Thursday, March 22, 2007

GINO'S OFFICIAL ITANGLISH DICTIONARY


IN LA NOSTRA COSTA, I MADE AN ATTEMPT TO DESCRIBE TO THE READER
HOW THE ITALIANI DELLA COSTA PRONOUNCED CERTAIN 'ITALIANIZED ' WORDS (LNC: P. 65). I DIDN'T KNOW AT THE TIME THAT AN ITANGLISH DICTIONARY ACTUALLY EXISTED. GINO "D'BAFFI" HAS GIVEN ME HIS GRACIOUS PERMISSION TO PUBLISH IT HERE. SO FROM 'GILLAROY' TO 'HAFFA MOOM BAY', HERE IS GINO'S OFFICAL ITANGLISH DICTIONARY.
The Itanglish Dictionary GINO

A brief course in deciphering the pronunciation of English words by Italian immigrants.
The fist column contains the Italian pronunciation with Italian spelling. The second indicates the American pronunciation. The third column gives the English meaning. The last column gives the actual Italian word. Syllables listed in all capitals are the stressed syllables.

A. AisCRIme Ice-CREE-meh Ice Cream Gelato
AisCULle Ice-COOL-leh High School Scuola Media
AIsse-BOcchise EYE-seh-BO-key-seh Ice Box
AitTON Eye-TONE High Tone (firsta classe)
AlluINi All-oo-EE-nee Halloween
arCHEche Are-KEH-keh Hot Cakes
ArMONica Ar-MON-ee-ka Accordion ( Squizabocchise)
AUsse OW-seh House Casa
B. BaiSIcolo By-SEE-colo Bicycle Bicicletta
BAraTENda BAH-rah-TEN-dah Bartender Barista
BECcheRIa BECK-eh-REE-ah Bakery Panetteria
BIcci BEE-chee Beach Spiaggia
BILlo BEEL-low Bill Conto
BITte BEET-teh Beets Barbabietola
BLEcchi BEri BLEK-ee-BEH-ree Blackberries More
BOCchise BAW-kee-seh Box Cassa
BOIla BOY-la Boiler (water heater)
BOTti BOH-tee Boots Stivali
BOTto BOH-toe Boat Barca
BRIcchi BREE-key Bricks Mattoni
BROscia BRAW-sha Brush Pennello,
Spazzola
BROscia BRAW-sha Underbrush Sottobosco
BULdoghe BOOL-dog-ghe Bulldog Molosso
C. CaraPIla Cara-PEE-la Caterpillar Trattore
CaoBOi Cow-BO-ee Cowboy Bovaro
CARro CAR-row Automobile Automobile
CECco CHECK-oh Check Assegno
CESteFIo CHESS-teh-FEE-oh Chesterfield SofĂ 
CESteNOzze CHESS-teh-NOH-tzeh Chestnuts Castagne
CHEcca KEH-cah Cake Dolce
CHENdo KEN-doe Garbage Can
CIMINEa CHEE-ME-NAY-ah Chimney Camino
CiRIFfo Chee-REEF-foh Sheriff
Ciu MEca Chew-MEH-ca Shoe Maker Calzolaio
CiUN GOmma CHEWN-GO-ma Chewing Gum
CREPolo CREPE-olo Cripple Storpio
CRICche CREE-keh Creek Fiumicino
CRIsimas CREE-zee-moss Christmas Natale
CucCAUsse Coo-COW-seh Cookhouse Cucina
D. DAno DOcchise DON-oh-DAW-key-seh Donald Duck Paperino
DevenPORto Deven-POUR-toe Davenport
DIccio DEE-cho Ditch Sorco
Donazzi DOH-not-see Doughnuts Frittelle
DRAIa DRY-ah Drier Asciugatrice
DRAiVAre Dry-VAR-eh To Drive Guidare
DRAIvuE DRY-voo-WEH Driveway Vialetto
Dreppi DRAY-pee Drapes Drappeggi
DROghiSTOro DRAW-ghee-STORE-ro Drug Store Farmacia
E. eLETtrico eh-LET-tricko Electricity ElettricitĂ 
EpiBORdei eh-pee-BORE-day Happy Birthday Felice
Compleanno
F. FAIacrecche FI-ah-creck-keh Firecrackers
FAiamenne FI-ya-men-neh Firemen Pompieri
FAItte FIGHT-teh Fight Lotta
FarMOLe far-Maw-leh Farmall
FIUsa FEW-za Fuse Fusibile
FonoGRAFo Phone-oh-GRAF-oh Phonograph Giradischi
FORte GiuLAI FOR-teh Jew-LIE Fourth of July 4 Luglio
FRENci BREDde FREN-chee-BRED-deh French Bread Pane Francese
FREscioLAI FRESH-oh-LYE Flashlight Lampadina
FrigiDEa Free-gee-DAY-ah Frigidaire Frigorifero
FRIsa FREE-zah Freezer Congelatore
FUTteBALlo FOO-teh-BOLL-o Football Calcio
G. GaRAge Ga-RAH-je Garage Autorimessa
GHEIme UAden Gay-meh-WA-den Game Warden
GASsoLIno GOS-so-LEE-no Gasoline Gasolio
GiNAtri Gee-NAH-tree Gene Autrie
GHIrol GHEE-role Girl Ragazza
GOLdiLOcchise GOAL-dee-LOCK-kee-se Goldilocks Biondina
GOmitri GO-me-tree Eucalyptus (gum tree)
GROSserIA GROSS-sir-REE-ya Grocery Mercato
GUAfo GWA-foe Wharf Molo
GurMOni Goor-MOW-knee Good Morning Buon Giorno
GunNAI Goon-NIGH Good Night Buona Notte
H. (there are no Itanglish words beginning in H)
I. ImPLOma Eem-PLO-ma Employment Office
InDIAni In-DYA-knee Indians
INge EEN-jeh Engine Motore
ISte EASE-teh Easter Pasqua
J. (the letter J is not included in the original Italian alphabet)
K. (neither is the letter K)
L. L’ARINga La-REEN-gah The Lone Ranger
LeborDeh Leh-Bore-Day Labor Day Festa di Lavoro
LiNOIo Lee-NOY-oh Linoleum
LONdri LONE-dree Laundry Lavanderia
M. MaCIna ma-CHEE-na Machine Macchina
MAPpo MA-poe Mop Strofinaccio
MEcci MEH-chee Matches Fiammiferi
MICchi MAUsse ME-key-MA-oo-seh Mickey Mouse
MErigoRAU MEH-ree-go-ROW Merry Go Round Giostra
miSTECca mi-STEAK-cah Mistake Sbaglio
MoroSAIco Moro-SIGH-co Motorcycle Motocicletta
MOSceRUMmi MOH-sheh-ROOM-me Mushrooms Funghi
MOSci Melo MO-she-MEL-oh Muskmelon Popone
MUM PIccia MOOM-PEE-cha Moving pictures Cinema
N. NUSepepa NEW-se-pepa Newspaper Giornale
NU IEze NOO YAY-zeh New Year’s Capo d’anno
O. otTELlo o-TELL-o Hotel Albergo
OmBRELlo ohm-BREL-low Umbrella Paracqua
P. PENsolo PEN-solo Pencil Matita
PIcce PEE-che Peaches Pesche
PICcoppe PEEK-op-peh Pickup Furgoncino
piNOzze Pee-NO-tzeh Peanuts Arachidi
PuLISSeMENne Poo-LEASE-eh-MEN-neh Policeman Polizziotto
PostOFFice Post-OFF-ee-che Post Office Ufficio Postale
Q. QUIcche QUEEK-keh Quick Svelto
R. RAdio RAH-dyo Radio
RanCEre Ron-CHAIR-eh Rancher Agricoltore
REDdeVUDde REH-deh-VOO-deh Redwood
RENcotto WREN-cut-toe Raincoat Impermiabile
RIve REE-veh River Fiume
RObenzo RO-ben-tso Robin Pettirosso
ROCchin Cea ROCK-in CHE-ah Rocking chair Sedia dondolo
RIfolo REEF-oh-low Rifle Fucile
S. Santa CROce Santa-CROW-che Santa Cruz
SAN GiuSE SAHN-jew-ZEH San Jose
SanGUIccio Song-WE-cho Sandwich Panino ripieno
SANiCLOSi SAHN-ee-CLAWS-ee Santa Claus Babbo Natale
SciaROPpe Shah-ROP-peh Shut Up! Sta Zitto!
SCIAvola SHAH-vole-ah Shovel Pala
SciO SHAW Show (movies) Cinema
SCHI-ni SKI-knee Skinny Magro
SCIUse SHOO-zeh Shoes Scarpe
SCIUsciaine SHOO-shine-eh Shoe Shine Lustrascarpe
SEveNOPpe SEH-veh-NOP-peh 7-Up
SIgoli SEE-goal-ee Sea Gulls Gabbiani
ScruDRAIva Screw-DRY-vah Screwdriver Cacciaviti
SLAIda SLY-dah Slide Frana

SPRAusi SPRAW-zi Sprouts Cavolini di
Bruscelle
STECco STECK-ko Stick Bastone
STEggio STAY-joe Stage Autobus
STIma STEE-ma Steam Vapore
STOMpo STOHM-poe Stump Ceppo
STOPpa Saine STUP-pa-SIGH-neh Stop Sign Fermata
STOro STOW-row Store Negozio
STRITteCARro STREET-teh-CARro Streetcar Tram
STROberi STRAW-beh-ree Strawberries Fragole
SUIccio SWEE-cho Switch Interuttore
SUpeMENne SOUP-eh-MEN-neh Superman
T. TEleVIgio TEle-VEE-joe Television Televisione
TENchisGHIVi TEN-keys-GHEE-vee Thanksgiving
TEneRIa TEN-err-REE-ah Tannery Conciatoio
ToMAte Toe-MA-teh Tomatos Pomodori
TraiSIcolo Try-SEEK-oh-low Tricycle Tricicletta
TRETte TRET-teh Tractor Trattore
TroBOlo Tro-BO- lo Trouble problemi, difficolta
TROCco TROCK-ko Truck Autocarro
TURco TOUR-co Turkey Tacchino
U. UarraMElo Wah-rah-MEL-oh Watermelon Anguria
UASci maCIna Washy ma-SHE-na Washing Machine Lavatrice
UIni da PU WEE-knee dah POO Winnie the Pooh
V. VISchi VEE-ski Whiskey Uischi
W, X, Y not in the Italian alphabet
Z. ZUppa MItte TSU-pa-MEET-teh Soup Meat Bollito

AVVISO

YOUA MAKA DA REPUBLICA WITTOUTA MYA OK, I BREAKA YOUA LEGGA.
IFA YOUA NO'NO WATCHA DOIN'A, "CLICCA" COMMENTI A BASSO ANDA I GIVA YOUA MOA 'COME SI DICE."

GINO "D'BAFFI" CAMPIONI LINGUINI'STA

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ivano,
Mamma mia, warra messe! Iu tinche u riderz uil stende for disse?

Rigardze, Luigi da Puglia

gino "d'baffi" campioni said...

Ciao Ivano,

Allora lo hai fatto e? I hope this doesn't degrade the high class reputation of your blagga site, but thanks for publishing my words of wisdom, no ..... confusione.

When I first entered school in 1940 along with your brother Gianni, I felt underprivileged that I could not get any help from my parents on learning English or other courses. Now it seems it may have been a blessing. Not hearing any English spoken at home, I did not pick up the grammatical errors which children from a long line of Americans did. I did have a disadvantage, however, with math. My mother only was permitted to attend 3 years of school. That was the extent to which she could help me. (Baffi had to go to work full time without ever seeing the inside of a school until he and Ada studied for naturalization. Baffi actually taught himself to read both Italian and English. He also learned some French while working in Marseilles) Thus, I was on my own as far as studies went. I never got very far, but did graduate high school. Four years of Latin at Holy Cross did help me with my English. I thought that knowing Italian somewhat would make Latin a snap. WRONGGGG!! It was the toughest course I ever took. Glad I did, though.

Continued success with your book. I hope to see it on the Italo Americano-beste sellere lista.

Saluti, Gino

kathy Kerrick said...

Ivano: This is quite funny. Some people had to spend some time composing this. Maybe D & I should stop studying I'Italiano and just memorize Baffi's dictionary.

Looking forward to seeing you.

kk

leroy pyle said...

Looks good here. Very clever!
Leroy (Pyle)

LNC: Thanks Leroy. Leroy Pyle is a Retired San Jose Police Officer and currently the webmaster for the San Jose Police Benevolent Association. The "Blagga" has powerful friends. ivn0

gloria gargiulo said...

Grazie ..... Ted would have loved this ....I can hear him laughing from heaven ...
gloria

LNC: Thanks Gloria. Perhaps when the time comes Ted can meet with Gino "D'Baffi" across "Il Ultimo Ponte" and together (Gino plays the "squizabocchise" )they can compose some beautiful music for his (Gino's) less than sacred words. ivn0

Ivano said...

Well, Gino isn't done yet. For your further instructions in eyetalian check his message below.
ivn0

Ciao Ivano,

Yesterday's fuss with Itanglish gave me quite a chuckle. Later in the day I saw a bit of a cooking program on TV with Nick Stellino. The cooking and his antics were nice, but when a lady announcer read his recipe, her pronunciation made my teeth ITCH! He was cooking "tortiglioni". A Sicilian dish. How did she pronounce it? "Tor-tiggle-leeO-nee"! Porca miseria!

Here are a few clues on Italian pronunciation:

First of all, the vowels in Italian always sound the same: A is always "ah". E is always "eh" (as in bet). I is always "ee" (as in beet). O always sounds like the o in "sought". U is always oo.

To an Italian, the English A sounds like "ei". The E sounds like "i", the O sounds like "ou", and the U sounds like "iu".
Learn these, and you will never say, "EYEtalian", "ROWma", "Milanou" or "Firenzee".

The most jarring noises from an English speaking person are those Italian words containing a G before an N or an L.
The GN before an O becomes a "NYO" as in bagno. (pronounced BANyo, not bag-no). Before an A, as in "bagnare" it is banYAReh, (not bag-nar-eeh) There used to be a famous baseball player by the name of "Conigliaro". (rabbit grower) His name was always pronounced "Coniggle-ee-arrow" by the sportscasters. It should have been, "Co-neel-YAR-oh".

Ogniuno dovrebbe sapere queste cose. Did you pronounce "ogniuno " correctly? If you said, "0h-NYOO-no" ten points for you!
By the way, you have probably heard a lot about the famous Tommy LaSorda, the baseball manager. Did you think LaSorda meant "the sword"? If so, give back 5 points. It means, "The Deaf Woman". Don't believe it? Look it up in your Mondadori Italian/English dictionary.

Any questions? Send them in.

Saluti da Gino (a friend of Uini da Pu)

Sally said...

oh so Italian

Ivano Cargnello said...

Several years ago Renzo Vidoni, who was a past President of the Fogolar Furlan of Ottawa had developed something similar . He called it, I believe, Italese ( Italian and Canadese)

As you probably know Canada is a bilingual country. Hence Italian mixed in two ways:

In the English speaking Provinces where the majority speaks English Italian mixed with English. However in the province of Quebec where the official language is French Italian tended to mix differently. The Italian spoken in of Quebec has considerable French in it.

LNC: Ivano (love that name)Cargnello is a Furlano living in Canada. He is President of one of the Foglars-Furlan in Canada. His family originally immigrated from Friuli to Argentina and then Canada. Unfortunately, I have learned that there are no Foglars-Furlan on the West Coast of the US. Only on the East Coast. Are you Furlanos out there listening. We need to organize one----don't you think. --"The Other Ivano"

Norma and Al said...

Ivan0

What a wonderful job Gino did in the translation!!! How did
He do it? He has tremendous knowledge of the Italian language. Yes – I think you should send a copy via e-mail
To Eraldo DiSimo (John Battistini’s nephew). That would be Really great and ask for his input. Also give him my regards.

I will e-mail him in the near future also. I have a foto of him

With Andrea Bocelli at Lago Puccini near Viareggio.

Norma and Al Wilson

Anonymous said...

Hi. This is Doreen a Radio `Ham` friend of Gino. I have been hearing about his "ITANGLISH DICTIONARY" for some time now.
I think Gino"d`baffi" has done a great job and happy he has finally sent to you. Thank you for sharing your interesting Blog Ivano.
Ciao from Doreen, `Down Under.`

Anonymous said...

Ei Ivano,

I looked via gooogle, and what did I see?

A lot of stuff that put some fear in me.

Now I ask myself how I got into this.

I used to be as tranquil as a fish.

Now to all the world you my tale have told.

I feel like a fish in a goldfish bowl.

Mamma Mia!

Gino

Anonymous said...

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Ivano Franco Comelli said...

11/25/09 Thanks Anonymous, above.
I really get a thrill when one comments on these 'older' articles.
'Gino's Dictionary' is one of my most favorite postings. Have a Happy Thanksgiving 2009. ivno