Sunday, February 17, 2008

FIGLIO DELLA COSTA - WILLIAM CAIOCCA REMEMBERED

Photo: Davenport c. 1930, where Bill and Leo Caiocca grew up and their parents Gilbert and Maria Caiocca, had their Davenport Bakery. (Photo: Courtesy of Len Klempneur).
THIS REMEMBRANCE OF WILLIAM "BILL" CAIOCCA WAS PUBLISHED IN THE SANTA CRUZ SENTINEL. BILL, HIS BROTHER LEO, AND THEIR PARENTS GILBERT AND MARIA CAIOCCA, WERE A BIG PART OF THE 'LA NOSTRA COSTA' STORY.


William "Bill" Caiocca
"Life's been good to me. I've done everything I've wanted to do, within reason. I have no regrets." -William B. Caiocca 12/23/2007
William "Bill" Caiocca passed away 2/06/2008 in Roseville, CA at the age of 92, following complicates of a recent stroke. William was born in Davenport, CA on July 10, 1915 to Gilbert and Maria Caiocca, who had immigrated from Switzerland and Italy. He attended the Pacific School in Davenport and graduated from Santa Cruz High School in 1934. William and his younger brother Leo helped their dad run the Caiocca & Sons Davenport Bakery as well as a grocery store in Santa Cruz. William served in the Army during World War II rising to the rank of Second Lieutenant, and served in the Army Reserves until 1953. During the war he served in military transportation and supervision of prisoners of war.
After the war William returned to Santa Cruz. With his long time business partner Joe Costella, they owned several businesses which included: The Bubble Bakery, Costella and Caiocca Hardware, Costella and Caiocca Appliances, and the Palomar Hotel with five other partners. William was also sales manager with Starr Oldsmobile until his retirement in 1976. He was a life time member of the Santa Cruz Elk's Club and held membership in the Rotary Club, the Marconi Club and the Santa Cruz County Swiss Club.
William's hobbies included duck hunting, shooting pool and making many trips with his wife to the casinos in Lake Tahoe where he enjoyed playing black jack.
William was preceded in death by his wife of 48 years Elaine in 2005 and his younger brother Leo, two months ago. He is survived by his son David & wife Lucy of Roseville, CA and three grandchildren Kelly, Tara and Patrick; sister-in-law Nara, nephews Fred and Gilbert, their families and cousin Louise Presepi. We will all miss his warm smile and sense of humor.
On Saturday March 1, 2008, 12 noon to 3:00 p.m. a memorial and celebration of life reception will be held for William at DeLaveaga Lodge Branciforte to Upper Park Rd., Santa Cruz. To be preceded by a private family grave site service at Holy Cross Cemetery, Santa Cruz. In lieu of flowers please make a memorial donation to the Alzheimer's Association of Santa Cruz, 1777 Capitola Rd. #A, Santa Cruz, CA 95062.Published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel from 2/13/2008 - 2/17/2008.


ADDIO, BILL CAIOCCA. UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN....ACROSS IL ULTIMO PONTE

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

I remember William Caiocca. He had a wonderful bakery that I loved to go to as a child.
It is sad that another little bit of Davenport is now only a memory!
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

dave scott said...

Thank you for your kind words.
Bill read your book "La
Nostra Costa" last year and
really enjoyed it; "I know
every person in it!" were his
comments. He'll truly be
missed. -his son, Dave Scott.

ivano said...

THANKS DAVE: IN THE OLD DAYS. "SU PER LA COSTA" MY FAMILY KNEW THE CAIOCCA FAMILY EXTREMELY WELL (ALTHOUGH YOUR GRANDFATHER DIED IN 1947.). I STILL HAVE A MENTAL PICTURE OF YOUR GRANDMOTHER MARIA STANDING AT THE FRONT COUNTER AT MIRAMAR IN DAVENPORT . After your Grandfather died, I REMEMBER THAT YOUR FATHER BECAME THE BUSINESS MAN OF THE FAMILY. YOUR GRANDMOTHER WAS EXTREMELY PROUD OF HIM. IVNO

Anonymous said...

If I am not mistaken, the Caiocca Bakery was on the corner of Cedar and Maple in Santa Cruz. I loved going there. You could smell the bread baking a block away! I hope that I have the right bakery. That corner bakery is clear as a bell in my mind. The building was painted white with blue trim, if I am not mistaken.
After we bought the bread we then travelled not far to the butcher shop on Pacific Street. My father liked to order and eat fried fat strips. I did not like them and neither did my mother so we got our own things.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

I attended Bill Caiocca's Memorial Luncheon at the DeLaveaga Lodge last Saturday. There I met Bill and Leo's families along with many 'amici della costa'. One in particular deserves special mention. Louisa Presepi. Louisa is 100 years old and her mind is still sharp. She still remembers the time when she and her husband, Amerigo "Piccino" Presepi lived on the Gulch Ranch (c.1940-42). I write about the Presepi's in 'La Nostra Costa', P.38, when under 'Piccino's' leadership the Gulch Ranch became known as "Il Rancio di Pompieri" (The Ranch of the Firemen). It was really great having Louisa with us on Saturday. And a special thank you to the Caiocca family for having us and for sharing some very special memories. ivno

Ivano said...

One more thing about the luncheon. The Caiocca Family had several old photos on display. One was of the Miramar Cafe Building (c.1946) which was (is) located on the south-east cornor of the Coast Road and Ocean Ave. The name on the Building was not the Miramar as I have stated in the book. It was Caiocca and Sons Davenport Bakery.
Thelma (Micossi) Gill who attended the Luncheon, informed me that the name Miramar did not come into existence until some years later (c.1949) when Evelyn and Mac Morelli bought the business.

Just another reason to publish a 2nd edition of "La Nostra Costa" where I can correct all those mistakes I made in the 1st edition.

ivn0

Anonymous said...

I remember two bakeries. Which one belonged to the Caioccas's? It is so strange I remember them both so clearly. I also remember a Novelli delivering the bread but cannot remember from which bakery. In fact, the box for the bread delivery still exists in the garage at 503. When we first moved there I would go out and pick up the bread and take it into the kitchen from the garage.
One of the bakeries was in Davenport and the other in Santa Cruz. Which one belonged to the Caiocca family?
I am now very curious!
Nancy Quilici Jacobs

Ivano Franco Comelli said...

Right Nancy. The driver of the bread truck was Abbie Novelli. In 'La Nostra Costa' I write regarding the DeLucca Accident on the Coast Road (1947): ".....there were so many people injured, that Abbie Novelli's bread truck was commandeered to help transport the victims. (During this period of time Abbie Novelli was a famiiiar sight up and down the Coast Road, making daily deliveries in his paneled truck for the Davenport Bakery.)" [P.293]

Abbie hss since crossed "Il Ultimo Ponte". Like some many other 'Amici della Costa' his body is entombed at the Holy Cross Cemetary in Santa Cruz. ivn0

dave scott said...

Hello Ivano,
Bill Caiocca closed the Davenport Bakery in late 1942 to go to war. Bill C. and Joe Costella openned the Bubble Bakery in 1947 in Santa Cruz. Not sure if Davenport Bakery reopened. Bill never mentioned operating Davenport Bakery post WWII (I could be wrong.)
dave

Ivano said...

Dave: I don't know about the bakery in Santa Cruz,however, the Davenport Bakery in Davenport certainly was open after the war. I remember visiting my God-Mother, Pina Micossi, there after she formed a partnership with the Caiocca Family, and I can remember Maria serving at the counter. According to Thelma (Micossi)Gill, Gilbert (your grand-father)died in 1947. It was at about this time that Bill sold the family interest to Dominico Della Santina (Lambari) and started up the "Bubble Bakery" with Joe Costella in Santa Cruz. (La Nostra Costa;p. 111) Ivano

Anonymous said...

I believe that Abbie Novelli was Angelina's son. Angelina was a good friend of my parents and lived on the ranch right after Davenport on the way to Santa Cruz going south.
Since you mentioned the DeLucca accident I sent you wikepedia information on the sinking of the Andria Doria. What the article does not say is that Italians were thought to be gulity even if they were not at that time because of WW11. The American military later did reenactments of the accident and the liner most likely responsible for the accident was the Stockholm, although, both liners took the wrong evasive actions to avoid the collision. I believe that wholesale discrimination starts at the very top of government policy making in this country. Probably not anymore but certainly very much so during the 20th century. And the Italians were not alone. Worse than the Italians were the American Indians who/rarely/never received credit/medals for their valor during time of war and the Blacks had it just as hard if not harder than anyone else.
Nancy Quilici Jacobs