTIMO PONTE .

Thursday, November 27, 2008

EPI TENCHISQHIVI * (HAPPY THANKSGIVING) -2008

A FAMILY FEAST AT THE RODONI'S IN SANTA CRUZ (c.1955-60)

IVANO SAYS: The above photo was sent to me by Donna Rodoni. I can identify the following people in the photo: On the left side starting from nearest to camera: Elio Rodoni, Julio Rinaldi,
Roberto Degli Esposti, Fabby Degli Esposti, Mario Rodoni and Jeannie Rodoni. At the far end on the right side: Vanda Degli Esposti. I need some help with the rest on the right side.

Thanks to my "blaggatori" (see comments) the right side of the table has been ID as: Vanda, then Sallie Rinaldi Barilati, Barbara Barilati, Rico Barilati, Sandra Rogers and Alma Rinaldi Rogers.

________________

* As written in Gino Campioni's Itanglish Dictionary

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

PASTURES OF PLENTY





IVANO SAYS: I was searching the web and I came up with the below article regarding "Pastures of Plenty". This program was done for NPR (Public Broadcast Radio). by Rachel Goodman. Thought I'd remind fellow "Blaggatori" that transcripts and audio of this excellent program are still available on the internet.



PROGRAM 2: 1920-1940’s
Hard Times in the Country: Europeans, Okies and Fruit Tramps

This program looks at the European immigrants who came to work the fields of California. We’ll tour the farms of Ivano Comelli, son of an Italian farm worker, and Nita Gizdich, Croatian-American apple farmer. The decade of the 1930’s was marked by bloody labor battles across the state, in places like Pixley and Salinas, as workers began to demand their rights. As times got harder, thousands of families took to the roads, picking crops up and down the Central Valley. The Okies joined the migrant stream in 1935, swelling the ranks of unemployed pickers. We also hear about El Repatriacion, where law enforcement and immigration officials deported nearly 400,000 Mexican and American citizens of Mexican descent. We think we know this chapter of our history, but we haven’t heard this part.

Travers and Sakata Fruit Company employees, Watsonville, CA, September 1932. Photo: PajaroValley Historical Association.

Europeans
"They said in California, that work it grew on trees, And everyone was going there, just like a swarm of bees." Poem, Arkansas migrant, 1935.


Nita Gizdich, Owner, Gizdich Ranch (apples and ollalieberries), Watsonville, CA
"My father came from Croatia, and my mother came from Sacramento. They started a farm right here, and I was born around the corner, and I’ve been here all my life." Listen Read Transcript
LaNORMA, RACHEL GOODMAN, 'THE OLD RANCERE' ON THE RODONI RANCH "SU PER LA COSTA".
Ivano Comelli, Son of Italian Ranceri, Davenport, CA
"My father, who was an immigrant from Italy, worked these ranches from 1923 to when he died in 1993. It was a hard life but it was a good life."Listen Read Transcript


Okies and Fruit Tramps


Ed Maples, Retired Union Leader, Fruit Tramp, Salinas, CA
"We were getting seventeen cents an hour picking apricots."Listen Read Transcript


Gerri Martin, Teacher, former packing shed worker, Watsonville, CA
"Dorothea Lange pictured all these families as having great despair.I remember nothing but happiness and laughter."Listen Read Transcript
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Thursday, October 23, 2008

GUGLIELMO'S CORK EQUITY DAY NUMERO XXII -SAT. NOV 1


11/2/08
Well, fellow Blaggatori, the event start slowly. Lorenzo Spivacchi (Larry Spivak) Wine Tasting Manager said that he never had seen it so slow. Then about Noon the people came. Then the rains came. So the people stayed to wait until the rains slacken. More people came and then more rain. Before we knew it we had quite a crowd who didn't want to leave. So we cranked up the music and had a real party. A most succesful event. Thanks for showing everybody. Ivano



******* ***************** EPI ALLUINI (HAPPY HALLOWEEN)





SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2008



BOTTLE YOUR OWN RED WINE: GUGLIELMO’S CORK EQUITY DAY #22,SATURDAY, NOVEMEBER 1, 2008 – 10 AM – 3 PM. ‘RAIN OR SHINE.’CORK EQUITY n: Definition: A method of saving big money by getting hands on involvement assisting in the bottling, corking and labeling of your own premium wine. Nearly six thousand wine lovers have turned up at our cellar door on Cork Equity Day looking for a great bottle of wine at a great price. Few have been disappointed! Don’t miss your chance to meet some friends, have some fun, hear some great Italian music, enjoy our complimentary bread and cheese, plus earn access to our Chef's Table featuring or famous grilled sausages with purchase of a case or more.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




IVANO SAYS: AS USUAL THE ‘OLD RANCERE’ WILL ONCE AGAIN BE PRESENT TO SELL AND SIGN COPIES OF “LA NOSTRA COSTA” (OUR COAST). HE ALSO WILL BRING ALONG HIS ITALIAN 'BOOMA-BOXA', AND WILL PLAY, (AND POSSIBLY SING-ALONG WITH) SOME OLD ITALIAN SONGS AS WELL AS SOME OLD FAVORITES NOT-SO-ITALIAN. COME JOIN ME AT MY TABLE. YOU CAN'T MISS ME. IVNO





TO GET TO THE WINERY FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS BELOW:









GUGLIELMO'S 1480 EAST MAIN AVENUEMORGAN HILL, CA 95037(408) 779-3166 http://www.guglielmowinery.com/DIRECTIONS: FROM SAN JOSE TAKE HWY 101 TO E.DUNNE AVE OFF RAMP. TURN LEFT ON E.DUNNE AVE. PROCEED ACROSS HWY 101 OVER-PASS TO CONDIT RD.(2ND STOP LIGHT). TURN LEFT ON CONDIT RD AN PROCEED NORTH 0.8MI TO E.MAIN AVE.(NEXT STOP LIGHT). TURN RIGHT ON E.MAIN AVE. AND PROCEED APPROXIMATELY 1/2MI TO WINERY ON YOUR RIGHT. (LIVE OAK HIGH SCHOOL IS ACROSS THE STREET.)------


FROM: SANTA CRUZ-WATSONVILLE-SALINAS-GILROY, GET ON HWY 101 AND PROCEED NORTH TO E.DUNNE AVE. OFF RAMP. TURN RIGHT ON E. DUNNE AVE TO CONDIT RD (FIRST STOP LIGHT). TURN LEFT ON CONDIT RD. AND PROCEED NORTH 0.8MI TO E.MAIN AVE.(NEXT STOP LIGHT.) TURN RIGHT ON E.MAIN AVE. AND PROCEED ABOUT 1/2 MILE TO THE WINERY ON YOUR RIGHT.
BUONA FORTUNA E SEMPRE AVANTI. IVANO

Monday, October 13, 2008

SANTA CRUZ MUSEUM OF ARTS AND HISTORY PRESENTATION A BIG SUCCESS


I WANT TO THANK ALL OF YOU WHO ATTENDED Ivano's presentation at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History last Saturday morning. Ivano told me that you were a great audience and kept him going for over an hour and half. Wow!! That's great.
Unfortunately, I could not be there. I had heard that King Hussein II of Jordan was touring Alaska on his Harley. I wanted to "catch" him before he left. I still haven't caught up with him, however; my trusty Harley, "Laskan Scaduie" (photo above) is pretty darn fast. I read on Ivano's 'blagga' that His Majesty liked to stop at small out of the way places for 'rest stops' (like the Whale Street Bakery in Davenport). I am going to speed up to 'Nomie" to see if I can catch up with him there. Wish me luck and thanks again for coming to see Ivano and 'The Old Rancere' recreate Historical "Nostra Costa" events. Maybe I will see you next time, if I'm not too busy (wink-wink) with other "Foreign Events".
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IVANO SAYS: I also want to thank everyone who attended. I also want to thank Researchers Anonymous and the staff of the The Santa Cruz Museum for having me at their Beautiful Museum.
BTW: The Museum is now carrying my book. Stop in and buy a copy (or two) of "La Nostra Costa (Our Coast). The book makes for a great Holiday Gift and it is a great way to support the fine works of the SC Museum. Thanks again e Sempre Avanti.
Ivano Franco Comelli is the author of "La Nostra Costa" (Our Coast), A Family's Journey To And From the North Coast of Santa Cruz, California (1923-1983). Please visit Ivano's website at : http://www.lanostracosta.com-a.googlepages.com/

Saturday, October 04, 2008

BUON GIORNO -- FELLOW SIX-PACKERS




NOW THAT I HAVE YOUR ATTENTION-----don’t forget Ivano’s Researchers Anonymous presentation at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, next Saturday, October 11, from 10:00 AM to 12:00 N. The Museum is located at 705 Front Street in downtown Santa Cruz, telephone number 831-429-1964

This time around, Ivano in his guise as the ‘Old Rancere’ will recount how it was growing up ‘su per la costa’ in a cloud of dust and the smell of PATTUME.. Hope to see you all there (wink- wink) fellow Six-Packers.


Ivano holding a model of the infamous
'Rubber Gun', used in gunfights on the
Rodoni Ranch "su per la costa".

Friday, September 19, 2008

THE KING OF JORDAN VISITS THE WHALE CITY BAKERY - DAVENPORT, CA

---- THE ORIGINAL DAVENPORT BAKERY------
Mary and Gilbert Caiocca standing on the corner of Coast Hwy 1 and Ocean Ave, where the Whale City Bakery is now located, c.1945. Photo courtesy of Dave Scott, William Caiocca's stepson.*






Patty Morelli (left) and LaNorma in front of the Whale City Bakery.
(Photo courtesy of La Norma.)





Patty (left) and Whale City Bakery Official King Greeter (OKG) Amy . ['Clicca' on photos to view enlarged image.] Photo courtesy of LaNorma.




___________________________________________________________




THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE WAS DERIVED FROM INFORMATION PROVIDED ME BY LaNORMA:


Towards the end of summer and early fall last year (2007) – the King of Jordan (Abdulla II) and his wife (Queen Rania) were visiting San Francisco. Since the King’s next stop was to be in Monterey, he decided to ride down the Coast on a Harley Motorcycle. Off he went with his entourage of bodyguards, etc. (some riding in passenger cars, others on motorcycles of their own) down Coast Hwy 1, passed ‘Haffa Moom Bay’ passed Pescadero, passed "La Slida" and onto Davenport. At which point, as many of us who have taken a similar trip down “la costa” have experienced, His Majesty (on the left in photo) needed a break from the long ride.

As providence would have it, the King commanded his entourage to stop at the Whale City Bakery for a much needed restroom and refreshment stop. The owner Emad Ayad was not there, however; his Official King Greeter (OKG) Amy was. The bodyguards, wanting to make sure that security was in place for this most necessary stop, came in first. They made contact with OKG Amy and told her that the King of Jordan was about to enter her historic establishment and most seriously wanted to use the restroom. OKG Amy then led the bodyguards to the sole bathroom in the Bakery. After a thorough inspection of the rest room and establishment, the King was given the “go ahead” to enter the Bakery.

Apparently, OKG Amy made such an impression with the bodyguards, that they established a friendly rapport with her. This was especially true when she informed them that Mrs. Ayad (wife of the owner) was originally from Jordan.

As a gesture of good will and unbeknown to the His Majesty, OKG Amy gave the bodyguards a big apple pie for the group to injoy when in Monterey. The bodyguards thanked OKG Amy and along with the King continued on their way to the City of Monterey.

When the King and his entourage subsequently arrived at their hotel, the bodyguards in the presence of their King brought out the apple pie. Being surprised by having such a delicious pie in his presence, the King asked the body guards where they had obtained such a delicious morsel . (As we all know, what Kings want to know, Kings will always get to know.) The bodyguards promptly informed His Majesty that OKG Amy at Whalers (Whale City Bakery) had given it to them as a gift.

Whereupon, the King reminded his bodyguards that it is the custom of their culture to always acknowledge a gift and thus they were obligated to reciprocate with a gift of their own. He commanded the bodyguards to immediately to go back with a gift. Promptly obeying the King’s command, two of the bodyguards drove all the way back to Davenport with a gift from the King of Jordan.

Much to the surprise of OKG Amy, the King’s gift was a very expensive watch, with the official insignia of Jordan. (LaNorma actually saw it and describes the watch as: “Gorgeous and awsome".)


And now for the moral to this story which is: "If you happen to own a restaurant in Davenport (or anywhere 'su per la costa' for that matter) make sure that you hire and Official King Greeter. When nature comes a-calling, one never knows who might drop in."

________________

*The Whale City Bakery was originally known as ‘The Davenport Bakery’ and was owned by the Caiocca’s, Gilbert, Mary, William and Leo. It was later purchased by the Morelli’s (Patty’s mother and father) and re-named the Miramar.

After her own hotel ( Hotel D’Italia) in Davenport, was destroyed by fire (1945), my Godmother Pina Micossi entered into partnership with the Caioccas and then continued on, for a time, with the Morelli’s. Thus, the Davenport Bakery, Miramar, and presently the Whale City Bakery has some serious “La Nostra Costa” history behind it.

Thank you very much for your visit, Your Majesty.

Ivano Franco Comelli is the author of “La Nostra Costa” (Our Coast), published by Authorhouse (2006): http://www.authorhouse.com/





Friday, September 12, 2008

LIDO'S ITALIAN FILM FESTIVAL 2008

'Clicca' on images to enlarge.



'FIGLIO DELLA COSTA' LIDO CANTARUTTI ANNOUNCES PROGRAM FOR ITALIAN FILM FESTIVAL IN SAN RAFAEL, CA, OCTOBER 4 TO NOVEMBER 15, 2008.

FOR LIST OF FILMS TO BE PRESENTED, AND DIRECTIONS TO THE MARIN CENTER SHOWCASE THEATER, PLEASE GO TO LIDO'S WEBSITE: http://www.italianfilm.com/







Future Italian Film Festival Director Lido Cantarutti with Gervasio 'Bronco' Comelli (my father) in Felton, Ca 1946.
(Read about the Cantarutti Family in my book
"La Nostra Costa", Chapter 13, ' Tre Famiglie Friulani
(Three Friulian Families)

Saturday, September 06, 2008

MAL OCCHIO BY LAWRENCE DISTASI


THOSE OF YOU WHO HAVE ATTENDED ONE OR MORE OF MY PRESENTATIONS HAVE HEARD ME MENTION THE NAME LAWRENCE DISTASI, THE PROJECT DIRECTOR OF THE HISTORICAL PROJECT UNA STORIA SEGRETA. LARRY WAS ALSO THE EDITOR OF THE BOOK "UNA STORIA SEGRETA: THE SECRET HISTORY OF ITALIAN AMERICAN EVACUATION AND INTERNMENT DURING WORLD WAR II." HE WAS GRACIOUS ENOUGH TO INCLUDE MY ARTICLE : "WRONG SIDE OF THE HIGHWAY" IN THE BOOK.

LARRY HAS RECENTLY COME OUT WITH A PAPERBACK VERSION OF "MAL OCCHIO", A BOOK ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN HARD BACK. BELOW IS A SYNOPSIS OF THE BOOK WITH ORDERING FORM. I HAVE ALSO INCLUDE A SHORT BIO ON THIS AMAZING MAN.






NOW IN PAPERBACK--WITH A NEW AFTERWORD BY THE AUTHOR.....
MAL OCCHIO
{evil eye}
The Underside of Vision
By Lawrence DiStasi

Starting from memories of his own Italian American family, Lawrence DiStasi launches an inquiry that ultimately probes universal dimensions of the human psyche. Intrigued by the folkway of mal occhio (evil eye), he follows a spiraling path into realms that have haunted humans in every Western culture.
Not only in Italian villages, but on every continent, from ancient times to the present, there are people who believe that a glance can cause illness or physical harm to those it strikes: young children, dairy cows, field crops, and pregnant women. Early observations of his great-aunt’s ability to diagnose and cure these attacks--with incantations and drops of olive oil in a bowl of water--were the author’s introduction to the rituals, amulets, and other preventatives that surround this core of belief.
But the book does not stop there. DiStasi investigates the social and cultural dynamics of evil eye: its influences on child-rearing, domestic relationships, and ethnic worldviews, its source in images of the mother goddess, spirals and vortices. Finally, Mal Occhio confronts the problem historically symbolized by the evil eye: the pervasive anxiety associated with vision. And DiStasi’s interpretation of eye symbolism, as evidenced in motifs that appear throughout the ancient world, is his contemplation, finally, of the self itself---its shifting nature, its estrange-ment, and humankind’s struggle to make it whole.

______________

“This is one man’s fancy on folklore raised, by quest of curiosity and quality of language, to literary contribution.” Art Seidenbaum, Los Angeles Times

“Lawrence DiStasi’s Mal Occhio is a classic of Italian American literature. This new edition, with its fresh Afterword, reveals the author at his best. DiStasi’s work shows how a focused and informed attention can find in things that others have overlooked or forgotten the sources of a resonant historiography with deep roots and wide implications. Mal Occhio proceeds from the study of humble and ancient material practices to a contemplation of the abiding dilemmas of human existence.” Robert Viscusi, Wolfe Institute for the Humanities, Brooklyn College



Please send _______ copies of MAL OCCHIO: The Underside of Vision by Lawrence DiStasi

@ $15.95 each copy. Please add $3.00 per copy for postage and handling. California residents add 8% sales tax. Send check or money order to: SANNITI PUBLICATIONS,
P.O. Box 533, Bolinas, CA 94924

Total enclosed $_______________


(Orders can also be placed by sending an email to: lwdistasi@sbcglobal.net.)
**********************************************************************************




Lawrence DiStasi
Lawrence DiStasi has worked as a writer, editor, teacher and historian since graduating from Dartmouth College (BA) and New York University (ABD). He has taught literature and composition at Gettysburg College, the University of California at Berkeley, and most recently in the Fall Freshman Program at UC Berkeley Extension. Since 1994, he has been project director of the historical exhibit, Una Storia Segreta: When Italian Americans Were "Enemy Aliens," shepherding it to more than fifty sites nationwide, and spearheading the movement it generated to pass "The Wartime Violation of Italian American Civil Liberties Act", signed into Public Law #106-451 by President William Jefferson Clinton. His published books include: MAL OCCHIO: The Underside of Vision (North Point Press: 1981), Dream Streets: The Big Book of Italian American Culture (Harper & Row: 1989), and Una Storia Segreta: The Secret History of Italian American Evacuation and Internment during World War II (Heyday Books: 2001). He lives in Bolinas, CA. View my complete profile

Friday, September 05, 2008

LA NOSTRA COSTA PRESENTATION AT THE SANTA CRUZ MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY OCT 11

Ivano (right) with Andrew and Jean Hsu on their mushroom farm 'nel buco' on the Gulch Ranch, located on the Coast Road, 2.5 miles north of Santa Cruz. Ivano practically grew up 'nel buco' (in the hole).

Ivano will be making a presentation at the Santa Cruz Museum of Arts and History on
Saturday, Oct 11, from 10:00a-1200n. Hope to see you there.


Borrowed the announcement below from the Santa Cruz Sentinel website: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/



Researchers Anonymous: La Nostra Costa
Saturday, Oct 11 10:00a to 12:00p
at http://events.santacruzsentinel.com/santa-cruz-ca/venues/show/11917-museum-of-art-history-the-mcpherson-center, Santa Cruz, CA
Join Ivano Comelli, author of La Nostra Costa for a lecture and discussion about the history and development of Davenport and the North Coast. Location: MAH Auditorium, 10am
Price: free/donations welcome
Phone: (831) 429-1964
Event Web Site
Age Suitability: 18 and up
Tags: There are no tags.
Join Ivano Comelli, author of La Nostra Costa for a lecture and discussion about the history and development of Davenport and the North Coast. Location: MAH Auditorium, 10am
Event Web Site
Categories: Museums, History
Creator: tmyers
Creator: tmyers

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Richard Huerta As I Remember Him (Updated)

Richard Huerta as I remember him. The above photo was taken at a BBQ held in my backyard in San Jose in 1969. A year later on August 6, 1970, Richard Huerta was shot and killed in the line of duty. (Also in the photo Richard's friend Jane and on his left San Jose PD Sgt. Ray O'beirne. The blond lady in front is my aunt Lina Gemignani.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hello
I am currently a recruit in the San Jose (Police) Academy. I had spoken with the training staff about doing a presentation for the Academy class. I was assigned to do a presentation on fallen Officer Richard E. Huerta.

As I was browsing the Internet, I noticed a blog that you had written about Richard Huerta. From what I understand, you were a close friend. I am contacting you to inquire if I could ask you some questions about him. I would like to put together an informative presentation and your help would be greatly appreciated.


Ivano said:

Thanks for contacting me. Yes, I was a very close friend of Richard Huerta. I have written a book "La Nostra Costa" (Our Coast); although the book is mostly about my parents and other Italians who settled on the North Coast of Santa Cruz , I do include a Chapter on my Police Experience at SJPD. Included in that Chapter is a recount of the night that Richard was killed (August 6, 1970) and the impact it had on me and my family. The book is available at the Morgan Hill Library and can be requested at any Santa Clara County Library Branch.

Also on this Blog you can access all the articles that I have written about Richard by typing in his name in the "search blog" space located at the top left hand corner. It is most interesting to read the comments to those articles made by his brother officers. (One of the articles includes a retelling of the night that Richard was killed by Dave Brickell, one of the Investigators at the scene.)

I live in Morgan Hill. Feel free to contact me at any time and we can arrange a meeting somewhere in this area.
Thanks for using the LNostra-Costa Blog as a part of your research on Officer Richard Huerta.
UPDATE**********UPDATE*************UPDATE***************UPDATE**********
9-03-08
Ramon:
Thanks again for having me at your presentation at the San Jose Police Academy. It was great. You did an excellent job researching and then presenting the material. I learned somethings that I did not know about Richard. I sure enjoyed being there.

Maybe I was too forward in suggesting that you scan my phot0 album (of Richard's funeral ) and make a new one for the San Jose Police Library. I know that you are busy and might not have the time. On the other hand the album with a summary of your presentation would be a great edition for the library . If you have time, fine, if not maybe I can conjure something up. Let me know.

I still would like the summary of your presentation so I can put it on my blog. I think my readers would be very interested in it.

Thanks again and "Sempre Avanti".

Ivan(0)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Also attending Ramon's presentation was Officer Jaime Saldivar, one of Richard's cousins.
Some of you may recall that I mention Jaime in 'La Nostra Costa', endnote 95, page 337:
"In the July 2004, publication of The Vanguard, the official publication of the San Jose Police Officers' Association, Officer Jaime Saldivar writes a poignant and emotional article on attending Thompson's last parole hearing on April 21,2004. At that hearing, Thompson was denied parole. His next parole hearing is scheduled for the year 2008."
Jamie informed me that Emile Thompson, Richard Huerta's killer, has already had his parole hearing. Parole was once again denied. Next Parole Hearing, 2012. Thompson, who was in his early twenties at the time of the killing, will be in his sixties by 2012.

Thursday, August 14, 2008

LA FEDORA SWINGS








AS YOU KNOW THE 'OLD RANCERE' wears an old fedora hat when making his public appearances. I adopted the fedora hat and the 'sciavola' as the symbols of the 'bagnatori' ( irrigators) who irrigated the crops 'su per la costa' of old. The fedora that the 'Old Rancere' wears is actually the last hat my father, Bronco, wore. (It is over thirty years old now. ) Of late, I have notice that the only people who wear fedoras any more are the young ladies. (Brittney Spears is often photographed with a fedora hat.) Imagine my surprise when I received the above pamphlet in the mail from Gavilan College in Gilroy. The handsome young man in the photo may start a new trend........... don't you think?












Posted below is an article 'borrowed from "wikipedia' the free on line dictionary,


http://www.wikipedia.org/ . It tells you all you want to know about the famous fedora hat.


Fedora
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Fedora (hat))
Jump to: navigation, search
For the Linux distribution, see Fedora (operating system). For other uses, see Fedora (disambiguation).

This article needs additional citations for verification.Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2008)

This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims.Please improve the article by adding references. See the talk page for details. (July 2008)

A fedora that has been pinched at the front and being worn pushed back on the head, with the front of the brim bent down over the eyes.
A fedora is a soft felt hat that is creased lengthwise down the crown and pinched in the front on both sides. Similar hats with a C-crown (with an indentation for the head in the top of the crown) are occasionally called fedoras. The brim goes all the way around, and often there will be a hat band as well. A trilby hat is somewhat similar to a fedora, but typically has a shorter brim, and the back of the brim is distinctively more sharply upturned as a result.
The term fedora was in use as early as 1891. Beginning in the 20th century, the fedora came into use as an upper-class clothing accessory. Hats that resemble the soft felt version are often called fedoras even if they are made of straw or twill. Fedoras did not start to become widespread until the late 1910s. Its popularity soared, and eventually it eclipsed the similar-looking Homburg by the 1930s. Fedoras can be found in nearly any color imaginable, but black, grey, and tan/brown are the most popular.
Contents[hide]
1 History
2 Etiquette
3 Fedoras in popular culture
4 References
5 External links
//

[edit] History

A fedora made by Borsalino
The word fedora comes from the title of an 1882 play by Victorien Sardou. Princess Fédora, the heroine of the play, wore a hat similar to a fedora. In the early part of the twentieth century, the fedora was popular in cities for its stylishness, ability to protect the wearer's head from the wind and weather, and the fact that it could be rolled up when not in use. Since the early part of the 20th century, many Haredi and other Orthodox Jews have worn black fedoras and continue to this day.
The hat is sometimes associated with Prohibition-era gangsters and the detectives who sought to bring them to justice. In Hollywood movies of the 1940s, characters often wore a fedora, particularly when playing private detectives, gangsters, or other "tough guy" roles. A trench coat was frequently part of the costume, a notable example being Humphrey Bogart's character in Casablanca. The fedora is widely recognized with the characters of The Blues Brothers, Indiana Jones, and Freddy Krueger. The fedora is closely associated with film noir characters. In the case of action/adventure films, such as old "B"-movies, and the Indiana Jones series they inspired, the fedora served the practical purpose of hiding the face sufficiently to allow doubles to perform the more dangerous stunts seamlessly.
Like the bowler hat, the fedora fell out of usage and popularity during the late 1950s and early 1960s. The hat began to lose favor even earlier on the west coast of the United States, which is known for its more casual clothing. The early 1950s switch from large lapels and ties to thin ones, resulted in shorter-brimmed hats, and this likely played a role in the fedora eventually being deemed a non-essential item. Also playing a part was the shrinking automobiles of the mid-1950s, which often made it difficult to wear a hat while driving. By the early 1970s, the fedora was seen as a dead fashion, typically only worn by older and/or more traditional men.
The demise of hat use by American men was quite abrupt. One hypothesis explaining the sudden shift places the date for the change as January 20, 1961, when John F. Kennedy supposedly chose not to wear a hat to his inauguration. However, There is ample photographic and journalistic evidence that President Kennedy indeed wore a top hat to his inauguration ceremony, only removing it when he gave his speech.[1][2]
Fedoras have staged something of a comeback as of the 2000s.[citation needed] This trend seems to be expanding particularly fast in the rock and indie communities, where artists such as Pete Doherty have been seen donning a trilby (a fedora variant) at concerts and live performances.

[edit] Etiquette
Traditionally, when a man doffs this hat, he grasps a fedora by the crown (though it can and does do damage over time). If there is a strong wind it is acceptable to anchor a fedora using the "wind trolley" found on some fedoras. This elastic band can be taken off the crown and wound through the button hole of a suit lapel. Hats, including the fedora, are typically doffed indoors, except in public areas such as lobbies or elevators. If a man wearing a fedora enters into a conversation with a lady, custom dictates that he doff his hat.

[edit] Fedoras in popular culture

Lists of miscellaneous information should be avoided. Please relocate any relevant information into appropriate sections or articles. (August 2008)

This section does not cite any references or sources.Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unverifiable material may be challenged and removed. (August 2008)
University of Alabama football coach Paul "Bear" Bryant is noted for wearing a black and white houndstooth fedora cap.
Singer Dean Martin is seen wearing a fedora cap in many photos.
Anatomist Gunther von Hagens always wears a fedora in public, even while performing dissections in front of audiences.
The fictional character, Indiana Jones is known specifically by his iconic brown fedora.
The DC comic book character The Question wears a fedora.
The Red Hat logo features a red fedora on its Shadow Man logo. In addition, the Red Hat community-oriented distribution of Linux is called Fedora.
The logo of newsreader Forté Agent is a person wearing a fedora.
The logo of the production company Flyte Tyme is a pair of walking legs under a fedora.
ZootFly prominently features a yellow fedora in its logo.
The characters Joliet Jake Blues and Elwood Blues, along with other characters, wore black fedoras or trilbies in the 1980 movie "The Blues Brothers.
Synyster Gates of the metal band Avenged Sevenfold often wears a fedora.
The lead singer of Three Days Grace, Adam Gontier, often wears a fedora during their concerts.
In L. Ron Hubbard's fiction, the Marcab Confederacy had a custom of wearing fedoras. It has become a trend among Anonymous to wear fedoras at anti-Scientology protests.
The TV and video game character Carmen Sandiego's trademark costume includes a red fedora with a yellow band.
Singer Michael Jackson has worn fedoras during his concerts.
Musician Roger Cicero is known to wear fedoras, and his fans often wear them to his concerts.
Switchfoot frontman Jon Foreman has been known to wear fedoras. It is becoming a trend among Switchfoot fans to wear fedoras to the band's concerts.
Gym Class Heroes frontman Travis McCoy has been known to wear fedoras.
Singer David Archuleta was photographed wearing a fedora on the red carpet of the world premiere of the movie WALL-E in Los Angeles on June 21, 2008.
Harry "the Hat" Gittes, a recurring character on Cheers, wore a white and black fedora.
Ben Croshaw of the video review column Zero Punctuation wears a black fedora, and includes a fedora in his logo.
Singer/Songwriter Jason Mraz and Ne-Yo have been known to wear fedoras.
The character Freddy Kruger of the horror movie series A Nightmare on Elm Street wears a fedora.
Sylvester Stallone wears a fedora in the movie Rocky Balboa.
In the stage production The Phantom of the Opera, the Phantom wears a fedora in three scenes.
Pro wrester The Miz fedora during his entrances and interviews.

[edit] References
^ Kennedy and Eisenhower at Inauguration, 1961, Viewimages. Retrieved on January 4, 2008.
^ http://www.snopes.com/history/american/jfkhat.asp

[edit] External links
Hat etiquette






!


NOW THATSA FEDORA!














Monday, August 04, 2008

GUGLIELMO'S CORK EQUITY DAY NUMERO XXI

************************ 'Romping and A-Stomping' at Guglielmos'*******************



SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 2008. SEE DETAILS BELOW:


BOTTLE YOUR OWN RED WINE: GUGLIELMO’S CORK EQUITY DAY #21,SATURDAY, AUGUST 9, 2008 – 10 AM – 3 PM. ‘RAIN OR SHINE.’CORK EQUITY n: Definition: A method of saving big money by getting hands on involvement assisting in the bottling, corking and labeling of your own premium wine. Nearly six thousand wine lovers have turned up at our cellar door on Cork Equity Day looking for a great bottle of wine at a great price. Few have been disappointed! Don’t miss your chance to meet some friends, have some fun, hear some great Italian music, enjoy our complimentary bread and cheese, plus earn access to our Chef's Table featuring or famous grilled sausages with purchase of a case or more.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


IVANO SAYS: AS USUAL THE ‘OLD RANCERE’ WILL ONCE AGAIN BE PRESENT TO SELL AND SIGN COPIES OF “LA NOSTRA COSTA” (OUR COAST), AND POSSIBLY SING A FEW ITALIAN SONGS OF OLD. HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE.

GUGLIELMO ‘S
1480 EAST MAIN AVENUE
MORGAN HILL, CA 95037(408) 779-3166 http://www.guglielmowinery.com/
DIRECTIONS: FROM SAN JOSE TAKE HWY 101 TO E.DUNNE AVE OFF RAMP. TURN LEFT ON E.DUNNE AVE. PROCEED ACROSS HWY 101 OVER-PASS TO CONDIT RD.(2ND STOP LIGHT). TURN LEFT ON CONDIT RD AN PROCEED NORTH 0.8MI TO E.MAIN AVE.(NEXT STOP LIGHT). TURN RIGHT ON E.MAIN AVE. AND PROCEED APPROXIMATELY 1/2MI TO WINERY ON YOUR RIGHT. (LIVE OAK HIGH SCHOOL IS ACROSS THE STREET.)------



FROM: SANTA CRUZ-WATSONVILLE-SALINAS-GILROY, GET ON HWY 101 AND PROCEED NORTH TO E.DUNNE AVE. OFF RAMP. TURN RIGHT ON E. DUNNE AVE TO CONDIT RD (FIRST STOP LIGHT). TURN LEFT ON CONDIT RD. AND PROCEED NORTH 0.8MI TO E.MAIN AVE.(NEXT STOP LIGHT.) TURN RIGHT ON E.MAIN AVE. AND PROCEED ABOUT 1/2 MILE TO THE WINERY ON YOUR RIGHT.
BUONA FORTUNA E SEMPRE AVANTI. IVANO

Saturday, July 26, 2008

IT'S A KNOCKOUT!!!!

FRIULANO PRIMO CARNERA KNOCKS OUT JACK SHARKEY TO WIN THE HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP OF THE WORLD - 1933 (Photo courtesy of the 'Canadian Furlan')



Now that I have gotten your attention.......I just wanted to announce that the 'LNostra-Costa Blagga' is two years old. Yes, your old 'Blaggatore' launched it on July 27, 2006. This is my 138th posting on the 'Blagga" My how time flies when you are having fun. And yes, I have had much fun.

Originally the 'Blagga's" purpose was to publicize my book "La Nostra Costa" (Our Coast). However, it quickly developed into something much more. This was because many of you submitted articles, photos and stories about your family and friends. Without your support the 'Blagga' would have floundered. I want to especially thank: Gino 'd'Baffi' Campioni the official Italian translator for the 'Blagga', Norma Dinelli Wilson (LaNorma), who submitted numerous articles and photos relating to 'La Costa' [and also her husband Al Wilson, who took many photos at my book signings]; Doriano, the 'Canadian Furlan', historian extra-ordinarier of the Furlan culture; Thelma (Micossi) Gill, who has been my eyewitness to my boyhood memories of Davenport and 'La Costa'; Marvin Del Chiaro, my 'old' college roommate who contributed articles and photos to the 'Blagga'; Reno Cantarutti who keeps reminding me of events that occurred 'su per la costa' that I should have remembered and everyone else who sent articles or made comments. [Speaking of comments: I must not forget to thank Carolina 'Carrie' Cariola for her frequent colorful and insightful comments. Truly a delight 'Carrie'.]

Since there are 138 articles on the 'Blagga' it is sometimes difficult to 'pull' them up for display.
Here is a helpful tip. AT THE UPPER LEFT HAND (YOUR LEFT) CORNER OF THE FRONT PAGE, THERE IS A BLANK SPACE FOR SEARCHING THE BLOG. TYPE ANY WORD (FAMILY NAME, TOPIC, TOWN OR A GROUP OF DESCRIPTIVE WORDS). IF AN ARTICLE HAS BEEN WRITTEN ON IT, THE 'BLAGGA' WILL DISPLAY IT. FOR EXAMPLE; IF YOU TYPE ITALIAN DICTIONARY IN THE SPACE AND THEN 'CLICCA' SEARCH THIS BLOG, GINO'S FAMOUS ITANGLISH DICTIONARY WILL 'POP-UP' AND ALSO, AS A BONUS, HIS ITALIAN FAMILY NAME LIST.

In addition, as you probably already know, the articles published on the 'Blagga' are often picked up by the Google scrawler. As often happens, persons around the world researching family names, etc. are referred to articles on this blog. I have met several interesting people who did just that. Recently, I just heard from a 'Furlana' who lives in the Morgan Hill area. Searching the word 'Furlan' or Friulan on Google she came up with the 'Blagga' and my name. Up to that time she thought she was the only Furlan in the area. Sempre Avanti. ivn0



BTW: You still can order "La Nostra Costa" (Our Coast) through the publisher, Authorhouse, by going online at: http://www.authorhouse.com/ or order by phone at 1-888-7715. And, of course, you can order it through your favorite bookstore. I am told that it makes for a great gift and it is an excellent way to spread the word about our life 'su per la costa'.

Sunday, July 20, 2008

IL CAPITANO FRANK MICOSSI AND THE FUSARI FAMILY

IL CAPITANO FRANK MICOSSI (right) WITH ZVAN DEL LOSC (center), IVANO'S GRANFATHER; AND A MICOSSI FAMILY RELATIVE (left) IN NIMIS, ITALY, C. 1945. [Photo courtesy of my cousins, Cesare and Anna Maria Comelli. Nimis , Italy.]


JOLENE'S GRANDPARENTS: LUIGI AND RACHELE FUSARI




JOLENE'S GRANDMOTHER RACHELE (PIFFERO) FUSARI AND HER FIRST BORN DAUGHTER, PALMA






GROUP PHOTO OF THE FUSARI FAMILY: FRONT ROW (l-r): RACHELE (MOLLIE) WITH DAUGHTER PALMA; BACK ROW (l-r): RACHELE'S THREE SONS, JOE, DELL, AND SAM.









VINE HILL SCHOOL

















FUSARI VINE HILL RANCH













In my book 'La Nostra Costa', I write about the Micossi Family, Tony and Rosie and their children Frank and Rena. [Chapter 12: 'La Strada Per Pescadero (The Road to Pescadero), pages 131-134]. On page 137, I have a photo of Frank Miccosi [c.1945] who was then stationed in Northern Italy as a Captain in the US Army. As I write in the book, Frank or "Franchin" (fran keen') as we use to call him, was a boyhood hero to my brother John and me when we were growing up 'su per la costa'. Il Capitano Frank Micossi was also a hero in Nimis, Italy [his father's as well as my father's hometown]. In the book I write: "While there, (Frank) bought surplus U.S. Army supplies and food, and distributed the items among the war-lorn citizens." He is still remembered there today.







Because of the Internet and the LNOSTRA-COSTA Blog, Jolene Fusari, a cousin of Frank Micossi sent me the following e-mail and photos above:






Dear Ivan,



My name is Jolene Fusari. I do some family genealogy and last night as I was looking up some information on my cousin, Frank Micossi, I came across your (very) interesting blog. I also recognized some of the names that are mentioned.


Frank's Mother, Rosina (Fusari) Micossi, married Antonio (Tony) Micossi. In 1920. Tony and partner Charles Bergamini had a Hotel on Cooper Street in Santa Cruz. Rosie and my Nono, Luigi Fusari, were sister and brother. The Fusari family came from Castiglione, Massacarra, Italy. Nono Luigi married Rachele Piffero (my Nona).
My Nono, Luigi had a brother Edward. Together they had a ranch up on Vine Hill. There they planted grape vineyards, apples, pears, cherries, etc.. They also made Wine. I remember hearing that people used to come out from Santa Cruz to drink wine, eat bread and cheese; then when they left they would take a few bottles along with them to drink on the way home. When the bottles were empty they would just through them out along the way. It is said that if you search (hard enough) along the side of Branciforte Drive, you can still fine some of those old bottles. My father told me that when he was a kid and was in school, (I believe it must have been during prohibition), he saw my uncle Ed driving past….. going like a bat out hell, with the “revenuers” hot on his tail. (The old Vinehill School Is still there, but it is a house now. I remember living in it for a while as a child with my Nona. My cousin Louie still has property on Vine Hill, but it is a lot less than it used to be. I was raised there and I loved it. (I enjoyed) many happy times. )



Amadeo Piffero, my Nona's father brought her to this country; my Nono Fusari brought her brother Francesco (Frank) Piffero, her sister Leopoldina (Polda) Piffero, Vitale Adolfo Piffero and his wife Louigina (they were my Godparents) to this country. The Piffero's, were from, Spoccia, Novara, Italy. Polda married Pete Locatelli. They had two daughters Eva Locatelli (Pini) and Mabel Locatelli. Pete owned a hotel and restaurant on Pacific Avenue in Santa Cruz, I don't remember the name of it, but I do remember going there with my Nona, when she would go to help out.


I (will always) remember the first time I saw my cousin, Frank Micossi. It was in the 1940's and was a little girl then. There was a big party at the Vine Hill School House Lots of people were there and they had music.( It may have been when he came home from Italy after the war, or maybe before he left.) There he was, this tall handsome man in uniform. I must have been bugging him so he finely danced with me. (There) I was, standing on his shoes as we danced and I totally fell in love with him and I have had a crush on him all of my life. No one ever knew but me …… until now. Now you know (my big secret).

Unfortunately, Frank died much too young. I know that he died in Monterey on April 7, 1967. He was only 49 years old.

I was born in Santa Cruz on June 21, 1942, My Father's Name was Joseph Louis Fusari, my mother's name was Dorothy Marie Blake. My Father's brothers names were Augustino (Sam), Adolfo (Dell), His sister was Palma. Sam work all his life for Big Creek Lumber, as did his sons Louie and Augie.

More about Frank: I believe it must have been his dream to become an actor as he attended acting school, 'Pasadena playhouse College of Theatre Arts'. He was in a play called 'Pillars of Society' February 13 to 18th of 1939. He played Johan Tonnesen in the play. I have been to the Holy Cross Cemetery(Santa Cruz) and have taken pictures of Family Head stones, I thought it would be a good way to keep tract of birth and death dates, I have Frank's. I haven't been there in a long time. I live south in a little town called Santa Paula, in Ventura County about 60 miles from Los Angeles. My brother Gary Fusari still lives in Santa Cruz, he a custom home building Contractor. I am sending you a couple photos, one is of my grandmother Rachele Fusari, it is a beautiful Photo, my Favorite. The other a photo of her and from left to right, my dad Joe, Dell, Sam and sister Palma Fusari. I may have one of Frank taken in Italy, I will send it also, maybe you can tell me if it is.


I don't know if you knew any of the people I have mentioned or not let me know. Waiting to hear from you .


Jolene



IVANO SAYS: Thanks Jolene. What a wonderful story to remind all of us of Frank. Yes, he died much too young. I miss him a lot. Hopefully, my fellow 'blaggatori' will recognize the names you mentioned and will come forward with some additional information. Also, thank you for sharing your beautiful photos with us. 'Con un bacin d'mor'. Ivano










Jolene also sent the above photo, however, she was unable to ID the two persons in it. It was such a beautiful photo that I decided to publish it anyway. Perhaps someone might recognize the man and the women in the photo. First prize is a guided tour of 'La Nostra Costa' by that noted author Ivano Franco Comelli.








Thursday, July 17, 2008

MESSAGE/INQUIRY FROM ANDY

Most likely they have some information for Andy.....don't you think?
(See comments for photo IDs)
IVANO SAYS:

ANDY LEFT A MESSAGE ON ONE OF MY EARLIER POSTS. I THOUGHT I WOULD POST IT HERE AT THE TOP OF THE 'BLAGGA' . ANY INFORMATION CAN BE POSTED AS A COMMENT TO THIS MESSAGE OR SEND DIRECTLY TO MY E-MAIL ADDRESS.



ANDY has left a new comment on your post "HAPPY BIRTHDAY GIOVANNI PRIMO":


HI,MY GREAT GRAND FATHER WAS PIO SCARONI, THE DAIRY BEFORE KATY SCARONI PLACE, MY MOTHERS MAIDEN NAME WAS DOROTHY ANNAND. I AM LOOKING FOR INFORMATION ON S.K. ANNAND WHO TOOK OVER THE DAIRY AFTER PIO MOVED INTO TOWN ON LAURENT STREET - HE ALSO MARRIED MY GRAND MOTHER. COULD YOU HELP ME OUT ON WHERE I COULD FIND SUCH INFO.THANKS,ANDY CARCELLOPS. MY FATHER OWNED MISSION PHARMACY FOR 57 YRS. LENA BROVIA WORKED FOR US.


Posted by ANDY to lnostra-costa at 3:44 PM

Saturday, July 12, 2008

FIGLIO DELLA COSTA FREDDIE DEL CHIARO; FIGLIA DELLA COSTA NEVA RINALDI ONETO -Remembered


THE FOLLOWING REMEMBRANCES WERE PUBLISHED IN THE SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL THIS WEEK.


- FREDDIE -


Alfred Louis Del Chiaro

Services will be Sunday for Alfred Louis Del Chiaro who passed away July 8, 2008 at home in Santa Cruz surrounded by his loving family. He was 79 years old.
He was born in Santa Cruz on December 23, 1928, the son of Giuseppe and Pia Lombardi Del Chiaro. He grew up in Santa Cruz where he attended local schools and was a graduate of Santa Cruz High School, Class of 1946. Following high school he attended Hartnell College for two years and then went to work for the Bank of America for a short time. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After his return from the service he worked with his father in farming at the Gordola Ranch. He later worked as a foreman for John Ingles Frozen Foods and Pfyffer Bontadelli Associates.
Freddie was a member of the Marconi Club, Italian Catholic Federation, Sons of Italy and the Santa Cruz Elks Club. He enjoyed traveling with his son David and his best friend, Tony Franceschini. He loved farming, gardening and also enjoyed woodworking. He made many beautiful bird houses and shrines.
He is survived by his loving wife of 57 years, Betty Del Chiaro of Santa Cruz; son, David Del Chiaro of Santa Cruz; mother, Pia Del Chiaro of Santa Cruz; sister and brother in law, Diana and Danny Petrolino of Santa Cruz; sister in law and brother in law, Eva and Albert Quilici of Santa Cruz; aunt, Lena Passarino of Santa Cruz; nephews, Gary Quilici and Randy Quilici and his wife, Roxann; nieces, Elaine Padilla and her husband Frank and Patricia McNeal all of Santa Cruz and Cori Gabbert and her husband Mike of Granite Bay, CA. He is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and other extended family in Santa Cruz and in Italy.
A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at Holy Cross Catholic Church, 126 High St, Santa Cruz, CA Sunday July 13, 2008 at 7:00 pm. A visitation will be held at the church Sunday evening from 6 pm to service time. A private entombment will be in Holy Cross Cemetery.
The family wishes to express their heartfelt thanks to Dr. Tracy Maclay, Dr. James Glancey, Dr. Patrick Shields, Hospice of Santa Cruz, Dr. Thomas Larson and Fr. Mike Cross.
Contributions may be made to Hospice of Santa Cruz County, 940 Disc Dr. Scotts Valley, Ca or your favorite charity.Published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel from 7/10/2008 - 7/11/2008


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- NEVA -


Services will be Tuesday for Neva Oneto who was taken by the Lord to eternal happiness. She passed away July 6, 2008 after a long and courageous battle with cancer with her loving family by her side. She was 77 years old.
Neva was born November 17, 1930 in Santa Cruz. She was the daughter of Rinaldo and Maria Rinaldi. As a child her family and extended family worked in agriculture and as a result Neva grew up living on the coast road. She was a graduate of Santa Cruz High School.
In her younger years she worked in banking and later worked for Santa Cruz City Schools in food service for over 20 years. She was a life long member of Holy Cross Church. She was a loving and devoted wife and mother and was always there to help members of her family and friends. She enjoyed family activities, gardening, crossword puzzles, music, movies, socializing and travel. She was an avid lifelong San Francisco 49'er and Giants fan.
She was preceded in death by her husband of 55 years, Joseph Oneto and her parents, Rinaldo and Maria Rinaldi.
She is survived by her sons, Steve Oneto and Dan Oneto of Santa Cruz; brother, Reno Rinaldi of Salinas; granddaughters, Jenny Oneto and Erin Oneto and her great grandson, Philip all of Santa Cruz. Neva will be deeply missed by her family and all who knew her.
A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at Holy Cross Church, 126 High St, Santa
Cruz, CA Tuesday July 15, 2008 at 2:00 pm. Arrangements are under the direction of Benito & Azzaro Pacific Gardens Chapel, 1050 Cayuga St, Santa Cruz, CA. A private entombment will be in Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Hospice of Santa Cruz, 940 Disc Dr., Scotts Valley or Heartland Hospice, 2511 Garden Rd., Monterey, Ca.Published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel from 7/10/2008 - 7/12/2008



ADDIO FREDDIE AND NEVA. UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN ACROSS 'IL ULTIMO PONTE.



Wednesday, July 09, 2008

SANTA CRUZ HIGH SCHOOL -Fund Raiser

Santa Cruz High School - 2006. Photo taken by Roger 'Ruggero' Princevalle




Photo: Memorial Field with the City of Santa Cruz and Santa Cruz High School in the Background.
(c. 1954)


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I received the f ollowing e-mail and accompanying Santa Cruz Sentinel article from Len Klempnauer, SCHS Class of '54 Alum:

As you probably know, the Rotary Club is currently undergoing a campaign to raise $750,000 in community donations to rehabilitate the Santa Cruz High track and football field.


The SCHS Class of 1954 already has contributed $1,000 to the fund-raising drive, and I have been told the Class of 1956 also is considering make a class donation.
I was wondering whether your Class of 1955 might be interested is making a donation.
In our case, we were going to donate $250 from our class general fund (money we've saved up over the years from reunions) and ask if any of our classmates would individually like to contribute the remaining $750. As it turned out, four of my '54 classmates each contributed $250, so we didn't have to take the money from our fund. (Instead, we'll be able to add that amount to the perpetual Class of 1954 Scholarship administered by the alumni association that we set up this year.)
If you're interested, the Rotary contacts are Jon Sisk, senior vice president of Lighthouse Bank, and Ken Whiting of Whiting's Foods. Sisk can be reached at jsisk@lighthousebank.net and Whiting at ken@whitingsfood.com.
I'm sure many of you have email contacts with other members of the Class of '55, so you may want to send this suggestion to them.
Below is an article about the campaign that was published in the Sentinel.
-- Len Klempnauer, Capitola
P.S. Wouldn't it be great if all of the SCHS classes from the Fifties would contribute $1,000 apiece? If you have any contacts in other classes, could you pass on this information. I've already sent a similar email to Bob Lemmon of the Class of 1957.

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The following story about the Memorial Field fund-raising drive was published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel on Sunday, May 4, 2008.Headline: Santa Cruz High Track and Field Project Needs $750K. More than a decade has passed since Santa Cruz High School -- home to a dusty, narrow dirt track -- has hosted a meet on its own turf, forced instead to play at other schools or area parks that offer better facilities.Speaking of turf, the adjacent infield at the school's Memorial Track and Field has more craters than the moon. The football and soccer teams can host the occasional competition, but the bumpy battleground is a potential minefield for twisted ankles, errant passes and broken hearts. With no real "home field," students are far less likely to support their peers by traveling to other schools to watch them compete, say supporters of the effort to improve facilities."There'd be a lot more school spirit" if the facility at the 113-year-old school was in better shape, said junior soccer player and track team member Kelsey Johnson.If the Santa Cruz Sunrise Rotary Club is successful in raising $750,000, 10 years worth of dreams for a new track and field might actually come true by next year. Thanks to a $500,000 boost from Rotary charity bike rides, a $750,000 investment from the school district and other community pledges totaling nearly $500,000, a planning committee has cobbled together about three-quarters, or $1.7 million, of the project's estimated $2.5 million cost.Committee leaders Ken Whiting, former Rotary Club president, and brother-in-law Jon Sisk are launching a big push to raise the final amount by this fall so the district can put the roughly 200,000-square-foot project out to bid while the construction market is still favorable due to the downward demand for new houses. The preliminary design plan was OK'd by the school board in December after several community forums, but the project can't move forward without all the money. "We want to leverage the monies we made through the bike rides into a complete project that would serve the school and community and stand there for the test of time," said Whiting, who, like wife Renee, graduated from the school in 1974. The couple's three daughters also are graduates, with the youngest, Jenny, running track for the school several years ago.Santa Cruz architect Steve Sutherland, whose daughter graduated from the school last year, said the "state of the art" project would take at least four months to construct after a contractor is chosen through a district bidding process. Though his firm, SSA Landscape Architects, has designed plans to eventually build new softball fields, expanded bleachers and a concession building, the track and field upgrades are all the district can afford right now.The new field would be made of polyethylene carpet supported underneath by an infill made of recycled tires. The track surface would be made of polyurethane, also supported by recycled rubber. Though there have been some community concerns about using artificial turfs, he said the synthetic materials are safe, reduce injuries and don't require watering, fertilizers and the maintenance hours the district can ill-afford.Assistant Cardinals track coach Bob Sanders, whose children Elle and Zeke are on the team, looks forward to the day when "finally there won't be bare spots" in the field."Whenever we travel to other school districts, they have really a nice track and field," Sanders said. "I always wondered why we couldn't offer our children the same type of facility."The track team uses the existing track for practice, but not to compete because the facility isn't regulation size and has no marked lanes. "That's a shame -- the kids deserve to have home track meets," he said. The district's assistant superintendent for business, Dick Moss, said parents and community members had to raise most of the funds privately because there is only so much money to go around for facility improvements, especially in tough budget times. This year, schools are bracing for at least 2.5 percent in state funding cuts thanks to the state's growing multibillion dollar deficit."A lot of facilities have needs in the district," Moss said, adding that Harbor High's track facility is also deteriorating. "Things like that tend to take a lower priority."Erik Redding, the boys athletic director at Santa Cruz High, applauded the efforts of Rotarians and others to get the project under way."Every year, we try to get things going," he said. "Finally, we just got to the point that we had some people wanted to take the bull by the horns."Those interested in donating to the project can make corporate gifts from $15,000-$20,000 and get advertising on bleachers or the scoreboard. Individual donors of $1,000 or more will receive a plaque on what will be called the Cardinal Wall of Fame at one of the entrances to the field.Freshman Elena Venable hopes enough donors chip in so she can run on the new track next spring and perhaps the rest of her athletic career at the school."It's kind of upsetting because my friends can't watch because they can't go to San Lorenzo Valley or Aptos," she said. "I'd like not having to drive somewhere, and it would make it easier to practice.”