Friday, December 23, 2011

OH CHRISTMAS TREE, OH CHRISTMAS TREE - BY GINO




It may have been around 1944. On a previous Christmas my mother (Ada Campioni) had decorated a very small tree. I can remember it well. It was only about a foot high and had a wooden cube for a stand, which was white with colored bells and candles painted on.

The decorations were glass globes of silver or gold color. Some were half-globes with
the hollow side painted in shiny colors of red, blue, and silver. (I still have the last one which survived my playing with them as a child.)That was the same tree that my mother set up for me in June one year, when I was ill with the
measles. That helped me so much to take my mind of my discomfort.

This particular year I so much wanted a real tree. Naturally, my dad “Baffi” was against buying something so expensive, especially since one could not eat a Christmas tree. In later years I realized that he was right. His entire life was devoted to feeding his family. Now at my age, I appreciate him all the more for his choices.

After a short session of grumbling about my request, he took a walk to the top of the hill North of our house.
(near the present site of the University of California, Santa Cruz) He returned with a few mushrooms and
a Redwood branch. “That’s no Christmas tree!” I wailed. “Be quiet and watch.” was my mother’s suggestion.
She produced some thread, and carefully tied the branches, which all grew in the same plane, as Redwoods do.
She pulled them into a spiral shape, and fastened them in place. When that tree received its ornaments, it was
a work of art! I got over my dislike of a redwood tree. Indeed it is the only Christmas tree which I have remembered
for my entire life. It was not so much the tree itself, but that my father had taken the time to do me such a much appreciated favor. I have told this story to some local friends, one of which said, “He must have loved you a lot.” He did indeed.


Saluti e Buon Natale, Gino


***********************************************************************************


IVANO SAYS: Thanks Gino for reminding us what Christmas is really about. Merry Christmas everybody e Sempre Avanti.

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

DECEMBER 7, 1941, "A DAY THAT WILL LIVE IN INFAMY'





IVANO SAYS: JUST IN CASE SOME OF US MAY HAVE FORGOTTEN WHAT DECEMBER 7, 1941, WAS ALL ABOUT, I'M PUBLISHING KRISTIAN'S (MY 13-YEAR OLD GRANDSON) CLASS ASSIGNMENT FOR TODAY.

December 7, 1941, ‘A DAY THAT WILL LIVE IN INFAMY’

On December 7, 1941, Japan, without declaring war, made a ’sneak attack’ on Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii, bombing our ships. Many ships were sunk and many American lives were lost. This ’sneak attack’ caught our armed forces stationed in Hawaii completely by surprise.

On December 8, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt went before Congress and declared that “December 7, 1941, was a day that will live in infamy .” By that he meant that the ‘sneak attack’ by Japan was a disgraceful and dishonorable act and would always be remembered that way. He demanded that Congress declare war on Japan.

Congress did declare war on Japan. Japan’s partners (Germany and Italy) declared war on the United States. The United States then declared war on Germany and Italy. The United States became fully involved in WW II.

Because many of the ships had been sunk, the United States could not attack back. It was also not prepared to defend itself. Many people thought that Japan would launch another attack on the west coast of the United States. Coast Guard Units and Army soldiers were set up all along the coast to look for enemy Japanese submarines and airplanes. Blackouts were ordered at night so the enemy could not see us. Laws were passed to make Japanese, German and Italians who lived in the United States to stay away from the Coast. Some lost there jobs and property; Some were forced to move inland.

To win the war, the United States called up many, many young men to serve. Some were volunteers, but most were drafted. This left many jobs without men to do the work at home. The women filled in and did most of those jobs. Factories that turned out cars, trucks, etc. were made to turn out war things such as airplanes and tanks. Restrictions were put on the amount of food, gasoline and other products you could buy at one time or not at all. Everybody was involved one way or another in this war.

The United States soon became strong enough to attack back. We became so strong that we beat the Germans in the first part of 1945. Later in 1945, we dropped Atomic bombs on Japan ending the war there. By doing so we began the Atomic Age.

The United State began the War as a nation that didn’t want to get involve in other nation’s wars. At the end of the War, we became the leader of the free world. We supported the United Nations and to this day are deeply involved in international affairs some involving undeclared wars in foreign nations. What would the founders of the Constitution think of this?

IVANO SAYS (CONT'D) I'M PROUD TO SAY THAT KRISTIAN GOT THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE COAST FROM THE BOOK"LA NOSTRA COSTA" (OUR COAST) BY YOURS TRULY . SEMPRE AVANTI.

Monday, November 21, 2011

FIGLIO DI SANTA CROCE (SON OF SANTA CRUZ) DON BINSACCA REMEMBERED





THE FOLLOWING REMEMBRANCE OF DON BINSACCA, SANTA CRUZ HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1955, WAS SENT TO ME BY CLASSMATE BRUCE HANSEN.




Don Binsacca was born in San Francisco, to Dorothy and Sam Binsacca.
He passed away peacefully and without pain, on the morning of November 10,
2011, from complications of Alzheimer's. He spent his last months under the
loving care of his family, his friends, his caregivers, and his devoted Hospice team. He never lost his famous sense of humor, and laughter often
rang from his room.

Don grew up in Santa Cruz, and then studied at U.C. Berkeley, and S.F.
State University, marrying Meredith Ludwig in 1961, and then beginning his
career in health. He retired in 1999 after thirty-five years at the Alameda County Health
Agency, spent most notably in developing research in and evaluation of
public health issues. Don and his beloved wife Meredith fortunate enough to celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary in June of this year, with close friends and
family.

He is survived by Meredith, their devoted children, Anya (Josh) and
Anthony (Lydia), and grandchildren Finley, Satchel, and Vanessa, as well as
his loving brother, Bob Binsacca (Lynn). Don will be remembered for his
wit, his generosity and his gentle kindness.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, December 3, at 1:30 p.m.,
at Mountain View cemetery in Oakland, at 5000 Piedmont Avenue. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be sent to Vitas Hospice, 365 Lennon Lane, Suite 140,
Walnut Creek, CA 94598.



DON BINSACCA (ON THE LEFT) WITH FELLOW SANTA CRUZ HIGH SCHOOL CLASSMATES-CLASS OF 1955, JERRY MUNGAI, FLORENCE BIANCO BELL AND IVAN COMELLI. (PHOTO TAKEN AT "NOSTRA COSTA DAYS" AT THE SWANTON BERRY FARM ON THE NORTH COAST OF SANTA CRUZ -2006)






ADDIO DON, UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN ACROSS "IL ULTIMO PONTE" (THE LAST BRIDGE).

Thursday, November 10, 2011

BARBRA SILVA WAGNER REMEMBERS WW II - PART 2

NOVEMBER 11, 2011 - VETERANS' DAY



WE HONOR THOSE WHO HONORED OUR FLAG BY DEFENDING OUR COUNTRY













Normandy Memorial












Guido Bianconi













Mike Demos


Guiliano Quilici


TAMBELLINI BOYS



























































FRANCIS AND ALVIN GREGORY















Attilio Dogliotti









PHOTOS ABOVE: NORTH COAST WW II VETERANS









BARBARA REMEMBERS:






Santa Cruz was surrounded (or at least it seemed to me) by military bases during the outbreak of WWII, Phelan Park on the cliffs, Camp McQuaide in Watsonville, Fort Ord and Monterey Naval Air Station in Monterey county, The Naval Air Station in Sunnyvale, The Presidio and Fort Mason in San Francisco, Treasure Island and Oakland - Alameda Naval Air Station across the bay. If you went to San Francisco, you were sure to see the bunkers all along the coast. They looked pretty scary to a little kid.

During the day we could hear the noise from the gunnery range at Fort Ord and the roar of planes taking off. I would look up and see the planes flying low overhead. How quickly I would run to find a place to hide --sometimes it was in the fields, other times it was in my parent’s garage. I still have those reoccurring nightmares of Japanese fighter planes flying right over our house on Western Drive (Cliff Way), the Japanese pilots staring out from their cockpits and seeing me through a window in the garage or just as I was making a break and running into the open to get to the house.

The sights and sounds of war can be terrifying to a little kid --the air-raid sirens, the blackouts, the rumbling of military vehicles on the road, etc. It so happened that my Dad was an Air-Raid Warden. When there was an air raid alert, he would quickly put on a hard hat and arm band; then grab a flash light and rush to the corner where he would stand until the all clear sound was given. Sometimes it seemed like an eternity.

During the day the troops and heavy tanks would go up and down the street on maneuvers --soldiers with guns over their shoulders, big guns being pulled by jeeps, etc.. Sometimes some of the solders would come to the house and get a drink of water from our garden hose. Being so young, it was all so confusing and I really did not know what was going on. I remember just taking off with my dog and running to my Grandparents house next door. Once there, I would go down to the cellar where they kept the wine barrels, cheese and Pilot Bread Crackers. At times I would even calm my nerves with a swig or two of the wine. It was especially scary, when all of this took place at night, and you'd peer out the window at all that darkness.

One day our neighbor, Mrs. Templeman, Ted Templeman’s (Harpers Bazzar) Grandmother, came running out of her house, screaming her lungs out. Her son, Ted, had been taken prisoner of war by the Japanese. Oh that poor woman, her other son Kenneth was serving in the Army and was stationed in Germany. (That was before they passed the law that only one son could serve in the military at the same time.) Ted was in the Navy in the Pacific when all this happened. This sweet woman was never the same after this and I can truly understand why. Her son came back, but there were others that unfortunately didn't. One of those, but from a different time, was Harvey Levine -- a happy go lucky young man, so full of life and fun. It l ended all to soon for him. I can still remember the funeral procession down Pacific Avenue --how sad, heart wrenching.

Getting back to WW II, I can recall gas rationing --you either had an ‘A’ sticker (normal driving –3 gallons per week) or a ‘B’ sticker (factory workers, traveling salesmen –8 gallons per week). And those OPA books of stamps that allowed you to buy 2 pair of shoes a year. Nylon was used for the war effort, so ladies wore silk stockings. If you got a run in them, you took them to the second floor of Leasks Department Store on Pacific Avenue to be mended. Or you just used leg make-up to draw a line down the back of your legs to look like seams, (Check it out girls. Make sure the line is straight.) Butter was rationed, so your Mom bought Oleomargarine with a little orange capsule that you mixed into the white gunk – phooey, I didn't like that. I was used to home made butter, but my Mom figured if everyone else had to do this we had to do it.



My sister learned to roll bandages at Laurel School. Then she would come home and teach me, so she could double her quota. I finally figured out that she was using me. All this for the war effort, of course.

There were good times and bad times, but the one thing that I remember most and learned from all this, was the camaraderie of the neighbors and people in general, All joined in, helping each other, sharing happiness, grief, sadness, food clothing or what ever was needed --what's mine is yours -- good feelings for bad times.

-Barbara Silva Wagner-


IVANO SAYS: Thanks Barbara. Many of your memories of WW II coincide with mine as recorded in my book “La Nostra Costa” (Our Coast), Chapter 3, “La Costa E La Guerra” (The Coast ant The War). It’s kind of ironic that your father was an Air Raid Warden. On pages 30-31, I write about my father, being almost arrested by an Air Raid Warden, during a Blackout. He was using a flashlight while feeding the rabbits in our backyard. That was a "no-no". Thanks again Barbara. As our parents did in WW II --Sempre Avanti.








Saturday, November 05, 2011

AMICO DI SANTA CROCE (FRIEND OF SANTA CRUZ) - WAYNE SHAFFER WINS AWARD

IVANO SAYS: I received the following message and news release from Rosa Radicchi in regards to Wayne's award:


Wow, Congratulations Waye!!! Check out the News Release below about Wayne Shaffer and the Good Neighbor Award. Also please check the link below to the article that was written in the "Realtor Magazine" publication. Thanks again to those who voted for Wayne!

http://realtormag.realtor.org/good-neighbor-awards/article/2011/11/good-neighbor-wayne-j-shaffer-love-your-neighbor



As some of you know, Wayne was also the recipient of the ICF Pope John the XXIII Award for 2011.

Lots of blessings,
rosa


PUBLIC AFFAIRS

RealtorÒ from Santa Cruz, Calif., Wins National Volunteer Award for Helping the Less Fortunate

WASHINGTON (November 2, 2011) – RealtorÒ Wayne J. Shaffer, a broker with Shaffer and Associates in Santa Cruz, Calif., is one of five winners chosen by the National Association of RealtorsÒ as REALTORÒ Magazine’s 2011 Good Neighbor Award winners. Shaffer was selected for his work with the poor and homeless through three different organizations that he helped establish.

“The Good Neighbor Awards program acknowledges RealtorsÒ who are dedicated to strengthening communities through volunteer work and helping those in need,” said NAR President Ron Phipps, broker-president of Phipps Realty in Warwick, R.I. “As a past Good Neighbor Award recipient, I know of the tremendous effort and time these winners devote to each of their causes. Wayne has been a tremendous leader within his community, working tirelessly to help those less fortunate.”

For more than three decades, Shaffer has devoted himself to helping the poor and homeless in Santa Cruz, Calif. In 1982 he cofounded the St. Francis Catholic Kitchen, a local soup kitchen which serves hot lunch to 190 people per day. Shaffer is now president of the board of directors and a frequent visitor. From there he went on to also cofound the Jesus Mary Joseph Home, a shelter for women and children.

In 1999 Shaffer met a pregnant woman who was living out of her car. He was inspired to help her and within a year he had founded the Siena House Maternity Home, an emergency shelter that provides care for women experiencing a crisis pregnancy. As cofounder and president, Shaffer has helped provide more than 350 women with pre- and post-natal care, counseling, baby care and lessons on nutrition, parenting and life skills.

“Women need a safe place to deal with their pregnancies,” said Shaffer. “They need a place that encourages a lifestyle that will be an improvement for their babies and themselves.” The shelter is housed in a former convent that accommodates up to 10 women during their pregnancies and for up to three months after delivery.

One of the women Shaffer has helped, Asmara Gebre, credits Siena House for putting her on a better path. She is currently attending the University of San Francisco’s nursing program and has earned a high school diploma and three associate’s degrees after giving birth to her daughter, now five. “The discipline I developed at Siena House, combined with the family atmosphere helped me learn what it meant to love and respect myself,” said Gebre. “It was the first time I was in an environment where people believed in me and encouraged me to pursue an education. Wayne is the father figure I never had. He didn’t know me but was willing to help.”

Siena House has an annual budget of $200,000. Women pay a house fee of $150 per month, and all other funding comes from donations and an annual dinner auction. Shaffer personally donates $10,000 per year.

Once admitted to the home, the women must follow a strict set of rules. They must remain sober and have no addictions. They must do household chores and take turns preparing meals for up to 15 people. In addition to attending counseling sessions and house meetings, they learn computer skills and are referred to other agencies for educational and vocational training.

“There are no strings attached to Wayne’s giving. He is a man who means what he says and does what he means,” said Siena House Director Sharron Rudell.

Meanwhile, the soup kitchen keeps going strong, serving 45,000 nutritious, free meals per year and spreading the word that positive change is possible. “When you help people get off the streets and into a safe place with a meal, this is where it all begins,” said Shaffer. “Someone will come up to you and thank you for something you did then years before and it makes you feel good to know you made a difference in that person’s life.”

Shaffer and the other four Good Neighbor Award winners will each receive a $10,000 grant for their charity and a $2,000 Lowe’s gift card, and will be profiled in the November-December issue of REALTORÒ Magazine. The recipients will receive their awards on Saturday, November 12, at the 2011 REALTORSÒ Conference & Expo in Anaheim, California.

“The Good Neighbor Awards honor Realtors® who are leaders in their community,” said Frank Sibley, REALTOR® Magazine publisher. “This year’s winners have literally saved lives, and inspire those around them to make positive changes in the world. We hope this award and the grant money will allow these Realtors® to expand their reach and help even more people.”

Celebrating its 12th year, the Good Neighbor Awards has been awarded annually since 2000 and is presented by NAR’s REALTORÒ Magazine. The Good Neighbor Awards is sponsored by Lowe’s and HouseLogic.

Nominees were judged on their personal contribution of time, as well as financial and material contributions to their cause. To be eligible, nominees had to be NAR members in good standing. More information about the Good Neighbor Awards winners is available at www.realtor.org/realtormag.



IVANO SAYS (CONT'D): Congratulations Wayne. I first met Wayne at his wife and Esther Frizza Wilson's bookstore in Santa Cruz (Agnus Dei). It was there that I had my first book signing event for "La Nostra Costa (Our Coast). Wayne was extremely supported of the event. Since that time, I have learned that he has done many other things, including giving support to my brother's family when needed. All of this has been done without and publicity and/or noteriaty. Thanks Wayne for all your good works. Sempre Avanti.

(BTW: I saw Wayne wondering thru the crowd at the Davenport-North Coast Reunon 2011. I didn't get a chance to say hello. Thanks for being there, Wayne. ivn0)

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

AMICO DELLA COSTA - FUMIE 'JIM' SPINETTI REMEMBERED


Fumie Spinetti (1920 - 2011)
Fumie "Jim" SpinettiJuly 22, 1920 - Oct. 29, 2011Resident of Santa CruzFumie Spinetti passed away at Dominican Hospital on Saturday, October 29. Fumie was born on July 22, 1920 in Santa Cruz, California. He was the son of Antonio Spinetti and Adelle Zoccoli. In his early years the family moved to the Springfield District near Moss Landing where his father farmed. Fumie attended elementary school in Springfield and later graduated from Watsonville High School in 1939. Shortly after graduation he went to work for Farmer's Mercantile and worked there for nineteen years. During this time he enlisted in the U.S. Naval Air Force and became an aviation machinist mate serving in the Western Theatre. Upon his honorable discharge from the Navy he married Betty Jordan of Livermore, California and moved to Watsonville, California. From this marriage they had three children: James, Thomas and Claudia. He later went to work for the Granite Construction Company as a heavy equipment mechanic retiring 25 years later as the Master Mechanic. He recently received his fifty-year membership gold watch from the Operating Engineers Union.In 1980 he married Dorothy Asmussen who was his high school classmate. Fumie was very active in the Italian Catholic Federation having served as the first president of the Watsonville branch for five and a half years. He was then elected to the Italian Catholic Federation's Central Council governing board and subsequently became a Member Emeritus. Fumie leaves his wife Dorothy and his three children: Jim and Tom Spinetti of Hollister and Claudia La Rue of Watsonville. He also leaves his stepson Chris Asmussen and his wife Linda, a sister Grace Hill, six grandchildren, six great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at Our Lady Help of Christians Valley Catholic Church, 2401 East Lake Ave., Watsonville, CA on Thursday November 3 at 10:00 am. A vigil and recital of the holy Rosary will be held at Benito Azzaro Pacific Gardens Chapel, 1050 Cayuga St., Santa Cruz on Wednesday evening at 7:00 pm. A visitation will be held at Pacific Gardens Chapel on Wednesday from 3:00 pm until service time. Interment will be in Valley Catholic Cemetery immediately following the funeral mass.Contributions in his memory can be made to the Santa Cruz Italian Catholic Federation, Branch #21, 125 Toledo Street, Santa Cruz, California, 95060 or you can make a donation to the charity of choice.
Published in Santa Cruz Sentinel on November 1, 2011

IVANO SAYS: ADDIO JIM, UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN ACROSS 'IL ULTIMO PONTE.

Sunday, October 30, 2011

HAPPY HALLOWEEN 2011 EVERYBODY

IVANO SAYS: HOPE YOU ALL HAVE A REAL 'SPOOKY' ONE AT THAT. IT'S GOING TO GET REAL SCARY OUT THERE. MAKE SURE YOU TAKE YOUR 'BRAVE PILLS' BEFORE GOING OUT. THEM ITALIAN GHOSTS DON'T FOOL AROUND. SEMPRE AVANTI

Friday, October 07, 2011

LaNORMA, AL AND GINO SEND US PHOTOS OF THE SCARONIS


PHOTO: HERB SCARONI



IVANO SAYS: GINO CAMPIONI SENDS US A STORY ABOUT HERB SCARONI (NOT RELATED TO THE SCARONI'S IN THE PHOTO (BELOW)



It was the cold war era at a time when all transmitting devices were to be silenced in case of emergency. All radio stations, including amateur radio were mandated to have some sort of device which would alert of required shut-downs. Someone placed a plan and schematic diagram in a Ham radio magazine, showing how a simple tube type radio could be modified so that it could be used normally in the listening mode, or with the switch set to the alarm mode,the radio would be silent until the local standard broadcast station went off the air. When the broadcasting stopped, the radio would give a loud squawk! Amateurs were then to keep radio
silence until the broadcasting resumed and the alarm device went silent again.

In the Santa Cruz Radio Club we had many members, and on most evenings there would be a gathering of any number between two and thirty friends, each taking a turn at talking for a few minutes.(round table contacts) Herb was one of the most talkative, and frequently took a bit more time than the rest of the group.

Someone decided to play a trick on good ol’ Herb, and by talking over the top of him while he was transmitting, told the rest of us to keep silence after he relinquished the frequency. (it may have been me, but I don’t remember for sure.)

Herb called others of the group with no response. Finally, after about 15 minutes, someone came on with, “Herb, didn’t you hear the signal to stop transmitting? Boy, you will be in big trouble now!”

Most of the members in the group continued in that line of harassment, until we got tired of it, and told Herb it was just a joke. He took it very nicely, as I remember, but it actually had him worried.

So there is my ineptly written report. There is a home address for Herb on QRZ.com and it can be found using his current radio call-sign of AI6D.

Saluti e sempre avanti. Gino






Ivano:

Sending you a foto that was given to me by Sue Girard (she found you on the Facebook).

She attended the reunion and came all the way by herself from Nipomo ( San Luis Obispo area).

I took the foto of all her family with Scaroni’s and Al made it into just the Scaronis. He did a great job. Most people will just know the Scaronis and not Sue’s family but in our archives it will be nice to have her family as well. She thinks this was taken in late 1920’s (way before her time!).

If you post this, it will be interesting to see how many people remember this great family. They were certainly very unique and I, for one, sure do miss them! You might post both fotos – one with Sue’s Family intact. Anyway let me know what you think – I know you have good memories of these people.

The summary is very brief – so much more can be said. I know that Ted Templeton (of Harpers Bizarre singing group spent all his summers at the Dairy), etc. etc.

Sempre Avanti. LaNorma

IVANO SAYS: Thanks LaNorma and Al. I also posted the one photo with Al's brief explanation on the Davenport North Coast Facebook Page. I think I met Sue briefly at the Reunion. She came up to me and showed me copies of the above photo(s). We but them with our Historical Photos display. Thank you, Sue. I wish I would have more time to spend with you. Thank you for coming all that and attending our Reunion.



FOR A RELATED SCARONI FAMILY ARTICLE ON THIS BLOG, 'CLICCA': http://nostra-costa.blogspot.com/2007/06/lanorma-remembers-scaronis.html



Sunday, September 25, 2011

DAVENPORT-NORTH COAST REUNION 2011 A GREAT SUCCESS

Photo below: Joanne Gemignani Swaney with husband Jan; daughter Jenna with fiancee Kent. Lido Gemignani and his two children are starring over the "shavola.



Dino Gemignani and family: Wife Sheila, daughters Angela and Corrina.





























































































IVANO SAYS: THE DAVENPORT NORTH COAST REUNION 2011 was a great success. Over 230 people attended. I want to thank everyone who was in attendance. Your the reason it was such a great success. Beautiful sunny day, great food and great friends = GREAT SUCCESS.



I realize that some of you do not do Facebook --so I have posted some sample photos taken at the event. Many more photos have been posted (and are still being posted) on the Davenport North Coast 2011 Facebook page.



Photo third from top. The "Old Rancere" presenting Alverda Orlando with her Life Achievement Award for preserving and promulgating Davenport North Coast History. Her two beautiful daughters stand at her side.


Fourth Photo from the top: Rosa Radicchi talking to a Greogory (not sure of first name.)




Fifth Photo from the top: Three "old" school mates: Marvin Del Chiaro, Ivan(0) Comelli and Jerry Mungai.



Sixth Photo from the top: Welcoming Committee: Tina, LaNorma, Steve and the "Old Rancere".



Bottom Photo: The "Old Rancere" and Mary Silva Tambellini.














Kristian says: Thanks Again for being there, everybody.





Saturday, September 10, 2011

BARBARA SILVA WAGNER REMEMBERS WW II........

IVANO SAYS: Some time ago I spoke with Barbara via telephone. Barbara, known back then as Barbara Silva , and I go back a long way. In fact all the way back to our Laurel School days. In our conversation we discussed some of her memories re: WW II. I suggested to her that she write them down and send them to me. She finally did, and now that we are at the ten year anniversary of 9/11, I thought it most appropriate to publish them on the LNostra-Costa Blog. These are Barbara's memories of another War, however; one can imagine that our servicemen and there families are experiencing the same happenings. as described by Barbara:

Well, guess I'd best start w/Laurel School kindergarten. I don't remember if you were there or did you start 1st grade at Laurel? Anyway, I remember that I would go to Pacific Cleaners on Pacific Ave., next to Sam Wo Laundry after school to wait for my Mom to get off work. While waiting, I saw and talked to a lot of the servicemen when they came into the cleaners to get their uniforms pressed. Some were missing limbs, others had their heads bandaged. They were all young and missed their families and home. A lot of them were from the mid west and had never seen an ocean before. They told stories of the corn growing so high, and how they worked the wheat fields. I knew that their surroundings were different from mine, but I soon realized that the people they were talking about were the same, caring individuals that I knew here.
Some had small children and missed them terribly. I could tell this by the way they talked with tears in their eyes. As young as I was, it hurt me and I was deeply touched.

On one occasion, we were on our way to Monterey for the Portuguese celebration. My Dad was driving down Main St. in Watsonville. There, in front of St. Patrick's Church, we spotted a soldier hitch-hiking. Dad stopped to give him a ride. Being a Sunday, the soldier was on week-end pass from Fort Ord, He sat in the back with my sister and myself and started to tell us about himself. He said that he had a little girl, about my age, and how he really missed her; how she wore a bow in her hair like mine. Before we knew it we were at the gate at Fort Ord. The soldier offered to pay my Dad for the ride and gas. Of course, my Parents said no. In a way, it was their way of thanking him for his service to our Country. They expressed their pleasure in visiting with him. I remember those words so vividly. They stuck in my mind, even to this day, even though at that age, I didn't know completely what it was all about.

What happened next left my Mother in tears. The young soldier turned around, bent over where I was sitting, took the propeller insignia off his uniform and pinned it on the bow in my hair. He kissed my head, said thank you so much and walked off ... I never knew his name ... but I do remember his smile and the slight smell of liquor on his breath, to help him ease the pain of what he and others were going through. God bless him where ever he may be ...

I will send another short story regarding the war and troops on Western Drive and Santa Cruz in general if it's OK. Don't want to bore you or tell too long of a tale, LOL Take care, Barb

IVANO SAYS (CONT'D). Thanks Barbara: We'll be looking forward to your next installment, right her on the LNostra-Costa Blog. These kind of personal memories are never a bore and remind us all that we should never forget our servicemen, especially during this time of remembrance.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

HISTORIC PHOTO OF THE RODONI FAMILY

THE RODONI FAMILY ON THE RODONI RANCH, C. 1946. (Dante, Grandma Gina in the car, Mario seated on your left, then Jeannie, then Elio ['Bebo'] and the beautiful Andreina.)


IVANO SAYS: The above photo was posted by Mario and Donna Rodoni's daughter Suzy Rodoni-Silverberg, on the'Davenport North Coast Reunion 2011' Facebook Page:

www.facebook.com/#1/groups/214420118580618/ (Actually, it looks like this link takes you to my FB page. You can 'clicca' on the link provided there. Or go to your Facebook Page and search for 'Davenport North Coast Reunion 2011'. )

I realize that some of you do not do Facebook, therefore; I published the photo on this Blog. As I write in my book (Pgs. 201-205), the Rodoni Family played a significant part in the La Nostra Costa Story. Thanks Suzie for sharing.



REMEMBER: MANY HISTORIC PHOTOS OF DAVENPORT AND THE NORTH COAST WILL BE ON DISPLAY ON SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, AT OUR REUNION BBQ AT HARVEY WEST PARK, SANTA CRUZ. THERE IS STILL TIME TO ORDER TICKETS. DEADLINE FOR ORDERING TICKETS. SEPT 7. IF YOU NEED FURTHER INFORMATION CALL

LaNORMA AT 831-438-8316, OR ROSA AT 831-460-0545. OR "CLICCA":

http://nostra-costa.blogspot.com/2011/04/davenport-coast-road-committee-sets.html

See you all at the Reunion BBQ. Sempre Avanti. Ivano




































Tuesday, July 26, 2011

FIGLIO DI FIGLI DELLA COSTA JOSEPH "JOEY' FREEMAN-DELLA MORA - 'RANCERE' - REMEMBERANCE



Joseph Freeman-Dellamora (1992-2011)
JOSEPH "JOEY" UEL FREEMAN-DELLAMORA
BORN: Aug. 12, 1992
DIED: July 21, 2011
OCCUPATION: Farmer
EDUCATION: Santa Cruz High School, class of 2011
SURVIVORS: Mother, Anne Freeman Dellamora of Sandy, Utah; father, Steve Dellamora of Scotts Valley; sisters Tara Rigby of Shelton, Wash., and Ali Richardson of Chowchilla.


Joey, our beloved son, brother, nephew, uncle; cousin and friend passed away in a tragic accident at his family brussels sprout farm on July 21, 2011. He was 18 years old and had just graduated from high school, the third generation of his family to graduate from Santa Cruz High School. He had dreamed, and worked toward, becoming a farmer like his dad Steve since the day that any of us can remember. Joey was a fourth generation Italian American Santa Cruz coastal farmer. He leaves behind his mom Anne Freeman DellaMora of Sandy, Utah; his dad Steve DellaMora of Scotts Valley, CA; his sister Tara Rigby and her family [Lance, Tabitha and Rebekah] of Shelton, Washington; his sister Ali Richardson and her family [Charlie, Reese and Grace] of Chowchilla, CA; his Aunt Jill Dellamora Grossi and her family Billy, [Bianca, Bridget, and Sofia]; his Uncle Dan and Aunt Kathy Roberts of Murphys, CA; and cousins Lee and Eiva Freeman of Phoenix, AZ; cousin Faralyn Roberts and her family of Stockton, CA; Uncle Bob Shaefer of San Jose, CA; Uncle Mike and Aunt Shirley Shaefer of Sonora, CA; and Aunt Valerie Northrop of Jamestown, CA; Aunt and Uncle Patty and Jess Nelson, of Soquel,CA; godparents Kathy and Fred Hibberd of Santa Cruz, CA; Velda DellaMora-Dixon, Tara and Ali's mom, of Chowchilla, CA; and too many cousins to name. Joey was deeply loved by many not the least of whom is his best friend Dominic Boegel, his friends Robby Pappas, Eric Mullis, Alex Demos, Ben Damon, Peter Miller, Eli Ledworth, Cole Collins, Sean Forbes, Jonathon and Ian Heald, Logan Banks, Jaclyn Brosio, Shane Brosio, Michael Gangloff and many others and we apologize for not naming all of you-your friendship meant so much to Joey and his family really wants to acknowledge how much it means to them as well. He left behind his beloved dogs Buster and Roscoe. His Uncle Dennis Freeman passed away on the farm just a year ago. He was also predeceased by his grandparents Uel and Elvena Freeman, Joseph DellaMora and Henrietta Lowe. As a young boy, Joey participated in Cub scouts, t-ball, baseball, soccer where he broke his foot, and football. Joey tried all of this but his true callings were hunting, farming, friends and family. Joey loved to hunt and fish, ride motorcycles, loved his animals, he loved farming and he especially loved the ranch. We loved his big mischievous grin, his twinkling eyes, his laugh, his willingness to hang out with friends and family, old and young. Joey and Dominic were very excited about a hunting trip they had planned for this past weekend to Carri Stanley's ranch, Los Ninos, in King's Canyon, to go pig hunting. Joey and Dominic lived on the ranch. Joey and Steve just donated a Farmall 300 tractor to the Farm Bureau museum at the Santa Cruz County fairgrounds. The tractor has been at the farm since 1949.

In the last year, we all saw Joey blossoming into the man we were so delighted to see he was becoming: including one who was ready to step up and make his dream of becoming a farmer a reality. Last year, during the rains, his dad credits him and his best pal Dominic with saving the crops: They spent weeks working dawn until well after dark hauling in the sprouts. It was a point of contention between Joey's sisters and dad that he was out of school for that period of time. Now we're all glad that he got to truly farm and partner with his dad for a season.

His dad remembers taking Joey to the first game of the World Series last year and how Joey just had to have a Tim Lincecum jersey. Now he will be buried in it.

The family would especially like to thank Doug Banks who risked his own life to rescue Joey. We will be forever grateful. We're all sorry the outcome was not different but want to express our heartfelt appreciation for the valiant efforts of those, including Doug, who worked desperately to save his life.

It is hard to write about his life-it was just ending for him as a child and just beginning as an adult. There were so many more memories to be made with him. We will keep him in our hearts forever and meet him when we meet our heavenly Father. Joey you leave a hole in our hearts. Someday we will laugh again as you would have wanted and we will be forever changed for the better for you having been a part of our lives. Our lives will be forever altered for having lost you far too soon.

In Joey's honor, please remember life is fragile and hold your loved ones close.

There will be viewing for family and friends on Thursday, July 28, from 4 to 8 pm, at Santa Cruz Memorial Chapel, 1927 Ocean Street, Santa Cruz. Services will be held on Friday, July 29, at 11 am, High Street Community Church, 850 High Street, Santa Cruz, 426-0207. A celebration of Joey's life and our gratefulness that we got to share it with him, will immediately follow the service. The reception will be held at the DellaMora ranch, 5511 Coast Road, Santa Cruz. Please wear comfortable shoes and clothes to the reception. His internment will be private and held on Saturday, July 30.

Joey's family wishes to thank those that have called, emailed, sent food and their condolences. We are deeply touched and comforted. Donations in Joey's memory may be made to Agri-culture 141 Monte Vista Ave., Watsonville, CA 95076 [http://www.agri-culture.us/support/make-donation] or the California Waterfowl Association 4630 Northgate Boulevard, Ste 150, Sacramento, CA 95834 https://www.signup4.net/public/ap.aspx?EID=MEMO11E&OID=130.

Published in Santa Cruz Sentinel on July 26, 2011

Saturday, July 16, 2011

THE NOSTRA COSTA STORY CONTINUES - RYAN ROUBAL

Ryan Roubal (right) one of the recipients of Santa Cruz High School Class of 1954 Scholarship Award
is pictured with his Grandfather
Giovanni Primo (John) Comelli (on his
immediate right), his Great Uncle Ivano Franco Comelli and his cousin
Matthew Reid (standing on the left).
Ryan and Matthew's Great-Great Aunt, Lina Bressani Gemignani stands in front. Photo taken at Ryan and Matthew's recent graduation party.
Matthew graduated from Harbor High; Ryan from Santa Cruz High.



Hailey Sims and Ryan Roubal, 2011 Santa Cruz High grads and recipients of SCHS Class of 1954 scholarships, were luncheon guests of local Class of '54 members on June 29 at Chaminade.
Ryan was accompanied by grandmother, Donna (Moro) Comelli, and Hailey was accompanied by her stepmother, Monique Kremer. Ryan plans to attend San Jose State University and Hailey plans to attend UC-Berkeley.
They were selected by the Santa Cruz High Alumni Association scholarship committee.
To receive a Class of '54 scholarship, a student must have had a parent or grandparent who graduated from SCHS. Ryan, incidentally, is a grandnephew of Ivan Comelli, SCHS Class of 1955.


*******

IVANO SAYS: I received the above information and photo from Len Klempnauer, SCHS GradClass of 1954. Ryan and Matthew are the Great-Grandsons of Bronco and Valentina Comelli and Lou and Enis Moro. Congratulations Ryan and Haily and a great big Sempre Avanti to all the Grads.

Saturday, July 02, 2011

THE SPIRT OF THE DAVENPORT DESTROYER LIVES ON

DAVENPORT DESTROYER'S GREAT GRANDSON HITTING HIS HOME RUN.














IVANO SAYS: AS MANY OF YOU KNOW: I devoted a whole chapter in my book on Pacific Coast League Hall of Famer, Joe (Pino) Brovia - The Davenport Destroyer. Joe grew up in Newtown, Davenport-CA. and started to play baseball on 1st Street (Newtown). From there his highly successful career included playing for the San Francisco Seals, Portland Beavers, Oakland Oaks and Sacramento Solons. He even had a stint with Cincinnati Reds of the American League. Joe was elected to the the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame in 2005. Now it appears that the spirit of Joe Brovia lives on in his Great Grandson, Levi Snowden. I received the following information from proud Great-Grandma Cathy Brovia.

Hi Ivano,

I thought maybe some of your readers would like to hear about the Davenport Sluggers great grandson Levi Snowden...

Levi is 8, going on 9, and loves and breathes baseball. He plays for the Kalawai Pinto team. in Kauai, and was selected to play in the ALL STAR TOURNAMENT IN OAHU JUNE 11, 12....

I sent him an e-mail and told him I was praying that he would hit a home run for grandpa in the tournament. His father (Matt) wrote back, and told me he would tell me all about what happened in the game when he got back from Oahu...

An e-mail I received reads......

Dear Grandma Cathy,

Your prayers were answered! In the bottom of the last inning with the score tied and one out, LEVI hit your home run (photos above), and a walk after that.. It was the highlight of the tournament as it was against the TOP SEATED TEAM. Levi's team went 5-0 and Levi played solid defense and batted over 500. Grandpa must have said something to him after the swing and miss... Thank you for your encouragement and support. It was a wonderful weekend..Sending lots of love, Matthew...

An e-mail I received this morning tells me Levi has been hitting left handed as well and looks to be comfortable from that side of the plate. (Joe Brovia was a notorious left handed pull hitter.)

DON'T YOU THINK THIS A CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK???? I know Joe would be so happy to have him follow in his foot steps...

It is so sad that all my grand children and great grand children live so far from me. Idaho, California, and Hawaii....They grow up, and you don't get to watch them.

Levi also has a sweet sister called Selah, she is going on 4, and is a pistol when it comes to singing and baking, they tell me.....


Ivano, I know how much you love bragging about your grandson, so I thought I would let you know,,,,, I have a little to brag about too...!!!

Sempre avanti.... Cathy

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

REMEMBERING RITA DEL PIERO STRINGARI -FIGLIA DEL FRIULI

IVANO SAYS: The above photo (mostly Furlans) was taken on the Del Piero Ranch in Watsonville, circa 1948 at Rita's sister's (Aurora) wedding. Unfortunatly, Rita does not appear in the photo, however, members of the Del Piero and Comelli famlies do.

THE BELOW REMEMBRANCE OF RITA APPEARED IN THE SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL.

Rita was the daughter of Timo and Caterina Del Piero who were very close family friends to my parents Valentina and Gervasio (Bronco) Comelli. The Del Piero's who were originally from Nimis, Udine Italy (same birth place as my parents)owned and Apple Orchard in Watsonville near Pinto Lake. Timo originally began his farming career on the North Coast of Santa Cruz, CA ('su per la costa'). ADDIO RITA - UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN - ACROSS 'IL ULTIMO PONTE'.


***

With profound loss, we share with you the passing of Rita Del Piero Stringari. Rita was a passionate advocate for literacy and the language arts. For over sixty years she was a beloved teacher who inspired and enriched generations of families in the Pajaro Valley. Rita's childhood experience as an immigrant struggling with two languages gave her a personal perspective and a deep concern for the bilingual children she taught. She believed in the potential for success in every child and felt that learning to read and write well was the basis for achieving that success. Rita's passion for books and her dedication to the children of this Valley have had a lasting effect on the community.

Rita was born in the village of Nimis, Udine, in northeastern Italy, the first child of Caterina Comelli and Timoleone Del Piero. In 1921, still in her mother's arms, she immigrated to the United States through Ellis Island. She traveled by land across country to join her father, Timo, in Davenport, CA where he had settled the previous year. In time, her sister, Aurora, and brother, Richard, were born and the family moved to Castroville and then to Moss Landing and Watsonville where they farmed coastal acreage.

Rita attended Moss Landing School, Monterey High School and Hartnell College. In 1942 she graduated with an elementary teaching credential from San Jose State University and married Lawrence S. Stringari, a graduate of the University of Santa Clara, and a resident of Colorado. After the war ended, they moved with their children, Lorita and Tim, to Watsonville to be near family.

In the late 1940's, Rita began as a teacher at Moss Landing School and Pajaro Union Elementary School. She taught the primary grades and art [for all levels] until she retired in 1985. Following retirement, Rita continued to teach as a "preferred' substitute in part time and long term assignments and as a volunteer at T.S. McQuiddy School until 2008.

In 1976 Rita and a small group of professional educators founded the Asilomar Regional Reading Conference [ARRC] for the Santa Cruz, Monterey, and surrounding counties. The conference annually invited vendors and authors of children's literature to provide educators from local counties a weekend of ideas and speakers on language arts teaching materials. She continuously served on the board and as the Coordinator for Vendors through the final conference held in 2009.

The T.S. McQuiddy Elementary School teachers and parents honored Rita by naming the school library in her honor in 2006. Rita was appointed to the Watsonville City Council Library Board of Trustees and served as Board President the year that the newly constructed Watsonville Library was dedicated. She was a member of the Santa Cruz County Reading Association for almost forty years, served as President for two years, received the Gold Medal honor as Member of the Year. She was honored again in 2010 for her years of service.

Other organizations in which Rita was a long term active member include American Association of University Women, Y.L.I, Watsonville Women's Club, International Reading Association, California Reading Association, Pajaro Valley Arts Council, Delta Kappa Gamma.

Rita Del Piero Stringari is survived with loving memories by her family: Lorita Winfield [daughter] of Scottsdale, Az; Tim [son] and Kay Stringari of Truckee; Aurora [sister] and Clyde Mitchell of San Mateo; Richard [brother] Del Piero of Watsonville. She will be dearly missed by her nieces and nephews and their families: Kathy and Michael Ladra, Dr. Matthew Ladra, Jeff Ladra, Michael Mitchell, Marc and Tina Del Piero, Paul Del Piero, John Del Piero, Dr. Eric and Teresa Del Piero, Kris Del Piero. She has the love of her Winfield step grandchildren and step great grandchildren, the Virgil and Barbara Stringari Family, the Ileene Ericson Family and Rita's Italian cousins, the Comellis and Del Pieros of Nimis, Italy.A Memorial Mass will be held at Our Lady Help of Christians Church [The Valley Church] 2401 East Lake Avenue, Watsonville, California, 95076 on Saturday, July 9, 2011, at 2:15 pm. A reception will follow at the Church Community Hall for Rita's family, friends and former students. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Rita's memory to: The Cabrillo College Foundation, [memo: The AAUW Watsonville Branch Endowed Scholarship Fund] 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos CA 95003; Hospice of Santa Cruz County, 940 Disc Drive, Scotts Valley, CA 95066; or to the Watsonville City Library.

Published in Santa Cruz Sentinel on June 29, 2011

Friday, May 20, 2011

FIRST DAVENPORT -NORTH COAST REUNION - 1977




IVANO SAYS: THE ABOVE NEWSPAPER CLIPPING RE: THE FIRST DAVENPORT-COAST ROAD REUNION WAS SENT TO ME BY 'LaNORMA'. IT APPEARS THAT HER PARENTS DANTE AND DIANA DINELLI SAVED IT FOR ALL OF US TO SAVOR. 'CLICCA' ON THE ABOVE ARTICLE TO ENLARGE FOR YOUR VIEWING PLEASURE.


WHAT: FIRST DAVENPORT- NORTH COAST REUNION


WHEN: AUGUST 1977


WHERE: SOCIAL HALL - CAPITOLA - ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH


WHO: 325+ OLDTIME AND PRESENT DAY RESIDENTS OF DAVENPORT AND THE NORTH COASTAL AREA OF SANTA CRUZ, CA.


COMMITTE:


LOUIE MAZZEI, CHAIRMAN


FRED MORO


RAY TAMBELLINI


ANN (PAPA) PERKINS


GENE TERRINI


ELMER MORELLI


PETE PIANAVILLA


TOMMY DIAZ


DATE OF NEXT REUNION: SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011, HARVEY WEST PARK, SANTA CRUZ, CA. AND YES, SEMPRE AVANTI CON LA HISTORIA DELLA COSTA.


BREAKING NEWS: 'DAVENPORT NORTH COAST REUNION 2011' NOW ON FACEBOOK














Posted by Picasa

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

DAVENPORT-COAST ROAD COMMITTEE SETS DATE FOR REUNION BBQ-SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

BREAKING NEWS: YOUR MASTERS OF CERAMONIES FOR THIS YEARS DAVENPORT
NORTH COAST BBQ WILL BE:
LaNORMA (NORMA DINELLI WILSON) AND
IN HIS 'GUISE' AS THE "OLD RANCERE",
IVANO COMELLI. LaNORMA IS THE GOOD LOOKING ONE ON THE LEFT.
REMEMBER DEADLINE FOR ORDERING
TICKETS IS SEPT 7, 2011. SCROLL DOWN THE
PAGE FOR ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED TO ORDER TICKETS.










KEEP SCROLLING DOWN TO VIEW
MOST RECENT INFORMATON(WITH MAIL IN COUPON) FOR THIS HISTORIC EVENT.
Salute a Tutti!







DATE: SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


LOCATION: EVERGREEN PICNIC AREA



HARVEY WEST PARK IN SANTA CRUZ, CA.


TIME: 11:30 AM TO 4:00 PM



(BBQ: 12:30 PM TO 3;00 PM)
MENU: Appetizer: Sauage BBQ Lunch: Tri-tip or Chicken and beans, vegetable stir-fry, salad & garlic bread. Hot dogs availble for Children. Dessert: Strawberry Shortcake

BEVERAGES: Lemonade and water w/meal. Beer, wine and soda will also be available.


ALSO YOU ARE WELCOME TO BRING YOUR OWN ETHNIC FOOD. HOPEFULLY, YOU WILL FEEL FREE TO SHARE.


PRICE: Adults: $20.00 Children under 12 - $5:00


(After expenses, proceeds will be donated towards projects that benefit the Davenport Community)


Pre-ordered tickets will be available at the event (tickets will not be mailed).



DEADLINE FOR ORDERING TICKETS: SEPT 7, 2011



PHONE NUMBERS TO CALL FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:


ROSA RADICCHI: 831-460-0545 NORMA DINELLI WILSON: 831-438-8316


TINA OLIMPIO CUTTER: 831-566-9082

-OR-


email: davenport_nc_reunion@yahoo.com


SPECIAL GUEST TO BE HONORED: ALVERDA ORLANDO


FOR HER OUTSTANDING SERVICE PRESERVING AND PROMULGATING DAVENPORT-NORTH COAST HISTORY.


____________________________________________________________


COPY AND MAIL TO D.C.R.R., P.O. BOX 234, DAVENPORT, CA 95017-0234

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: D.C.R.R


Total Adults___Total Children ___Total enclosed _____






Name _____________________




Phone_______________



E-mail: __________________ Confirmation request: e-mail __ tp #:__ (check one)






GUEST NAMES:_______________________________________________________




____ I/we are unable to attend. Enclosed is my/our donation.




************************************************************************



'DAVENPORT NORTH COAST REUNION 2011' NOW ON FACEBOOK.

Sunday, April 03, 2011

REMEMBERING 'FIGLIA DEL FRIULI' EVELINA CANTARUTTI

TOGETHER AGAIN - ACROSS 'IL ULTIMO PONTE'
(Photo: Evelina on the left, and Valentina, c. 1946)

1912-2011 - Evelina Cantarutti, nee Venturini, was born in Rodeano Basso, a small town in the Friuli Region of Northeastern Italy. Her childhood and upbringing there would forever shape her life, values and view of the world. Evelina passed away peacefully the morning of March 28, 2011 at Nazareth House in San Rafael, California.


Evelina met her husband, Guido, in the nearby town of Cisterna. The couple married in 1931. Their first son, Carino (Reno), was born in Cisterna shortly thereafter.

In 1935, Evelina with her infant son, immigrated to America where they rejoined Guido, who had previously immigrated to the North Coast of Santa Cruz, near Davenport, CA. There they were befriended by Gervasio (Bronco) and Valentina Comelli, who had also immigrated to America from Friuli. The two families formed bonds that would last a life time.


Initially, Guido made his living working as a rancere on the Venturini Ranch, su per la costa.The newly immigrated family lived in a ‘wind blown shack’ located on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, seven miles north of Davenport. (Evelina would often say in Italian, “We had nothing then. Nothing. No money,no property. All we had was the clothes on our back and il vento (the wind)in our faces.") During this period there second son, Lido was born. In 1947, a daughter, Norma, was born to them. This was after they had relocated to Richmond, California. (Thus,Norma didn't get to experience life in the 'windblown shack' su per la costa)


Evelina undertook her life in the new world and with her growing family with characteristic hard work and determination –trying to learn the language, always making new friends and ever maintaining her ties, contacts and support with all of the family relatives in Italy. This included two brothers and sisters and many other relatives. For many years, Evelina and Guido with their family, lived in Richmond, CA, then moved in the early fifties to the home she loved so much in El Cerrito. Evelina continued to live there following the death of her beloved husband, Guido, in 1971, and until moving into Nazareth House eight years ago.


Evelina lived a long and full life and cherished it all: the family, the friendships, the hard work, Italy, her town of Rodeano Basso, America, Davenport,Santa Cruz, Richmond, El Cerrito and San Rafael. She especially loved and was proud of all her grandchildren; Dino, Steven and Gary Cantarutti(parents Franca and Reno); Jeffrey and Perry Cantarutti (parnts Mary Brent and Lido); and Anne Marie van Amson and Lisa Beebout(parents Norma and Randy Reiter) plus six great grandchildren! Her children were all around her as she left this world, and wish to take this opportunity to thank everyone who loved and helped her, especially the clergy, the medical staff and caregivers at Nazarath House. Evelina’s family is very grateful.



-------


IVANO SAYS: The Rosary was held Wednesday evening (3-30-2011) at Monte’s Chapel of the Hills, San Anselmo CA. The Funeral Mass was celebrated the next day at Nazareth House, 245 Nova Albion Way, San Rafael, CA 94903. In lieu of flowers The family prefers contributions to Nazareth House, or a charity of one’s choice.



ADDIO EVELINA. UNTIL WE ME AGAIN “ACROSS IL ULTIMO PONTE”.

Friday, April 01, 2011

REMEMBERING 'FIGLIA DELLA COSTA' - NADINE (FAMBRINI) SCARGILL

Nadine Marie (Fambrini) Scargill On Friday, March 25, Nadine Marie [Fambrini] Scargill passed from this world after a brief battle with cancer at the age of 72. A native of Santa Cruz, Nadine was born on December 16, 1938 where she lived on the north coast for 40 years before retiring with her husband, David, to Scotts Valley, Ca. She graduated from Holy Cross High in 1956 and then married David, her high school sweetheart and together raised a family. She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother and friend. Every day of Nadine's life was spent taking care of her family, friends, and neighbors. She was admired by many for her love of life and was never without a nurturing moment or willingness to help. Nadine was an active volunteer at Vista Del Lago, which she and David have called home since 1995. Nadine was an active member of YLI for over 50 years and supported numerous local charities. She is preceded in death by her parents John and Margaret Fambrini, Uncle Fred Dimeo, Aunt Theresa Modena, Aunt Etta Finley, Uncle's Alfred and Marvin Fambrini. Nadine is survived by her loving husband of 54 years David Scargill of Scotts Valley, son Raymond Scargill and daughter-in-law Tish Scargill of Scotts Valley, son Jeffery Scargill of Santa Cruz, daughter Elaine Delgado of Scotts Valley, daughter Catherine Bruce and son-in-law Jacob Bruce of Santa Cruz. Nadine has nine grandchildren: Lindsey, Jennifer, Kaleena, Marco, John, Graeme, Christina, Jordan, and Sean and her treasured four great-grandchildren: Trajan, Auden, Hamish and Questen. She is also survived by her brother, Raymond and wife Zelma Fambrini of Santa Cruz, her nephews John, Steve and Brian Fambrini of Santa Cruz, her Uncle Charles Modena of Santa Cruz and numerous other family members. Viewing will be held Thursday March 31 from 4pm-7pm, followed by a rosary at 7pm, at Santa Cruz Memorial Oakwood Chapel 3301 Paul Sweet Road, Santa Cruz. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Friday April 1, 2011, 11am, at Holy Cross Church, 126 High Street in Santa Cruz. Interment will be held immediately after the mass at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in Santa Cruz. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Nadine's name to "Monterey Bay Horsemanship and Therapeutic Center" or St. John's Catholic Church in Felton, Ca Published in Santa Cruz Sentinel on March 30, 2011 ---------------- IVANO SAYS: IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE LITTLE GIRL I PLAYED WITH IN THE OLD BARN ON THE GULCH RANCH 'SU PER LA COSTA' NO SO LONG AGO. ADDIO, NADINE, UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN ACROSS 'IL ULTIMO PONTE'

Sunday, March 27, 2011

THE RIVER RISES AGAIN - BY DON MILLER, EDITOR SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL

Don Miller: Santa Cruz County disasters -- The river rises again - It's not a dream. It never is. Thursday was that kind of day. It had been raining off and on for seemingly weeks, but the way it was falling, falling that morning reminded me of so many other moments in time. And it probably brought unwelcome memories to lots of other folks who have been around Santa Cruz County for more than a decade or so. Because one of our barely repressed secrets is that in an area blessed with so much beauty -- we're a mecca for natural disasters. That's a little difficult to fathom a little more than two weeks after the apocalypse in Japan, but here at the Sentinel the river of experience and memory runs deep. Our most recent rain and wind storms culminated in flooding that ruined manufactured homes in a Capitola park, sent water and mud into businesses in Capitola Village, toppled trees into homes, caused epic landslides and mud ooze, and forced homeowners to evacuate along the surging and cresting San Lorenzo River on the stretch between Felton and Santa Cruz. Less than two weeks before, a tsunami surged through the Santa Cruz boat harbor, causing more than $26 million in damages and destroying or sinking 10 boats. And even recent emigres to Santa Cruz County can talk with some authority about the '89 earthquake, which killed six people and pretty much destroyed downtown Santa Cruz and Watsonville along with 700 homes countywide. Damages. In recent years, we've also endured a series of wildfires that have destroyed property and set off millions of dollars in damages and firefighting costs. But the most frequent unwelcome visitor -- please allow me to introduce myself -- is water. Our coastal-mountain geography lends itself to torrential downpours -- and low lying areas can be helpless in the face of raging rivers and streams, often choked with logs that once were mighty redwoods and douglas firs in Santa Cruz Mountain forests. In December 1955, after days of heavy rainfall, the San Lorenzo River jumped its banks and took a trip through downtown Santa Cruz. Nearly every business in the area suffered extensive damages and losses. Neighborhoods were at the mercy of the floodwaters and houses were ripped from foundations. Homes along the river in the San Lorenzo Valley were ruined and cabins swept into the torrent. A logjam in Soquel Creek led to Soquel Village being flooded. More than 2,000 residents were evacuated -- and this was a time when the entire population of the county was only 66,500 about 22,000 in the city of Santa Cruz, less than a quarter of today's population. Eight people died and damages were estimated in 1955 dollars at $7.5 million. The Great Flood of '55 led to government funding for a flood control project to tame the routes the San Lorenzo River and Branciforte Creek took through the city -- and for rebuilding downtown Santa Cruz. But that storm was surpassed by the disaster of Jan. 4, 1982, that left 22 people dead and more than $100 million in damages as incessant storms led to devastating flooding and mudslides. The Love Creek slide in Ben Lomond killed 10 people when an entire saturated hillside collapsed. Aptos Creek went on its own death and destruction rampage and Soquel Creek, shades of 1955, was again backed up by a logjam and flooded its namesake village. Although the river levees held in downtown Santa Cruz, the surging San Lorenzo River threw a section of the Soquel Avenue bridge into the water. On March 11, 1995, the Pajaro River's levees failed, flooding Watsonville neighborhoods, the town of Pajaro and miles of rich Pajaro Valley agricultural lands. Sixteen years later, a much discussed and disputed flood control project for the river remains just talk. Our merry band of photographers, reporters and editors have become battle-scarred veterans covering disasters. Today, the effort includes keeping up-to-date emergency information posted on our website, which sees incredible traffic during these events. We solicit and post readers' photos and videos -- and host discussion forums where people in the midst of what is happening share their experience, strength and hope -- and tell other readers what to avoid and how. Meanwhile, our news team constantly updates what we know, when we know it. The next morning, you, the print reader, get to relive the event. And while all of us are feeling weary these days because life just keeps surging over our boundaries and riverbanks, we also know that in Santa Cruz County, the next big thing is inevitably just moving downstream. Don Miller is the editor of the Sentinel. Email him at dmiller@santacruzsentinel.com. You can read his blog at santacruzlive.com/blogs/dmillereditor/ The Sentinel is using Facebook for your feedback and commenting on this page. See our commenting policy. ------- The above article was first published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/ and was posted on the LNostra-Costa Blog with the permission of Don Miller, Editor.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

IL MARE SPAVENTOSO (THE SCARY OCEAN)


COASTAL BEACH 3-MILES NORTH OF
SANTA CRUZ, CA. WHERE THE "TSUNAMI"
HIT CIRCA 1950.
(Photos taken by Gino Campioni)



'BAFFI' CAMPIONI LOOKING AT A CALM PACIFIC OCEAN IN SANTA CRUZ, (C.1950)
-Beware, Baffi! Beware!-

The tsunami in Japan and the tragic events that followed reminded me how scary the ocean can be. My mother would always warn us of this by saying, “Il Mare e traditore” (The ocean is a traitor). What she meant was quite clear to us. The ocean can appear calm one minute; then sweep you out to sea the next showing no mercy. Pretty scary stuff to us kids.

Kristian, my 13-year-old Grandson, asked me if a tsunami had ever hit Santa Cruz. I responded, “Not until now”.

“But Grandpa”, he said, “You write about one in your book.”

The event that Kristian was talking about occurred in the early 1950s. I don’t think it was labeled a tsunami, however, the storm and giant ocean waves did quite a bit of damage. At the time, my family and I were living on the Gulch Ranch, 3-miles north of Santa Cruz.

The following is an excerpt from my book, “La Nostra Costa” (pgs. 299-300) describing the event.

“. . . .circa 1950, a giant rainstorm hit the coast. The rain and wind came down upon us,buffering the walls and roof of our small fragile house. Rain hit the Coast Road in such volume that it quickly caused the drainage ditches to overflow. Water formed on the road, creating wild currents of water which flowed past our house and down into the Gulch. Amid the sounds of rain, wind and rush of flowing water, we could hear the ocean roaring in the not-too-faraway distance.

The whole scene reminded me of a film that Dante (Rodoni) would often show us at (his) ranch. (I think it was a Laurel and Hardy silent feature.) The old flick was a comedy, but rather scary because it depicted and old rickety house situated on a beach. A big storm hit and giant waves swept the house off its foundation and into the ocean. To ride out the storm, the fat man and the skinny guy sat on the roof of their house, as it bobbed about in the ocean. If the 1950 storm had continued, I imagined that we would have gotten into the same situation as those two guys. Thankfully, the rains would stop in time and we would be once again safe. However, in the background we could still hear the roar of the ocean loud and clear.

A few days later, I took a stroll down to the beach. The ground was still wet, but the sun was shining and things were getting back to normal. I walked to the top of the bluff overlooking the beach . . . . What greeted me was something unreal, something that you might now see in a special effects movie. It was as if I was looking at the creation of a whole new world. The surf had hit so hard that it had completely wiped out the sandy beach, exposing the bedrock beneath and had so much force that the tide was driven up into the gulch by about 300 feet (or more). The sides of the gulch were completely denuded of vegetation. It was as if giant bulldozers had carved out a new canyon, making it ready for development. The only difference was that the sides of this canyon were soaking wet and dripping with salt-laden kelp and seawater. As I stood looking agape at this amazing scene, Il Mare in the background kept roaring, its sound now reminiscent of rolling thunder, I could almost hear it saying to me: ‘See there, little boy. This is what I have done in the past and what I can still do in the future. Beware. Beware.’” *


* From the book, “La Nostra Costa” (Our Coast), published by Authorhouse (2006). Copyrighted (2006) by the author, Ivano Franco Comelli. All rights reserved.
"La Nostra Costa" is now available in ebook format: http://www.amazon.com/kindle


Sunday, March 06, 2011

'EAT POLENTA' - T-SHIRT- BY RENO DI CISTERNA




IVANO SAYS: My Grandson, Kristian
is proud to announce that 'Reno Di
Cisterna' has designed a brand new
'EAT POLENTA - THAT'S ITALIAN'
T-Shirt.

THE 'OLD RANCERE SAYS: "If Kristian likes it, I like it!
Sempre Avanti
.