Friday, February 08, 2008

THE FAMILY QUILICI BY NANCY (QUILICI) JACOBS









IVANO SAYS: NANCY (QUILICI)JACOBS WAS BORN AND RAISED ON A RANCIO "SU PER LA COSTA".
SHE IS IN THE PROCESS OF WRITING THE STORY OF THE QUILICI-JACOB FAMILIES. WHAT FOLLOWS BELOW SHOULD GIVE YOU A HINT OF WHAT IS YET TO COME.

PHOTOS: ALL PHOTOS APPEARING ABOVE ARE COPYRIGHTED;ALL RIGHTS RESERVED: COURTESY OF NANCY (GUILICI) JACOBS. TOP PHOTO: ALESSANDRO QUILICI (FATHER) IN ITAY 1925. PHOTO SECOND FROM THE TOP: PIA MARIE DIANDO QUILICI (MOTHER) IN ITALY 1925. PHOTO THIRD FROM THE TOP: PIA MARIE DIANDO QUILICI IN SANTA CRUZ 1960. PHOTO FOURTH FROM THE TOP: GUILIANO QUILICI (BROTHER) US ARMY 1940S. PHOTO FIFTH FROM THE TOP: NANCY QUILICI, HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION,SANTA CRUZ 1960S. PHOTO SECOND FROM THE BOTTOM: DONALD LEE JACOBS AND NANCY QUILICI, WEDDING DAY 1960S. AND BOTTOM PHOTO: PIOLET DONALD LEE JACOBS,59TH STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND, FLYING HIS T-116 JET AIRPLANE,'BANSHEE', KOREA 1952. DONALD LEE JACOBS WAS A VETERAN OF OVER 100 COMBAT MISSIONS AND WAS WOUNDED OVER KOREA.




The Family Quilici

If one digs and digs one comes up with a Roman family that during Roman times moved from Rome to Pompeii and then north again and finally travelling to Lucca where they settled and stayed.

In Lucca,Italy, the family was awarded a Coat of Arms for their accomplishments.

At some point the family must have fallen on hard times. I suspect because the church wanted the families to have children and not practice birth control. I know this because my great grandmother had a fight with the church over this subject. She just wanted two or less children.

In the 1900's the family started to emigrate to America. At this time they were living in San Pietro a Vico, Italy. There were four brothers. Two of the brothers emigrated. Their father was already in America. The two brothers were Joe and Pete.
The youngest brother was Alessandro Quilici. In 1916 he sailed to America and settled near Fort Churchill with his brother Pete.

In the early 1920's Alessandro sold his share of the ranch to his brothers and went home to Italy. There he married Pia Maria Dianda of Lucca. The first born child died. But they had three more children who lived, Mario, Giuliano and Giuliana.

Pia Maria was left in Italy with the three chidren. Alessandro went back to America settling in Davenport, California. There he farmed the Modelo ranch with Modelo and then moved across Scott Creek to the Foothill Ranch and farmed there. Louis Poletti was his partner, possible part owner or full owner. My mother was a white widow which means that she was without her husband from 1926 to 1935. In 1935 Pia Maria boarded the ship Rex with her three children and landed in New York where her brother drove her acrosss the country in what I believe was a Hupmobile car. The family was taken to the Modelo Ranch. My mother did not like America at first but later loved it.

I was born in Davenport in the 1940's. My brothers and sister were more like parents than siblings. I was born Feb 17. My mother said that I was born at 1 a.m. and that they had to drive to Santa Cruz during one of the stormiest nights for me to be born. So I am a stormy weather baby!

I grew up around these things:

My father checking the dam's water level, my dad checking the water pump at Scott's Creek and my dad checking the stability of the bridge at Scotts Creek. My brother Giuliano and I driving to the Big Ranch to get hay. I loved this. I would put on my over alls and go. His name for me was Butch. My brother used to take me to the Lombardi Ranch which was not far from our own and she would serve the most delicious pudding with fresh cream and strawberries. After all these years I can still taste it! It was good! But now if you drive there there is nothing where there used to be a two story white house with a picket fence, a barn and cows.

My brother Giuliano was in WW11 and his military branch of service is ironic and has to do with La Liberte. When I write the book you will see what I am talking about!
My dad taking me to the Cash Store in Davenport and Charlie Bella's and to Louis Poletti's office. My mother cooking and cooking and cooking and washing and cleaning. Every now and then if she was happy she would sing the Italian stornelli or Italian folk songs.

On Saturday we would often go to town and I would go to a movie matinee. I remember watching numerous John Payne movies at the old Santa Cruz theatre.

I liked the barn and the horses and spent a lot of time with them but I also liked to hike to the top level of the ranch which I did on a regular basis. I loved to read and one of the first books that I read was Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. I was also a little daydreamer which sometimes got me into trouble but may have also led me to my husband.

My first experience with school was when I attended Pacific School in Davenport, California. The teachers were Mrs. Thompson and Mrs Embree. At first, I did not like school but later I came to love going and learning and they could not keep me away.
It was a small school with two rooms. It tended to be windy and cold and foggy at the school. The students were from diverse backgrounds. I can remember Paul Della Santina and Antonette Stagi. I know that they were Italian. All the teaching was done in the old fashioned way. The alphabet was up above the chalk board and if a student misspelled a word they had to correct it by writing it ten times. I loved to read and kept reading and reading and reading.

Eleanor Gregory was one of my little friends as was Rosanne Franklin and her brother John Franklin.

I liked to play with the tether ball or sometimes the "teeter totter". I can still see Mrs. Thompson eating her lunch which consisted of a sandwich and an apple and whatever she had in her thermos.

My mother never had to worry about me because at a very young age I hated alcohol and cigarettes etc., but I liked to eat. I have always had a weight problem. So, all my life I have had to watch what I eat. Absolutely hate alcohol. For me the worst was "grappa" because I think it must be 98% alcohol. The adults would talk about it as if it was something special. I sneaked a peek and a small taste on my little finger when I was little. It made me feel queasy. It made no sense to me to drink something that would make you sick. EVEN AS A SMALL CHILD Nancy did not do what Nancy did not want to do! Period, Period Period! I kept to myself and tended to be very quiet.

In high school I did like to play tennis and I liked to walk for miles and miles and miles. I loved a gentle wind. On a walk like that I was in heaven!
On the ranch we had large ceramic containers filled with brine for curing olives which was another sort of distasteful thing to me. I did like the olive oil. We always bought in large quantities. I am not sure of the man who came to the ranch to sell the olive oil. His name may have been Martinelli. Panattone, the peddler also came to the ranch. That was a big event because we always needed something. I still have a black shawl that my mother bought to go to a funeral. She wanted solid black but he did not have a solid black one. He was sold out so she had to get one with gold threads sparsely mixed in. Our ranch was one of the last on his route from Santa Cruz. We were a good ten miles north of Santa Cruz!


I loved the ranch because it was so unspoiled and so unbelievably simple and beautiful. I loved exploring the abandoned barn on the third tier of the ranch. Maybe that is why to this day antiques fascinate me because they have a story to tell.


In 1955 it all came to an end. We moved to Santa Cruz. I helped design the house. I don't know why but my mother decided I should have a say in it but I did. This was ironic because when my brother died in 2002 he left me the house and I redesigned it again. I do not know what got into me but I decided to make it a sexier house using color and curves which it already had. For 1955 it must have been an impressive house because it actually impresses me today as well. George Wilson was the builder. Originally, it had wood roof shingles but someone took them off along the way and it now has asphalt tile shingles.

ABOUT ME:
I attended Santa Cruz high School, my Davenport friend there was John Franklin
I attended Cabrillo College, my friends there were and still are: Larry Wallace, Judy Nielsen and Sandy Mundt
I attended San Jose State
I attended Monterey Peninsula College, my friend is Marilyn Vassallo
I used the knowledge from Monterey Peninsula College the most
I studied art, design, law, and real estate. I have a real estate license which I maintain by doing continuing education classes.

I married Lt. Donald L. Jacobs, Navy pilot who received his wings at Pensacola, Florida and his master's degree from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. He was from Cheyenne, Wyoming. When we met our relationship was 98% Bridges at Toko Ri and 2% Duel in the Sun.

My husband's friends were
Col. Robert F. Overmeyer, pilot astronaut of the space ship Columbia
Rear Admiral Shumaker, not sure of name spelling but the one who wrote a book about the Hanoi Hilton, Rear Admiral West, numerous other Rear Admirals, Commanders etc.
Eldon Dedini, Cartoonist for Playboy magazine
Gus Arrioloa, Cartoonist
Hank Ketcham, Cartoonist
James Watts, police Chief/Captain, Pacific Grove retired.

My husband and I both met Alex Haley briefly in Los Angeles. He wrote Roots.
I briefly met Kesey who wrote One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in Santa Cruz in the 1960's.

My friend was Virginia Conroy, Eldon Dedini's wife for whom I posed and she did a painting of me. A "talking to friend" was Jeremy Slate.

Five years after my husband died I met Retired Navy Commander Rene Gonzales with whom I had a friend relationship, it could not be more, because, he too, was diagnosed with cancer. We met Cinco De Mayo 1995 and he was dead September 1996.
I would like to comment that the whole decade of the 1990's was spent with people who eventually died of cancer. I decided that the Good Lord was trying to tell me something and so I have been single ever since!

Life has taken me back to my beginning which I loved the most next to my husband! I don't know why. Maybe because one finds a simple truth in being close to the earth and caring for one's family.
Now, I would like to write a book, enjoy life, listen to Italian music and spend more time in Santa Cruz where I have new and very interesting friends from "La Costa".

62 comments:

Canadian Furlan said...

Nancy. This is an excellent summary of your family and your life. More importantly are your Italian roots and how you have maintained them. Ivano has created an excellent blogg. Your parents were certainly visionaries to travel to the US for a better life during those early years. I can only admire all the immigrants for their will to improve at every possible opportunity. Your husband's career certainly was distinguished. I could imagine the after dinner discussions. I am certain he could teach some of our youth today about loyalty and work ethics. I like your outlook on life. Keep the comments flowing. I enjoy reading them.

Ciao

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

Thanks Nancy. Great bio. There are hundreds and hundreds of stories "su per la costa". Unfortunately, I was unable to include all of them in "La Nostra Costa". One of the reason for the creation of the 'LNostra-Costa' blagga is to have people, such as Nancy, write about their families for others to read. There is so much history out there that it should not go unrecorded. ivn0

Ralph Moceo said...

Thank you. It was very interesting.

Ralph Moceo

carol (costella) schwartz said...

..... I love reading all of it! Nancy Jacobs sounds so familiar to me -- I'm sure our paths have crossed somewhere. What a wonderful place to grow up. Carol

carolina cariola said...

And I thought I had an interesting life. A great story. Hurry up Nancy and write the book. Maybe I will follow up with one of my own. Carrie

LaNorma said...

Nancy, (your) story is great – can’t wait for (the) book to be completed. Great story and great fotos.

I remember coming to your ranch with my parents (of course) – we only came a few times but I remember the fotos of your parents wedding on the wall or maybe it was the ones you printed.

... I do remember thinking how handsome they were. The old Italians referred to your parents
as Pia and “il Quilici”. It seems the men always went by a nickname or their last name.

Nancy – your parents bought a refrigerator from my parents for a rental apartment they had in Santa Cruz. My parents had won it at an Italian function at the SC Civic Auditorium. Can’t remember
Exactly what it was.

Also do you remember the adjacent ranch to yours (I believe if memory serves me correctly) where the DiGrazias farmed – Narciso & Ida. I remember visiting them also and on several occasions also visiting them was Al Capone’s sister – Concetta Miamo. She was somewhat different than all our Mom’s. She wore lots of jewelry and much more “dressed up” – I do not remember her husband Sam Miamo (I think he is still alive??)


Grazie & ciao per ora – LaNorma

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

I was wondering when Big Al 'Scarface' Capone would make the Blagga. I mention his name in 'La Nostra Costa", page 5, just in passing; however, he and his family (as LaNorma points out) did have a history with Santa Cruz County, especially during Prohibition.

Speaking of names. I have found out the La Norma is not an original. There was a famous areialist who performed for the Ringling Bros Circus back in the 1950's, who billed herself as "La Norma". (Source: "Those Amazing Ringlings and their Circus",
p.290. Of course our LaNorma is much more talented. ivno

Anonymous said...

To answer some questions, yes the photos on this blog are the very same ones that hung on the wall on the ranch, I do not remember Al Capone or his sister because it would have been too hard for me to distinguish the sister from the others. As a child I would have thought that the visitor was just all dressed up for a wedding or perish the thought, a funeral. HOWEVER, guess who I met this last summer while I was in Santa Cruz??? non other than Al Capone's sister's son! I found it unbelievable because I always associated him with Chicago and later in life I did not much care for Al Capone because, remember, I hated alcohol! I know I must have driven all those Italians crazy because Italians always like wine but NOT ME! I also hate drugs and it was my misfortune to have to live through the 1960's stone cold sober! Think about it! Thank God for my husband and Pacific Grove at that time.
I later learned that those living in Lucca used many herbs and that is what I use if I am sick. My body responds well to them.
Back to the ranch, yes I do remember the neighbors but the name Rosina still stands out in my mind. She seemed to be a very good friend of my mother's because she and Rosina would spend hours on the phone. It was always Rosina this and Rosina that!
The people that I remember clearly are Angelina Novelli and her husband and Aladino. I do not know Aladino's last name. They were very close to my parents.
My mother may have worked for Moceo at the packing house. She worked most of her life. No free ride for her, poor thing. She did basically have a kind heart as did my father.
I have vivid memories of log cabin syrup, pet milk, cornmeal/polenta, olive oil, olives, eggs, parmesan cheese and for some strange reason my father liked telame cheese, and lots of spaghetti with or without vegetables. You know that olive oil that we bought from Martinelli was in what to me as a child seemed HUGE factory sealed tins of extra virgin Martinelli olive oil.
I have another picture of the car that my dad bought in 1953. It is a 1953 Buick AND THE BONUS IS I TOOK THE PICTURE ON THE RANCH! However, it is not the best picture in the world but I can tell where everything was and that would explain the layout of the ranch. Actually I do have a complete set of photographs of the ranch that I took.
Back to Al Capone, what happened to all his money?
The only way that one might be able to even justify his actions is if he was born in Cabrini District in Chicago. Those poor Italians did not have a chance! It was awful!
Any input is welcome.
I now own the duplex that my parents bought the refrigerator for but I had to pay for it. It was not an inheritance as the house at 503 was. I also remodeled the back unit of the duplex.
I hope that I did not forget anything.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

I think that I left the cialde recipe with the wrong heading.
I also would like to say that the name Quinto definitely RINGS A BELL. I would suspect that Quinto was a friend of my parents.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Pat Polentoni said...

Great start to the book, Nancy. Remember to include all those wonderful old recipies. There is a whole different readers' audience for them. Let us know when it will be published.

Carolina: I can't wait for your book to be publish also. I have a great title for it. "Carrie's Carrying-ons". You should have enough of those to fill a encyclopedia.

P/p

Anonymous said...

About alcohol and wine etc.
No one in our family liked the bars. We avoided them, except for Charlie Bella's. Charlie Bella was the social center for Davenport at one time.
My father made piccino.
Years later I found out that the Romans made piccino. Piccino is wine diluted with water. The Romans according to what I found out used the wine to clean the water of bacteria & other things and then drank the wine/water mixture.
I would say that the people of the Roman days were probably quite healthy. They had water sterilized by wine, they had running water from the aqueducts and most important they had baths and outdoor toilets. And they were vegetarians.
The Turkish baths of today can date their origins to those of Roman times.
They were so tecnologically advanced that there are things today that they did that cannot be reproduced by modern science. Glassmaking is one of them. They actually had double paned glass.
Much of the Roman technology used Greek examples or Greek input.
I love history. The other interesting society to me is that of the ancient Egyptians.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

I want to thank Ivano Comelli for having this blog site.
It was my brother, Giuliano's wish that some degree of recognition be given to Italians. He felt that they were in a way oppressed. Remember, even though, he was not highly educated he had a lot of common sense and raw intelligence and really good values.
Back to history. Throughout history the Germans have done things that have no explanation other than they have a treacherous streak.
I found out that the city of Cologne was actually a Roman city by the original name of Colonia during Roman times. And that the barbarians surrounded it. They continued to live like that for centuries. Remember the Roman Empire was broken up into 36 countries so there is a lot of Roman influence all over Europe.
Back to the Germans.
When Spartacus was fighting the Romans he actually won and actually made his way to freedom. It was the German segment of his group that decided to go back into Italy all the way down to the boot. And it was in fighting his way back up north that the German group decided that they were smarter than Spartacus and left the Spartacus group. They were no match for the Roman legions and they all ended up dead. This so weakened the group of Spartacus that he was captured by the Romans and hung on the cross.
There are other numerous treacheries by the Germans, a notable one is when a German, Roman trained General massacred all the Roman legions in Germany. It goes on but the most notable in modern times is the betrayal of Stalin and the siege of Stalingrad in Russia. I think that it went on for six or seven years. The Russians really suffered big time. Add to that the massacre of Italian troops in Greece and one should arrive at the conclusion that the German's are not to be trusted. I suspect that Mussolini himself was of barabrian descent because he made grievous mistakes that had tragic consequences for his country. To be fair to the Germans I will say that if Mussolini could not fight the war financially he should have remained neutral. Hitler may have had a hand in his decision. The end result was a fractured country, those for Mussolini and those against Mussolini which left the Germans to fight on their own with devastating results in Italy itself.
I am of the opinion that between the church (NOT God) but the church as run by man and the barbarians Italy will have to examine itself very closely and start to truthfully deal with these things and as an underdog since it lost the war.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

johnny Coltivita said...

Wow, Nancy!! I'm getting a real history education here. The Italians, Romans, Germans, Egyptians, and Al Capone to boot. You have enough stuff here to start your own Blogga. You could call it 'Nancy's Hot off the Griddle History Blogga' . Once in a while you could throw in an old recipe or two. That certainly would peek their interest.

I must say that I prefer my Vino Rosso
d' Tavola to that 'Piccino' stuff you described. I would think all that 'bacteria stuff' would grab hold of your inners. Maybe it wasn't lead poisoning that killed off the Romans. JC

Canadian Furlan said...

Nancy... Now you got the juices flowing...You certainly are well informed. I don't want to go as far as painting all Germans as not being trustworthy however. That is a little harsh. However, you are correct in stating the facts. Mussolini did make many many mistakes and he certainly did not have the financial backing to enter a World War. And yes I agree with you Mussolini should have taken the same side as Switzerland and remained Neutral. If you dig deep enough Chamberlain the Prime Minister of England prior to Churchhill did try to convince Mussolini to remain neutral, for the very fact that Italy was part of the Allies during WWI. And if you recall Mussolini during one of his initial propaganda moments came back to the World claiming he was the catalyst in guaranteeing in writing that he received confirmation of peace in Europe between England and Germany. And yes Mussolini did take the Italians to slaughter that I have confirmed facts in writing. If you recall in some of my earlier comments, my uncle was one of the many Italian soldiers who did not return from Greece. And I also will confirm as you stated that Italy was divided those that remained loyal to Mussolini and those that were not, and some families were found in this predicament who's sons were against each other. But as early as 1940 the resistance within Italy commenced, as everyone knows them the "Partigiani" the Partisans many of whom were returning soldiers from the Greek front. Italy has suffered greatly due to one person and is still feeling the effects not as severe as back in 1943 but to some extent with it's inability to form a solid government. We can all agree on this Italy has not had a solid government since Mussolini gained control of Italy back in 1922...I can go on with this one for a while. I think we have to just get together and compare our notes Nancy..

Anonymous said...

Dear Johnny Colavita:
Where do you live?
If you do not live on a ranch that has no piped in running water and must get the water from the CRICK (creek) then ENJOY your VINO!
OTHERWISE, YOU SURE AS HELL BETTER DO SOMETHING ABOUT THOSE LITTLE BACTERIA that live in the water!
By the way, I loved drinking the water straight from the creek and paid the price! The rest of the family felt well, but I was sick a lot because of it!
Nancy Quilici Jacobs
Have a good laugh!

Anonymous said...

To The Canadian Furlan:
I don't see the disagreement. We basically agree.
Here are some other interesting tidbits.
The United States considered making Italy one of its states because of the Communist threat.
The United States actually used the crime bosses to win the war.
What do you perceive the problem to be with the Italian's lack of a properly functioning government?
What do you think about the above statements?
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

2nd Answer to Johhny Colavita
Johnny Colavita:
Do you realize that the western half of the Roman Empire lasted another 1000 or 1500 years after the fall of the eastern half! So how could lead poisoning have killed them off if half of the empire survived?
Istanbul used to be Constantinople and it lasted for a long time. They had stunning chariot races in Constantinople. By the way, it was the Emperor Constantine that recognized Christianity! The western half was not conquered until before Columbus discovered America.
Two Muslim leaders tried, the first failed and the second finally succeeded but they were 5 to 800 years apart.
The French had taken the ark of the covenant to Constantinople and some say that it went back to France via the French Knights before Constantiniople fell. But no one knows for sure.
If I am not mistaken Constantinople became Istanbul and a Muslim domain. The grand Hagia Sofia became a Muslim mosque.
AND THAT WAS THE END OF THE EMPIRE!
The next Empire was the Muslim Ottoman Empire which lasted until the first WW if I am not mistaken. The English disbanded it but created the current middle east problem with the countries that they created grouping enemies together in one country.
Garibaldi reunited Italy in the 19th century, I think but I am not sure of the century. This might be a reason that Italy is having problems. It is a fairly new country. For this reason alone it should have never entered WW11.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

Ivano's Blog
Ivano's Blog is great!
It gives Italians a place to express themselves.
I have no desire to have my own blog.
I will try to write a book because there are things that need to be told but that is as far as I go!
Ivano! Keep up the good work!
I really enjoy seeing who your next presentation is!
And---
The people presented are always wonderful surprises!
About the recipes, I try to provide them if I know the dish that a person is looking for.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

anonymous german-american said...

Nancy: It is obvious that you are well read and 'steeped'in History.
However, I take exception to your inferences and generalizations of the German People. To infer (because of your study of German history)that all Germans are untrustworthy,is fallacious and narrow minded on your part.

Following that way of thinking, one could infer that because of the History of the Sicilian Mafia, both here and Italy, all Italians are Criminals and shysters.

Further, because they (the Italians) surrendered in the middle of a War and turned against their own ally (Germany), one could infer that all Italians were untrustworthy and cowards.

Also, since you are a student of German History, you must already know that Hitler used his own brand of 'history' to infer that all Jews were inferior and not to be trusted. Inferences and generalizations about a people or a nation are dangerous.

Good luck on your book. Word of advice: "Stick with family history."

Canadian Furlan said...

Nancy... Yes I am in agreement with your statements except for the one statement you made about the German people. And as our German American brother has responded to we cannot arbitrarily paint an entire race with one paint brush regardless of what took place in History.
Nancy to answer your question yes Italy became a country in 1860 which is relatively young for a country. Prior to 1860 it was comprised of many smaller provinces which were governed by Austria, Spain, France to name a few. This is one of the reasons why there is an array of different dialects in Italy. One example of Spanish dominance is still standing in Caserta Napoli (Naples) the Spanish Royal Palace still stands today. Garibaldi was a great man he assisted in Uniting Italy together with Dante Alghierri (Dante's Italian became the mainstream language in the newly formed Italy of 1860, Dante was from Toscana). As a matter of fact President Lincoln called upon Garibaldi during the on set of the US Civil War to assist the US President with gaining control of a possible separation in the US. I can go on with this... I love history and most importantly anything related with Italy and surrounding countries. One more thing on Mussolini, during his early years in power he had a dream of uniting Italy into a strong power house and at one point abolished all dialects, however he did it in such a way where he neglected certain facets of the country, Mussolini had a big problem with the Southern portion of Italy and neglected it both in language and customs. As you know Mussolini was against Organized crime which was prevalent in Southern Italy for centuries, mainly because the Fascists were a bunch of thugs all on their own. But Mussolini held our Southern Italian brothers in contempt for many things and yes organized crime or the MAFIA did assist the allies against the Fascists and Nazis. They banded together from both North America and Italy to infiltrate and conquer the oppression. Nancy to answer your question why Italy has not held a solid government since Fascism is somewhat of a mystery but speaking with many people in Italy today they have a disregard for both Politics and the Church. Primarily because both of them held the Italian people in some form of oppression. Now understand when I speak about the Church I am not referring to Religion but rather the individuals who ran and organized the Church. Italians in general are very Religious and believe in their Catholic Faith however understand throughout the centuries the Church (The People) governed and they did it similar to a dictatorship.
Nancy I enjoy your feedback. Lets keep this going however lets keep in mind that this Blogg that Ivano established is to promote our Italian Heritage and as yourself I am first generation Italian Canadian I am proud of my heritage and what my parents did to ensure a better life for all of us. Lets not take this Blogg into areas of politics that may promote disrespect for others...

Ciao e Mandi

johnny coltivita said...

Looks like you stirred up a hornet's nest, Nancy. As to your question about the Romans and lead poisoning, studys have shown that lead poisoning takes a long time, perhaps generations, to accumulate in the system and then do its dirty work.

In regards to my drinking from a Creek: Yes, I did that at a very early age, until one day I saw an old rancher take a "pisciatta' up the creek from where I was drinking. That was it for me.

As to where I live: I really don't know you that well, and besides my girlfriend does not want me to give that information out. Bouna fortuna. JC

Anonymous said...

The word Untrustworthy was never used by me.
I said treacherous and I still believe that the Germans have had the treacherous trait throughout history. I do not think that the INDIVIDUAL German is like that but that there have been German rulers/leaders who have displayed that trait. Consider what happened to Spartacus.
I also believe that the German people paid a far too heavy price for the doings of Hitler. Hitler's last days in the bunker show a complete disregard for his people. He had very young men defending Berlin and he would not abdicate to save the people any more suffering. I believe that by his decree German soldiers who were in the way of water were killed by the water because Hitler would not give the orders to save them.
He had a superman complex. Here again it might be that the Germans have felt oppressed and needed to feel or be better than others.
I also think that whoever came up with the concentration camp idea was indeed evil. Now here I do blame the German people because they were in solidarity with a mad man who had set up these concentration camps for the sole purpose of exterminating an entire group of people. The German people should have done like the Italians and created partisan groups to fight Hitler because, at least, whether they lost their lives or not they would have been doing the RIGHT thing! Doing the right thing to me is more important than showing solidarity.
I am not going to name any names but I met two German women who live in Pebble Beach. One is very pleasant and easy to talk to etc. The other one is still fixated on the German superman complex. I wish that I could have taped the conversation. These women did not live together but in separate houses.
So yes not all Germans are alike.
About the Italians, I guess my brother got it right when he said that they felt oppressed. I agree about the church. Throuhgout history there have been many popes who were criminals or close to it.
There are things in the church that are of great value. There was an exorcism in 1949 that was kept quiet but was finally shown on Unsolved Mysteries. I do think that we are in a constant fight between good and evil. I do believe in God but not the one that speaks through a minister etc. God speaks for himself and in his teachings.
AGAIN I WISH THAT I COULD HAVE TAPED THE CONVERSATION WITH THE GERMAN LADY for the German American reader. It would have been an eye opener! SHE WAS OF THE OLD GERMANY AND IN THE SAME THOUGHT PATTERN.
As for my book, it will not be political. Let others write political books but I will write about what pertains to me personally and my family's journey.

Anonymous said...

To Jonny Colavita:
About lead poisoning, generations maybe but not centuries.
About the creek, have you seen the creek? Not easy to get to unless you are a kid or checking the pump.
Enjoy your girlfriend. You are indeed lucky to have a girlfriend! These days it is hard for anyone to find someone.
The hornets nest is the word treacherous that people mistake for untrustworthy. I never said untrustworthy.
You don't much like me but that is O. K.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

Italian American
magazine
Put out by the Sons of Italy Foundation
Summer 2007 Edition
Vol.X11, No.3
I am happy to present the articles in this magazine for you to read so that you can take issue with them.
The Articles are:
Italy Under Mussolini
Celebrating Garibaldi's 200th Birthday
and there is kind of an interesting article about the Italians of Jamestown, the glassblowers. Another article about:
And Growing Up in Fascist Italy by Andrea Meloni
There is also a book called The Fall of Mussolini by Philip Morgan
To the Canadian Furlan let me know what you think.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

For those of you who want to get up close and personal with Adolph Hitler, read his book Mein Kampf. I think that is how you spell it. Another book is Berlin Diary by William Shirer.
From the past, comes Joe Carcione who wrote The Green Grocer a wonderful book about vegetables in general and many from the coast.
Again for Colavita, everyone had to drink the same water except my father sterilized the farmhouse water with wine. I liked to drink at the creek. That is all!
I now see why no Italian ever asked me out. I do respect your viewpoints and comments.
The ones who did ask me out were either American/military, Spanish, highly educated Russians, and an Australian. I am still friends with one of the Russians and the Australian but just friends because I decided in the 1990's that God was trying to tell me something when everyone was dying.
I am going to take a little vacation because Sunday is my birthday.
I will read the blog again on Monday.
I enjoy reading the Canadian Furlan's comments so keep them coming.
And you all have some books to read!
Or, if you would like to suggest some books for me to read I would like that. Learning requires that you have an open mind.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

A German American said...

I think the exact statement in your comments, Nancy, is "..........
one should arrive at the conclusion that the German's are not to be trusted." I think the word "untrustworthy" pretty well summarises that statement. The word "treacherous" conjurs up even worse connotations.

To reaffirm your convictions about the German people using the thinking of one old German Woman, to me, is simply incredible.

Nancy you are obiviously a well read person. However, it seems to me that you tend to 'cherry-pick' your readings and observations to fit your own beliefs. Give me a break. Get a life. Get on with your book. Enough of this BS.

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

I think it's time for me to step in here. Nancy I think you are right. Let's all take a break. I must admit that I have found all this history extremely interesting. In Nancy and the Canadian Furlan, and Anonymous German American, the Blagga certainly has entertained some able scholars. Even Johnny Coltivita, who mispelled Buono put spelled "Pisciatta" correctly had something constructive to say.
Thanks to one an all for your contributions.

Nancy I do have two readings I would recommend and they are both on the this "Blagga" The first one is entitled, "Figlio Di Santa Croce Len Klempnauer" and it can be found in the October 2006 archives, or simply type the title of the article in the space provide at the top left corner of the front page of the blagga. Then clicca search.

The second article is entitled, "Amica Della Costa Cathy Brovia Remembers." It can be found in the June 2007 archives, or, as above, type the title in the search option space.

Nancy, I recommend these two articles because they describe the hardships experience by two non-Italian families during the same years our families were farming 'su per la costa'. I found that their stories were compelling and very similar to what our families were experiencing.

As Len Klempnauer points out this was expecially true during WW II, when German Aliens were subject to the same Restrictions as the Italians and Japanese. The one thing we all had in common then, was that we were strangers in our own Land. Yet, and this was especially true of the children who were born here, we were all Americans. In the end that proved to be our salvation. ivno

Anonymous said...

My cousin emailed me. I need to make a last statement before I close up until Monday.
To the German American:
I take issue with cherry pick. DAMN IT I ASKED for people TO RECOMMEND A BOOK. HAVE YOU DONE IT? What about your books are they cherry picked???
Ivano and the Canadian Furlan are the only ones who are attempting to educate.
I have another book here that may or may not be of interest to you. It is called Capone, The Life and World of Al Capone, by John Kobler
I am going to print an excerpt from the book that may explain many things and then I AM DONE at least for this week-end.
page 19. FROM THE BOOK (NOT NANCY) AND IF YOU HAVE A BETTER BOOK SUGGEST IT!
Illiteracy among the Italian immigrants ran around 60 %, by far the highest percentage of any foreign group, and because their children were obliged to work at so early an age fewer than 1 per cent ever got to high school. According to a 1910 survey of fifteen nationalities in New York City schools, the ItaloAmericans led in retardation- that is, they advanced from grade to grade at ages older than the ages of pupils in the other national groups. But contrary to a widespread canard no survey ascribed this failure to mental inferiority.
The Italians were clannish and wary of outsiders. Centuries of exploitation by both foreign invaders and rapacious domestic masters had taught them to mistrust authority. They considered politicians and police as natural enemies. The laws they felt had been made to protect the rich and enslave the poor. Appointment to government office seemed to them a license to steal. Early Italian immigrants tended to place loyalty to family and community above loyalty to their adopted country and they did not necessarily condemn those who transgressed against the new society.
ABOVE FROM THE BOOK AND IF YOU HAVE A BETTER BOOK SUGGEST IT!

If you all feel that you are right. So be it! You are then right. That means Colavito, the German American etc. You are Right.
Now then, do you all feel better???? Also, what makes you think that the books that I recommended support my viewpoint. They most certainly DO NOT but they do give the reader an insight into history. That is all. NO CHERRY PICKING HERE! Unbelievable!
Further, I agree that we disagree but probably not about all things.

Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Canadian Furlan said...

Nancy... Thanks for the articles I will definitely look them up. With the internet our resources are unlimited. Regarding Mussolini when I speak to my parent who both grew up under Fascism my Father born 1924 and Mother 1927 they both confirm that he instilled discipline especially in the schools where education was primary for the Fascists. In addition there was a program in Italy during the late 1920's early 30's where land in the Southern part of Italy was given to people to cultivate and make productive.Many people from Friuli and other parts of the North relocated to Southern Italy because of this offering of large portions of land. My parents both said that the early years of Fascism appeared positive instilling discipline and as the saying goes Mussolini ensured the Trains arrived on time. Maybe this is the only part of Mussolini's Fascism that made any sense... because as I mentioned before from 1922-1943 during Italian Fascism these years are called the "Dark Years" for Italy...

Ciao e Mandi

johnny coltivita said...

Nancy: It seems that I may have offended you. If so, I'm sorry and I sincerely apologize. I'm just wary of any Italian who doesn't like wine or grappa. It's just my nature.

Happy Birthday. JC

jerry mungai said...

Wow, brings back memories of names and places; unfortunately, tho, I have trouble putting them all together. One name stands out, Antonette Stagi; her mom, as you know, is Geo. Mungai's mom. She must be in her hi nineties, by now. Jerru

carolina cariola said...

HAPPY BIRTHDAY NANCY. ENJOY YOUR DAY AND DON'T LET THE POLENTAHEADS OF THE WORLD GET TO YOU. CARRIE

Pat Polentoni said...

Carrie: I resemble that remark!! Nancy, pay no mind. All polentaheads are not bad. Have a very Happy Birthday. P/p

Anonymous said...

I am back, probably as controversial as ever but at least I hope that you are all thinking!
My life has had many contradictions. Here are interesting happenings in my life, especially, for the German American.
When I was in College I had two fairly close girlfriends. One was 100% German and the other was 100% Greek.
I was studying design and I loved design. There was a show in San Francisco and I talked them into going.
We saw the textile design show. We met a free lance photographer who had an idea of doing a Playboy of the month from each country. We all declined.
We then went to a coffee shop, I think it was in North Beach. We spent the night talking and talking. We discussed the German situation etc. The German gal said in a very positive fashion that there were many things in Germany to appreciate. She talked about the castles, she talked about the handsome Prussian men. She loved Oktoberfest and liked to drink a little beer. I have to say that I like yodeling and the Bavarian Alps. She mentioned Dresden china and was upset that the city of Dresden was destroyed during WW11. She also mentioned that her family lost everything during the war and they ended up buying with the little money they had and some that they had to borrow an apple ranch in Watsonville.
As a note of interest beer was developed in Egypt and does have some nutritional value.
On the other hand, you have my mother not my father because my father's family started to emigrate in the 1860's to America.
My mother's family was caught up smack dab in the middle of the Fascist era. She had a relative die in a concentration camp and they were not Jewish either. Then her sister's husband was killed by a German sniper while getting some food for his daughter. This put a tremendous burden on my mother who then had to work to support everyone.
In 1935 she finally came to America!
And ended up in Davenport.
Here it gets a little funny because someone from the U. S. government came to the ranch to see if we were spies etc. He got my mother AND
HE GOT AN EARFUL!
Here is some of what I remember. She started by saying completely exasperated whats matter with you? Listen to whata I have to say and you betta listen good!
She went through EACH and EVERY ordeal that she had to go through in Fascist Italy.
She then said any hardship, any discrimination that I suffer here in thisa country isa nothing compared to what I suffer in Italy!
Lets put it this way, by the time that she got through the government guys left NEVER to return. Even as a child I was thinking that they were sorry that they came or even asked anything!
For that reason it has always been hard to feel that I or any of the family was discriminated against because everything that happened in Italy was FAR WORSE.
My brother did express his opinion that the Italians were oppressed but he never said by whom. He said that Italians are never given credit for great accomplishments if it can be helped.
To Colavita, you are not alone in feeling the way that you do about drinking. I told you I drove my family, probably, crazy because I did not like alcohol or drugs, I liked to read and worst of all for them I HAD A STRONG WILL and If I wanted to be I could be very disciplined.
I was my own person.
I perfected my English so that I could pass myself off as being English and if they asked I would say sometimes English, sometimes Italian just to gauge reactions. I found that this country is so diverse that it really did not matter much.
I did pass up the chance to marry a wealthy man in society while I was in college because I knew my family would not fit in and I chose my family and that is the only sacrifice that I made.
When my husband came into the picture, he did not care because he was from Wyoming and from a ranching family.
So it all worked out.
As my mother used to say if you have food on the table and no one is trying to kill you be happy!
Despite the hardships on the ranch, sometimes I could hear my mother singing the stornelli (Italian folk songs).
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Canadian Furlan said...

Nancy... I am glad you are back. You certainly know your history and you so eloquently describe the hardships your Mother went through under the Fascist regime in Italia. I can relate to this since as I mentioned in my past comments both of my parents grew up under Fascist rule. My parents recall the oppression vividly especially my Father who lost two brothers during this time and one was captured by the British fortunately and sent to South Africa for the remainder of the war. In addition, my Father recalls when the Fascists, during the height of the War, demanded that all married women in Italy give up their gold wedding bands for the war effort. My Great Grandfather who was born in 1860 and was in his early eighties at the time said "This is a big disgrace.. where are these Fascists going to take Italy"?? Now for some history, my Great Grand Father recalls, at a very early age, Garibaldi's horse men running into his home town during the early years of Italy's formation...and witnessed the sacrifices Italy endured during WWI and the final disgrace of the Fascists. Nancy I can see where your Mother had no fear of any officials after going through the Fascist era. As a matter of fact my father always challenges the customs officials when we drive over to the USA. He never fails to tell them, very politely, that he was captured by the Nazis' during WWII, so don't think you can even try to intimidate me. Luckily we are always passed through and never detained.
Take care keep the comments flowing...

Ciao

Anonymous said...

To the Canadian Furlan:
If you can get your hands on the summer edition of the Italian America Vol. X11 No. 3 read it because it will substantiate everything that you are saying about Mussolini.
My mother's family suffered greatly because of Mussolini's incompetence. I don't know what else you could call it.
I love history and archaeology. I had a Russian instructor friend who taped many hours on various historical happenings so between reading and the tapes I learned a lot.
I will say that all these historical things are well known in universities around the country and more so at Harvard etc. The Russian was educated in Moscow but left when he got his first window of opportunity. Stalin was another brutal dictator type.
In one of the tapes I learned that people who come to the United States tend to get along well with each other including the Muslims but as soon as you transport them back to their country of origin all the hatred surfaces. I found this to be quite interesting.
My thinking is that this country has many refugees from all over the world, people who sought a better life here because of the turmoil in their own countries and so we all get along well.
I will say that I have felt some hostility on this blog towards me.
It is baffling.
But I think that it has to do with alcohol/wine etc. and me not being a drinker.
Another aspect might be that Tuscany was in ancient times Etruria and those ancient people allowed women to be equal to men. As a result there were many strong women in their society.
Tuscany has had some interesting history. The Romans, French and Spanish have ruled there but it has also been quite independent with a great love of liberty as a Grand Duchy, if I am not mistaken.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

To Mungai
I had a complete set of photographs of the students who attended Pacific School that were taken from the garage in Santa Cruz. The photographs were of all the students who attended Pacific School. I remember the names of some, Saldavia, Preston Sullivan, De Jesus, Novelli, Leon and Eleanor Gregory. Leon Gregory works for Gottschalks in Santa Cruz. I spoke to him and Eleanor this last summer. Eleanor Gregory is a teacher and she remembers playing with me on the teeter totter at Pacific School. And Billy Shepp and his brother. I still have some photographs left at the storage bin.
I still had my report cards as well. I was kept back but not because of retardation. I went to school speaking NOT a word of English. I had to learn the language from scratch.
I used to rack up those A's and B's and sometimes a C. I loved to get the stars in my catechism book. The cathecism book I still have with all the stars. I had my report cards until they got stolen from the garage. And I had a photograph of Pacific School but no more.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

Ivano:
I stayed up late last night to read the two articles that you recommended.
If you think that you had it hard there is always someone who had it harder.
I won't have time to write on the blog much. I will check it next week. I will answer those who leave a message but I am involved in helping to retain the Police Dept. In Pacific Grove. They are trying to contract it out or drastically reduce it in size which they have already done.
I attended the first meeting tonight.
I hope that Saturday is a great success for you Ivano!
As a point of interest, my family drank chianti, burgundy and used marsala or vermouth for cooking.
Much success!
Somewhere LATE last night I read a comment by Gino Campioni that he left on the Brovia piece. I agree with his comment.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs




Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

For the Canadian Furlan
Aldo De Rose who lives in Salinas and is involved with the Sons of Italy is an Italian /Canadian who moved to this area a long time ago!
Thought you might find this interesting.
There is also an Italain culture Museum here in Monterey but I think that it displays mostly Sicilian culture. I say Sicilian because Monterey is known for its fishing industry and most of the fisherman were Sicilian. We have a Santa Rosalia Festival which is a festival brought from Sicily. It happens every September. I cannot say with certainty because I have not been to the Museum as to whether it is strictly Sicilian. What else would it be here in this area?
The Sicilians seem to have done very well for themselves here.
There are several mulitmillionaires, who have stunning houses.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Canadian Furlan said...

Thanks Nancy
The last time I visited California we stayed in San Francisco over looking Alcatraz. I spent an entire day on Alcatraz..I walked every corner of the former prison. Remember as Canadians we have a great fascination about Hollywood and California. We cycled over to Sausalito and spent a day in Napa Valley visiting wineries and going for a hot air balloon ride. We also drove down the Coastal Highway #1 to Carmel ... our objective to meet up with Clint Eastwood...again another fascination especially for my Father he loved all the Spaghetti Westerns Eastwood made. We have a friend who is retired and living in San Mateo CA he belongs to a few clubs in the area and he tells me there is a huge Sicilian population in Northern California. This is good because no matter what part of Italy and no matter where they immigrated they always left a positive mark. Also you mention Aldo DeRose.. interesting since I know an Albert Della Rosa might be a close relative. Many Italians when they immigrated to USA and Canada changed their last names so they would blend in. Incidentally, I am the secretary of the Fogolar Furlan Club in Niagara a Friulano Club. The main reason I became involved was to further my research of my heritage. And at the same time I met some real nice people...Like Ivano!!!

Ciao e Mandi

Anonymous said...

To the Canadian Furlan:
and Ivano:
I toyed with the idea of going to the wine festival but the weather report reported a massive storm coming so that killed any idea of me going.
In 1997 I took a trip to San Francisco to see The Phantom of the Opera and I was going to visit Alcatraz but the boat was full.
This last summer I met the nephew of Al Capone. He does not look like Al Capone at all. He works as a technician. I met him at a friend's house only because her television went out and he came to fix it. When he left she said: "Did you know that was Al Capone's nephew?" I said, "No."
The nephew is the son of Rose, Capone's sister and her husband Frank Maritote alias(Frank Diamond). Frank is still alive but Rose died. Frank was part of the Capone crime machine in Chicago.I said, "He should write a book."
Clint Eastwood will say Hello to me if I see him in a store. I have always respected the privacy of famous people because I, on a small scale have been the victim of all sorts of twisted meanings, innuendo, double speak etc. As a result, I will never say anything to harm anyone's reputation.
I will say that Clint Eastwood is a frugal man because he had to start out doing all sorts of odd jobs before he became famous. On some occasions he likes to drive incognito and dress casually. Clint is married to Dina Ruiz and they have a little girl together. His first wife Maggie is really a nice person and they had two children together. He also has a child by Francis Fisher. He has other children, I think two with the last name of Reeves. Scott Reeves and possibly a sister. Beyond that I do not know much more, except, that to me he has always been friendly and appears to be a nice person.
Would someone call Aldo De Rose. He is listed in the Salinas, California phone directory. I want to know about the Italian Museum. I read in the paper this morning that they may put one on Cannery Row but they do not say whether it is Italian or not.
This will be a long blog comment but here goes.
After I read the Brovia article I thought this. The Brovia's suffering was a financial one. My suffering has been the Big C, cancer. It started in 1958, 59 somewhere in that time period. My father was diagnosed with colon cancer. He had a massive surgery. The whole household was in turmoil. If I had not been disciplined I would have been a school drop out. I sewed my own clothes, saved as much money as possible and continued on in school. Even in those days the surgery practically wiped out my parents savings so that my mother had to continue working in the canneries.
The next ordeal came in 1973 when my father died and then my other brother died in 1976, not of cancer but heart disease.
My mother made it to 1986 and was basically a healthy woman despite her being overweight. I have learned that being overweight is caused by stress as well as over-eating. She probably would have made it to 100 had she lived a different life because she was basically a healthy person but remember she was also a vegetarian and I do not know whether that had anything to do with her living longer or not.
1988 my husband was diagnosed with cancer. I had three nervous breakdowns. It was absolutely horrible. I think that the only way that I made it through was that in 1986 I had changed my diet to vegetarian and I felt better. I had had periodic headaches and the diet seemed to get rid of them. My husband died in 1991. The whole decade of the 1990's was the decade of the Big C.
The decade started with the death of my husband, then Diana's cancer came back and the following had cancer, Sharon, Eleanor Rogge, Retired Navy Commander Rene Gonzales, my brother, Giuliano, another friend and so it went! I don't think that I ever learned so much about any disease as I did about cancer. I took a college class on Wordperfect at MPC and met a retired oncologist who told me that there are 400 to 600 different cancers and some are viruses. We used to have lunch together and she told me some horror stories about cancer! I believe her wholeheartedly! It is truly a dread disease!
I helped Diana a lot. I did all of the anti cancer diets with her. I tried to help my brother as well. He saw things differently and I have to say displayed great courage under the circumstances. One of the times that I visited Sharon Purdue at the hospital she said, "I have to have a stand in for this." She really impressed me because of her sense of humor under those cancer circumstances.
I believe that garlic, green tea, olive oil and onions help a lot in preventing disease. A French Doctor cured himself of the Bubonic plague by eating certain foods one of which was onions. So, my mother may have been on to something with her diet.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Canadian Furlan said...

To Nancy... WOW you have certainly had your share. This has made you a strong person in more than one respect. Regarding Clint Eastwood I can appreciate his need for privacy and also his humble beginnings. As I mentioned in an earlier comment in Canada we have this great fascination with California and Hollywood. The actors that entertain us must realize that without the fans they would not be who they are. Some time ago I came across a professional athlete who was being unkind with fans that were seeking autographs. It just so happened that a sports writer was near by and took him aside and basically gave him a very eloquent ear full. I was two steps from them and I heard the entire conversation. I went up to the sports writer and shook his hand. He told me these guys (pro athletes)high up on their pedestals need a reality check from time to time, because they tend to forget who paid their way. I enjoyed all of Clint's movies and if I happen to see him on the street corner I would tell him as if he was a friend and maybe I would buy him a coffee. During my stay in San Francisco and area I felt this sense of mystique.. I can't really explain it. When in Alcatraz there it was even greater that's why I ended spending the entire day there. I know I will return for sure.
Your change in diet is good Nancy. I know many many individuals who have gone through what you have and changed their diets. My Mother and Father in law did the same and now are living a better quality of life. My parents both in their 80's have to some extent changed their diets mostly vegetables fruits and whole grains. My mother who is 81 has gone through hip surgery two weeks ago is now walking, slowly but she is mobile again.
We have taken on the same we do not have any junk foods in the house we have a lot of vegetables. The exercise is still the one thing we work on. I jog not as often as I used to but I try... unfortunately our winters are not kind so it makes it difficult. Today 13 degrees and COLD... snowing.... I can't wait for Spring.
Interesting info on the Capone family. Al Capone is another one that I have taken great interest in, I have a few books on Al. Al took advantage of a situation during his time "Prohibition" ... I am interested in knowing how prohibition ever became a national law. Certainly created a huge problem and also many many crimes.
As I mentioned I have a friend who lives in San Mateo CA a retired Lawyer.. who was born and raised in San Francisco. We try to meet once a year.


Take care I have to go now...

Ciao e Mandi

Keep the comments coming...

Anonymous said...

To the Canadian Furlan:
If you are interested in Al Capone you should talk to the nephew's father. The father Maritote (Diamond Jim or something like that)lives on the west side in Santa Cruz. Al Capone's sister was in love with someone else as was Maritote but Capone insisted that they marry. Anyway, I do not know anymore details except that the father Maritote and son live on the west side in Santa Cruz. And as I said the son is a technician.
I had another health problem, actually a nerve injury that happened May 2005. I was in excruciating pain. I have to say that someone else would have been in crutches, a walker and wheel chair. I fought the whole thing mostly with alternative vitamins, herbs etc. which for some strange reason do work with me and by October 2006 I did a five mile hike at Wilder ranch with friends Ted & Vickie.
I think it was at this time that I realized that perhaps I was stronger than I thought. It was also at this time that I saw a program that presented the idea that if you grew up on a ranch/farm you most likely would be tougher than most. You know I had never thought about this.
I always like the Eastwood huge family and Clint was more of an acquaintance than a friend. His wife Maggie was more of a friend but I have not seen her in a long time. The last ten years for me have been a whirlwind. I did the probate when my brother died, then I remodeled the house, then I bought the duplex, then I remodeled it. Then I did open houses to rent all these places when they came up for rent. The last thing that I would think about would be the people here in the Monterey area. And remember I was also dealing with a pretty nasty painful nerve injury but I was going to get it done no matter what!
I found out this morning that there is a group called the Italian History group in Monterey but I bet it is all Sicilian history. I already know that the original Sicilians were Greeks. They had a colony in Sicily. There are still Greek temples and Naples used to be called Neopolis, Siracuse had another Greek name and so on.
But I do not know much about Friuli. I think that the city of Venice is located there. Also, it was part of another country before it became Italian. Am I right??????
I always love learning anything about history.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

To Canadian Furlan:
I think that I may have made a mistake about the Al Capone relative.
Al Capone had two sisters.
I think that Frank Maritote was married to the older sister and was killed way back. The younger sister married Frank Maritote's brother, John Maritote. The younger sister's name was Mafalda. They were not in love. Each one loved someone else. John loved another girl and Mafalda loved a young man that she had met in Miami. Neither the bride nor groom could summon up much enthusiasm for the marriage. The internal politics of the Capone organization demanded the union. Frank the brother of John was ambitious and Capone to keep the lid on any takeover atrempt dictated that his sister marry Frank's brother John Maritote. For their sacrifice Capone gave the bride and groom $50,000 and a house as wedding presents. The reception was held at the Cotton Club. The wedding cake was shaped like an ocean liner and was huge. They honeymooned in Hawaii.
There is irony in all this too because with Capone's ruthless killing of his competitors, the tide began to turn against him and the city of Chicago had to choose between the rule of law or the rule of the gangster.
The irony is that years later his son became very close to becoming a police officer and many of his friends were police officers. Sonny Capone was a marksman of tournament quality who joined the Miami Police Dept. pistol team, became a member of the National Pistol Association of America and the Florida Police Officers' Association. The Police Officers thought highly of him.
The only son of Alphonse Capone, Albert Francis (Sonny) Capone changed his name.
The younger sister of Al Capone who was trapped along with her husband in the loveless marriage may very well be the one whose son lives in Santa Cruz with his father.
Frank Maritote is dead and that leaves John Maritote as the lone survivor as I have been told that Mafalda is also dead. The son looks Sicilian/Greek and does not resmble Al Capone at all, if indeed, he is the nephew of Al Capone.
Here, again, those people might want to have their privacy.
Question for the Canadian Furlan:
Do you think that the two men who escaped from Alcatraz survived? The essence of Alcatraz must be captivating.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Canadian Furlan said...

Nancy... Now you are going to really get me going.... Al Capone and Alcatraz...
The three Alcatraz inmates that escaped Frank Morris, John and Clarence Anglin. The fourth accomplice Allen West didn't make it, if you recall from Eastwood's film "Escape from Alcatraz" Allen West did not make the hole large enough to make his escape through. There are many urban legends that circulated for decades on the escape. Some people on the main land reported seeing men with prison clothing walking around the shore line ... I have a feeling they did make it. When I visited Alcatraz I attempted to replicate the prisoners moves throughout that evening of their escape. I had a problem trying to fit through the hole they made... they must have been very thin and a lot smaller back then. Prior to boarding the ferry across to Alcatraz a gentleman Darwin Coon was at the peer selling his book about Alcatraz he was one of the last 30 prisoners to leave Alcatraz prior to the official closing in 1963. I spoke with him and he said the food in Alcatraz was the best. So I would imagine the inmates did not really have too much to complain other than the solitary nature of being locked up. Incidentally, Darwin Coon ended up in Alcatraz after he robbed a bank which was a federal offense. As far as Al Capone and his family... his son they called him Sonny during his wedding day they have a photo of Al being there. Al must have been just recently released from prison. Going through all the documents about Al and his behavior in Alcatraz I believe Big Al was smart enough to fake his mental illness so he would gain an early release. I truly believe it was his last ditch hope after all other bribes failed. Where did all his money end up??? Oh that will be a good one Nancy.....
Take care Keep them coming...

We just received another 10" of snow last night.. I hope spring is coming I am getting tired of this weather..one weekend it melts and the next it all comes back....

Ciao e Mandi

Anonymous said...

To the Canadian Furlan:
I have a spring cold but I will still leave some information.
I am of the opinion that Al Capone's money went to the others in the crime organization. I suspect that Sam Giancana inherited the crime organization and the money involved with it. Also, Al had a brother who also went into the crime business, he sometimes went by the name Kovak.
In regards to the men who escaped from Alcatrez, I agree that they may have made it to shore. I guess no one knows for sure. Some say that there is a strong tide action that goes out to sea. I guess it would depend on the exact time of escape. I knew that there were only two who finally made the escape. I also liked the movie, The Birdman of Alcatrez.
My tenants in Santa Cruz are from Canada. They love the weather here and do not want to move back. Are you in the French speaking province of Quebec?
Somehow I think that Mafalda's husband would be too old to still be alive. I think that I will ask, next time that I am in Santa Cruz, although, they made it quite clear that it was Capone's sister who lived in the house behind their house. It is quite a mystery because some people say that Mafalda and her husband moved to Chicago on a permanent basis and that their son was studying to become a lawyer! What to believe???
Are there a lot of Italians in Canada?
I hate to even bring this subject up but I was stuck here on Sunday because I did not feel well and the whole day on the History channel had hour after hour on the Germans during WW11. What they had to say was stronger than anything the Russian university tapes showed. The SS. Nazi's etc. were called murderers and killers etc. and in some cases by other Germans. Some of the German soldiers who had no recourse because of the fear of being killed resorted to taking photographs with their cameras of the atrocities and after the war turned them over to the allies. I have to say that it was grim. If we have complaints about our situation all we have to do is think about those who had to live through that. Hitler had to be deranged. He had an assortment of criminal minds around him.
In the program on the history channel they also talked about de nazification or deprogramming the people. It is possible that the woman in Pebble Beach missed being de nazified. Who knows.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Anonymous said...

The fall of the Western half of the Roman Empire was brought about by really bad Emperors toward the end of its existance and also an arrogant attitude.
What had happened was that barbarian tribes from the FAR east had been forced to travel west because of the climate change. These tribes were from the borders of China and travelled many miles and finally arrived at the outer reaches of the Roman Empire's borders.
Some of the tribes were the Huns, Visigoths, Ostragoths etc. Some of these tribes were peaceful and only wanted to be part of the Roman Empire but the Romans would not allow this to happen and it brought about their own downfall. At first, they kept these tribes out but as time passed the tribes became more desperate for some relief from taxation and other injustices that they suffered at the hands of the Romans. They were treated badly by the Romans. At a future date Alaric who was not the uneducated barbarian that the Romans thought him to be but was educated and accomplished took his men to the gates of the Roman Empire all the way to Rome itself. And even there he told the Romans they could keep everything if only they would accept his people as part of the Empire, the Romans declined and so Rome was sacked. It was this continual arrogance that caused the fall of the Empire. Think about it, if the Romans had accepted those barbarians as part of their Empire they would have continued on because these people would have strengthened the Empire. In its last days Rome had really really BAD Emperors.
Even after Rome fell the barbarians offered to pay for land within the borders of the Empire. This astounded the Roman landowners.
The Huns eventually settled Hungary. The Ostragoths settled Italy and the Gauls settled France.
The Romans throughout their history were tolerant of other cultures and peoples. The only discrimination occurred when they conquered a country. At that point they collected slaves from the conquered people and the slaves were brought back to Rome to serve the Romans as slaves but even the slaves had hopes of being set free or being able to buy their own freedom. Had the Romans kept their original intent and way of doing things they would not have collapsed as an Empire. The other tribes that also wanted to be part of the Empire were the Germanic tribes and the Slavic tribes. The Slavic tribes were from the Russian steppes.
So one can say, that climate change which forced the barbaric tribes west, the arrogant incompetent attitude of the later Romans, and the failure to accept the barbarians who would have been accepted by earlier Emperors are all contributing factors to the fall of Empire. Add to that a touch of laziness and you have a disaster which did indeed happen when the Emperor Valerian decided to invade Persia and was defeated. Not only was he defeated but Valerian was captured and was stepped on by the Persians and later skinned with his skin put up on a pole for all to see. This had to have a demoralizing effect on the Romans and it was brought about by their own mistakes.
All that I can say is that Bush better know history or it will repeat itself!
Much later the Persians suffered severely at the hands of the Mongols. the Mongols would cut off the heads of their enemies and stack them up so that they looked like haystacks and placed the haystacks around various towns. It took the Persians a long time to get rid of the Mongols. Again, the Mongols came from the East.
There were a few spots on the west coast of Italy that remained intact. The town of Chiusi was a celtic town to begin with and the Celts could never fully conquer the area around it because the various towns had a slippery political system that kept them at bay. I imagine the same thing may have happened when the barbarian tribes moved into Italy. The Etruscan area has a mind of its own.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

kenneth said...

I seek information of the Quilici from Lammari Lucca Italy.

1) Luigi Quilici born 1852 immigrated to Nevada 1881 settled in Dayton Nevada married ? Selmi children Victorio, Duilio, Salvadore, Smeraldo, Luggero

2) Dominico Quilici born March 18 1854 Married Assunta Fontana born Oct 25 1854 of Lunata Sept 12 1879Settled in Elko and ran the Casino and San Martin Hotel was known as Duke. Latter settled into San Francisco and helped manage the Palace Hotel. children Luigi born Nov. 27 1884 Died April 19 1944 San Francisco CAL. Amerigo born 1885 Angelo born January 20 1886 died May 1 1974 San Mateo Cal. married Aquilina ? from San Pico a Vico. Giovanni Alberto born June 7 1891 died Feb. 22 1957 San Francisco. Amibilio born October 22 1893 died Dec. 7 1963 Alameda Cal.

3) Eugino born 1856

all three boys were born to Lorenzo Quilici and Maddalina Ballantini of Lammari Lucca Italy. they had a sister Annunizata born about 1850 she married in 1880 to Alessio Galli of Saltocchio Lucca Italy. She is whom I do the research for. Lorenzo Quilici Died April 12 1892 at the age of 80

if any one is related please contact me.

Anonymous said...

Luigi was my great great grandfather.
There are still Quilici's in Dayton.
There were four brothers, Pete, Joe, Alex and I forgot the fourth brother's name.
My father first arrived at Ft. Churchill. He worked in Nevada and then came to California. I think that Louie Poletti recruited him to run the Foothill Ranch in Davenport.
Pete stayed in Nevada and the Quilici's who remain in Nevada are his descendants.
Joe moved to San Jose. His first wife had died and he then married a second wife and had two children. One of his children became an engineer and was instrumental in the development of tanks for the Army. He was Vice President of FMC until he retired.
His sister Ada has done quite a bit of research into the family history and I am almost positive that the name of the Duke came up. The Duke had two well educated and successful daughters. I also met a Quilici who has four or five restaurants and lives part of the time in Italy. He is the one from Lammari and he is the one who gave us a copy of the Quilici Coat of Arms.
May mother still has relatives in Lucca. Her sister had a daughter who had two sons and they still live in the original family home of my mother's family.
I gave Ivano my email address and also that of Ada so if you want to email us you can. where do you live? Italy or America?
Nancy

Anonymous said...

Kenneth:
Luigi was my great great, posibbly, add another great grandfather. I was born when my mother was in her late forties early fifties and my father was in his fifties.
Pete's son Clifford, became a full Colonel in the Army. He is now deceased. They were the ones who remained in Dayton, Nevada. Jenny, the sister is still alive. I think that Ada has all the information on her. If you would like information on the Dayton Quilici's email me.
the names that you mentioned were EARLIER than the one's that I know but I am sure that we are related because the first Quilici to emigrate emigrated in the 1880's which would almost make them pioneers. I only have the names of the sons of those first people to emigrate and not their names so your name such as Sal etc. are unknown to me but their sons names are known to me as I have described.
I do remember the Duke. He had two daughters who were quite successful. I remember talk of them. I never met them, however. They may have had sons because I remember that there were two brothers who were Doctors in California.
If you want to contact me, contact Ivano and he will release my email address to you.
The name Galli is interesting. I think that it may be of French origin from the Gauls.
NQJ

Anonymous said...

Michelle Quilici is from Lammari but of recent emigration. He lives in San Rafael and is the one with all the restaurants. I did talk to him and he said that he no longer travels to Italy because he is quite old now. He does have the Quilici Coat of Arms. If you would like to talk to him please let me know.
NQJ

Anonymous said...

The Italian translation of Nancy is Annunziata. I know that I was named after a grandmother or great grandmother and now I will be wondering whether the relative mentioned was the relative that I was named after.
NQJ

Anonymous said...

Kenneth:
In your search know also that the ancestors went back and forth to Italy several times before deciding to stay in America. Some decided to stay in Italy. All of them travelled back and forth. Also, the reason that I could not remember the fourth brother's name is because he died young.
They also travelled to Italy to find a wife and life was not always easy here in America.
Going back to 1850 leaves me out because I only have information from 1880 forward. However, I do know that the Quilici's who settled in Nevada did go back and forth from early on. I do not have any first names before the 1900's except Luigi.
My cousin Ada wrote a book. It is called Our Days on the Desert by Ada Quilici Bommarito. In the introduction she states "My father was born Giuseppe Vincenzo Quilici on July 19, 1885 in San Pietro a Vico, Italy. He and his younger brother Pietro, born May 7, 1887 came to America in the early 1900's and were soon known as Joe and Pete. In 1917 the two brothers became partners of the Quilici Brothers Ranch in Nevada near Fort Churchill. In 1915, the youngest Quilici brother, Alessandro boarded a ship bound for America. He settled near Fort Churchill with his brother Pete. It was not until 1920 that he returned to Italy to marry Pia Dianda." Ada.
They had three children and he returned to United States and settled in Davenport, California. He sent for his wife and kids in 1935. They boarded the ship Rex and arrived in New York. Pia's brother drove them across country in a Hupmobile to Davenport, California. In 1955 they left the Foothill ranch and moved to Santa Cruz, California. I, (Nancy, Annunziata) was born to Alessandro and Pia in the late 1940's.
NQJ

Anonymous said...

Kenneth
I just learned that there was a Mayor of Carson City by the name of Don Quilici. Nevada might be chock full of leads in tracing the ancestors.
NQJ

Anonymous said...

Hi I am wondering if there is a possible relationship between my family and yours. Our first immigrant was Stefano Quilici. He was also from Lucca. If I recall correctly (?) one brother (Stefano) went to America and one went to South America

AIB said...

Regarding Stefano Q. Our group came from San Pietro A Vico, Lucca Italy. Eight brothers imagrated to Nevada during the post Gold rush era. Mansueto, Giuseppe,Natale and Pio settled in the Carson City area for some years doing farming, then returned to Italy to marry and raise families.Cherubino, Anibile and Sebastiano settled in Wells, Nevada. They went into business as saloon keepers and Merchantile store. Michele settled in Virgina City, staked out a mine and struck some gold. He settled in Dayton NV.
Our great grandfather, Domenico arrived during the gold rush in the late 1840s.This we know very little about. He returned to Italy, married Carola D'Achile and the couple had ten children.
Our dads Joe. Pete and Alexander arrived in the Carson City area between l900 and 1920.
Stefano could certainly be in the flock, but I have never heard of him. Good Luck...AIB

IVANO said...

Dear Anonymous Quilice Inq: I contacted Nancy Jacobs re: your inquiry. She is in the process of seeking more info for you. Sempre Avanti. ivn0

AIB said...

Multe grazie Ivano. O letto il tu libro. Ci ai scritto un mondo di historia per l'Italiani di SAnta Crosse. Back to English...I loved it! Continue the good work...AIB

ivano said...

Dear AIB: Thanks for your kind comments on my book 'La Nostra Costa'. And thank you for the updated info on the Quilici Family.
Perhaps we will meet someday. I have plans to attend (if every thing goes well) to attend the Davenport-Coast Road ReUnion in August in Santa Cruz. Perhaps we could meet then. Sempre Avanti e Buona Fortuna. ivno

AIB said...

Ivano and Nancy;
Sent e-mail, but it returned. It's confusing working on a new computer. Anyway,Thank you for your nice note Ivano and Nancy I hope you are doing well. Thank you for keeping me updated.
Regarding the Davenport doings in August: I am not sure I can make it. Having some medical problems. Hopefully the new medication will clear it up.
Ivano, I enjoy your blog very much...just learned how to access a blog these last few month. They are fun and interesting.
Keep up the good work...
Ivano,By now you've probably guessed that I am Ada Bommarito, Nancy's cousin. Keep me posted on the date and time of the August gala. (adaiq@sbcglobal.net)
Saluti e buon auguri da San Jose. AIB

ivano said...

Thanks Ada. Welcome to the 'LaNostra Costa" Blagga. ivno

kenneth said...

I seek information on Dominico Quilici born 1852< Lammari Capannori Lucca. Married Assunta Fontana in Lunata Capannori 1879. their children died in or around San Francisco.
Dominico is the brother to my wifes grandfather's mother, Annunizata Quilici Galli. Annunizata Died in 1920 Saltocchio, Lucca IT.
Their Father was Lorenzo Quilici born cira 1814 in Lammari,
Lorenzo father was Francesco Quilici.

I retain records for many of the Quilici from Lammari. I am also attempting to locate other family (Galli) that originated from Saltocchio LU IT. Daniele, Carlo Isola. I have located Umberto, Pietro and Adelle Galli Lucchesi

please contact me if you have access to contacts in Lucca Area

Ken (rumbleseat32@yahoo.com)